The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) Fiscal Year 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program

Release Date:
May 13, 2022

Download a PDF copy of this webpage.

 Effective April 4, 2022, the Federal Government transitioned from using the Data Universal Numbering System or DUNS number, to a new, non-proprietary identifier known as a Unique Entity Identifier or UEI. For entities that had an active registration in the System for Award Management (SAM) prior to this date, the UEI has automatically been assigned and no action is necessary. For all entities filing a new registration in SAM.gov on or after April 4, 2022, the UEI will be assigned to that entity as part of the SAM.gov registration process.

UEI registration information is available on GSA.gov at: Unique Entity Identifier Update | GSA.

Grants.gov registration information can be found at:https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/register.html. Detailed information regarding UEI and SAM is also provided in Section D of this funding notice.

Table of Contents

  1. Program Description

    1. Issued By
    2. Assistance Listings Number
    3. Assistance Listings Title
    4. Funding Opportunity Title
    5. Funding Opportunity Number
    6. Authorizing Authority for Program
    7. Appropriation Authority for Program
    8. Announcement Type
    9. Program Category
    10. Program Overview, Objectives, and Priorities
    11. Performance Measures
  2. Federal Award Information

    1. Available Funding for the NOFO:    $250,150,000
    2. Projected Number of Awards: 56
    3. Maximum Award Amount:
    4. Period of Performance:      36 months
    5. Projected Period of Performance Start Date(s):  September 1, 2022
    6.  Projected Period of Performance End Date(s): August 31, 2025
    7. Funding Instrument Type:     Grant
  3.  Eligibility Information

    1. Eligible Applicants
    2.  Applicant Eligibility Criteria
    3. Other Eligibility Criteria
    4. Cost Share or Match
  4. Application and Submission Information

    1. Key Dates and Times
    2. Agreeing to Terms and Conditions of the Award
    3.  Address to Request Application Package
    4. Steps Required to Obtain a Unique Entity Identifier, Register in the System for Award Management (SAM), and Submit an Application
    5. Electronic Delivery
    6. How to Register to Apply through Grants.gov
    7. How to Submit an Initial Application to FEMA via Grants.gov
    8. Submitting the Final Application in ND Grants
    9. Timely Receipt Requirements and Proof of Timely Submission
    10. Content and Form of Application Submission
    11. Intergovernmental Review
    12. Funding Restrictions and Allowable Costs
  5.  Application Review Information

    1. Application Evaluation Criteria
    2. Review and Selection Process
  6. Federal Award Administration Information

    1. Notice of Award
    2. Pass-Through Requirements
    3.  Administrative and National Policy Requirements
    4. Reporting
    5. Monitoring and Oversight
  7.  DHS Awarding Agency Contact Information

    1. Contact and Resource Information
    2. Systems Information
  8.  Additional Information

    1. Unique Entity Identifier
    2. Program Evaluation
    3. Period of Performance Extensions

Appendix A: NSGP Subapplicant Quick Start Guide

Appendix B:  NSGP Subapplicant Resources

A.     Program Description

1.      Issued By

U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)/Grant Programs Directorate (GPD)

2.      Assistance Listings Number

97.008

3.      Assistance Listings Title

Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP)

4.      Funding Opportunity Title

Fiscal Year 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program

5.      Funding Opportunity Number

DHS-22-GPD-008-000-01

6.      Authorizing Authority for Program

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2022 (Pub. L. No. 117-103); Sections 2003 and 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. No. 107-296, as amended) (6 U.S.C. §§ 604 and 605)

7.      Appropriation Authority for Program

Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2022 