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Oklahoma Severe Storms, Straight-line Winds, Tornadoes, And Flooding (DR-4438)

Incident Period: May 07, 2019 - June 09, 2019
Major Disaster Declaration declared on June 01, 2019

Individual Assistance Applications
Approved: 2,194

Total Individual & Households Program
Dollars Approved: $15,182,955.51

Total Public Assistance Grants
Dollars Obligated: $511,077.19

Designated Counties (Individual Assistance):

Alfalfa, Canadian, Cherokee, Craig, Creek, Delaware, Garfield, Kay, Kingfisher, Le Flore, Logan, Mayes, Muskogee, Noble, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Payne, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah, Tulsa, Wagoner, Washington, Woods

Financial Assistance

Individual Assistance - Dollars Approved

$15,182,955.51

Total Individual & Households Program (IHP) - Dollars Approved*

$12,997,573.92

Total Housing Assistance (HA) - Dollars Approved*

$2,185,381.59

Total Other Needs Assistance (ONA) - Dollars Approved*

2,194

Total Individual Assistance (IA) - Applications Approved*

Public Assistance - Dollars Approved

$511,077.19

Total Public Assistance Grants (PA) - Dollars Obligated✝

$111,856.58

Emergency Work (Categories A-B) - Dollars Obligated✝

$5,328.75

Permanent Work (Categories C-G) - Dollars Obligated✝

* Dollars Approved: Assistance dollars approved but not necessarily disbursed.
✝ Dollars Obligated: Funds made available to the State via electronic transfer following FEMA's final review and approval of Public Assistance projects.

Learn more about FEMA Disaster definitions. Information is updated every 24 hours.

Registering for Disaster Assistance

Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated area can begin applying for assistance.The designated counties for eligible applicants are Alfalfa, Canadian, Cherokee, Craig, Creek, Delaware, Garfield, Kay, Kingfisher, Le Flore, Logan, Mayes, Muskogee, Noble, Nowata, Okmulgee, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Payne, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah, Tulsa, Wagoner, Washington and Woods

Registration is available in the following ways:

  • Online at DisasterAssistance.gov.
  • Phone (800) 621-3362 (voice, 711/VRS-Video Relay Service) (TTY: (800)462-7585). Multilingual operators are available (press 2 for Spanish).
  • Via the FEMA app, available for Apple and Android mobile devices. To download visit: fema.gov/mobile-app.

The following information is helpful when registering:

  • Address of the location where the damage occurred (pre-disaster address).
  • Current mailing address.
  • Current telephone number.
  • Insurance information.
  • Total household annual income.
  • Routing and account number for checking or savings account (this allows FEMA to directly transfer disaster assistance funds into a bank account).
  • A description of disaster-caused damage and losses.

Individual Assistance for homeowners and renters can include grants to help pay for temporary housing, home repairs and other serious disaster-related expenses not met by insurance or other assistance programs.

Low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration are available to businesses, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters to cover residential and business losses as a result of the disaster. Applicants can visit their nearest disaster recovery center for one-on-one assistance or apply online using SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

In addition, applicants can get more information on SBA disaster assistance by calling SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955, by visiting www.sba.gov/disaster, or by emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing may call (800) 877-8339.

Find out more at https://www.fema.gov/okmit and https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4438. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/femaregion6 and the FEMA Blog at http://blog.fema.gov.

 

News Releases

Updates and Articles, Blogs, and News Releases for Oklahoma 4438-DR

What to Expect After Registering for Disaster Assistance

Inspections occur once survivors register with FEMA. They are an essential part of the recovery process for survivors who need to make their homes livable again or have serious personal property loss. Homeowners and renters should make sure their contact information is up to date and have access to a telephone. They will need to have a photo ID and proof of ownership or a lease.

Disaster Survivor Assistance Teams go door to door in affected areas to answer questions about the types of help available, help survivors apply for state and federal assistance, update an applicant’s contact information and help with referrals to whole community partners. Team members wear blue FEMA shirts.

DSA Team members and housing inspectors have photo IDs. Survivors should ask to see them.

Those who had damage should contact their insurance agent before registering for FEMA assistance online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. Applicants may also call 800-621-3362 or (TTY) 800-462- 7585 from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

 What to expect after you apply for FEMA aid. You may receive an application to apply for a low-interest long-term SBA loan. Completing the SBA loan application is an important step in finding out what aid may be available to you. As a homeowner you may borrow up to $200,000 to repair/replace your primary residence, and up to $40,000 to repair/replace personal property. You are not required to accept the loan in order to receive FEMA assistance, but it may enable you to be considered for additional types of assistance. An inspector will contact you to schedule a visit. Be ready to keep your scheduled appointment. Appointments take 30-40 minutes and you must be present. Contact your insurance agent if you have insurance. Prove your identity. Show these documents:-Photo ID: driver’s license or passport.-Proof of occupancy: lease or utility bill.-Proof of ownership: deed, title, mortgage payment book, or tax receipts.(*This is not an exhaustive list.) During the Inspector’s VisitInspectors will…-wear official FEMA ID badges.-confirm your disaster registration number.-review structural and personal property damages.-ask you to sign official documentation.-verify ownership and occupancy. Inspectors won’t….-determine eligibility.-cost any money.-ask for credit card information.-take the place of an insurance inspection. After the Inspector’s visit….You will be sent a decision letter. If approved for aid:-You will receive a check or an electronic funds transfer.-A follow-up letter will explain how the money can be used. If you have questions regarding the letter, you can visit a Disaster Recovery Center in your area (fema.gov/drc) or call us at 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service). For TTY, call 800-462-7585.
<p>A graphic describing what happens after you register for disaster assistance with FEMA.</p> Download Original

Understanding Your Determination Letter

Q: My FEMA determination letter says my application for disaster assistance is “ineligible” or “incomplete.” What can I do?

A: All disaster assistance applicants have the right to appeal, and sometimes a quick fix is all that is needed to change a “no” to a “yes.” Read your letter all the way through to clarify why your application was labeled “ineligible” or “incomplete.” Always be sure to follow up—do not just give up—with the determination letter.

 

Q: I want to appeal my determination letter. How can I do that?

A: All appeals must be in writing. When writing your appeal, explain why you think the decision about the amount or type of assistance you received is not correct. You, or someone who represents you or your household, must sign the letter. If the person writing the letter is not a member of your household, there must be a signed statement from you explaining that the person may act on behalf of you and your household.

 

Q: What do I do with my written appeal and my other appeal documents?

A: Bring your determination letter, your written appeal and the supporting documents requested in your determination letter to any disaster recovery center. For locations visit  www.fema.gov/DRC or Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-FEMA (3362).

 

Q: I cannot make it to a disaster recovery center. Can I still appeal my determination letter?

A: Yes. You can mail your written appeal and all supporting documents to:

FEMA – Individuals and Households Program
National Processing Service Center
P.O. Box 10055
Hyattsville, MD 20782-7055

Fax your appeal packet to 800-827-8112, Attention: Individuals and Households Program. When mailing or faxing your appeal packet, be sure to include your personal FEMA registration number and the disaster number, DR-4413-AK, on all your documents. Your letter must be postmarked within 60 days of the date on your determination letter.
 

Q: Can I email my appeal packet to FEMA?

A: No. FEMA cannot process your appeal via email, but you can submit it on our website. You can open a disaster assistance center account at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. Once the account is created, you can update your current contact information, upload your appeal documents and review letters from FEMA. When you upload the required documents to your account, an appeal packet is automatically created which can then be submitted for review.

 

 

SBA Disaster Loan Outreach Centers

 

Applicants can apply for a low-interest disaster loan at their nearest disaster recovery center or online using SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Survivors can get more information on SBA disaster assistance by calling SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955, by visiting www.sba.gov/disaster, or emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.  Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing may call 800- 877-833.

American Sign Language Resources

Cleaning Up After a Disaster

Flood survivors do not need to wait for a visit from the Federal Emergency Management Agency or their insurance company to start cleaning up and make repairs. FEMA inspectors and insurance claims adjusters will be able to verify flood damage even after cleaning has begun.


Below are a few simple guidelines to follow that will make the clean-up and salvage process safer and easier:


Returning Home

  • Always wear protective clothing including long-sleeved shirts, long pants, rubber or plastic gloves and waterproof boots or shoes. 
  • Before entering your home, check for structural damage and look outside for damaged power lines, gas lines and other exterior damage.

  • Take photos of your damage before you begin clean up and save recovery-related and repair receipts.

  • Your home may be contaminated with mold, which raises the health risk for those with asthma, allergies and breathing conditions.

    • For more info on mold, refer to the Center for Disease Control

  • Open doors and windows so your house can air out before spending any length of time inside.

  • Turn off main electrical power and water systems and don’t use gas appliances until a professional can ensure they are safe.

  • Check all ceilings and floors for signs of sagging or other potentially dangerous structural damage.

  • Throw out all foods, beverages and medicines exposed to flood waters or mud including canned goods and containers with food or liquid.

  • Also, immediately throw away wet contents or any items that absorb water and cannot be cleaned or disinfected like (bedding, mattresses, carpeting, furniture, stuffed animals, etc.) because of health issues that may arise with mold.

  • Beware of snakes, insects, and other animals that may be on your property or in your home.

Emergency management officials encourage survivors to register for FEMA assistance as soon as they can. They only need to register once and only one registration is allowed per household. Once registered, keep in touch with FEMA and update contact information if it changes.

 

FEMA assistance may help eligible homeowners and renters pay for a temporary place to stay, make repairs or replace certain damaged contents.

 

Flood Insurance Requirements for Recipients of Federal Disaster Assistance

 

When property owners receive financial assistance from the Federal Government following a Presidentially declared disaster, they may be required to purchase flood insurance coverage. Here is information for flood insurance requirements for recipients of federal disaster assistance.

 

Building Back Stronger for Resiliency


What is Mitigation? Mitigation is the effort to reduce loss of life and property by lessening the impact of disasters. In order for mitigation to be effective we need to take action now—before the next disaster—to reduce human and financial consequences later (analyzing risk, reducing risk, and insuring against risk). It is important to know that disasters can happen at any time and any place and if we are not prepared, consequences can be fatal.

For repairing and rebuilding information for residents and communities in Oklahoma impacted by flooding and tornadoes, visit: Oklahoma Disaster Mitigation

Oklahoma Rumor Control 

  • Rumor: Renters can't apply for FEMA assistance
  • Rumor: Home inspectors ask applicants for their registration number or money
    • Fact: FEMA inspectors will never ask you for the unique nine digit registration number you were assigned when you applied; they will have it on file. Ask the inspector to confirm your registration number if you're suspicious of your home inspector. Also, FEMA inspectors will never ask you for money.
  • Rumor: Oklahoma residents can buy a flood insurance policy now, and it will cover the flood water damage caused by flooding from the severe weather in May/June
    • Fact: It typically takes 30 days from the date an NFIP policy is purchased for it to go into effect. Learn more about the waiting period, why you should have flood insurance, and how to buy it at https://www.floodsmart.gov/.

Related Links

Last Updated: 2019-06-17 04:00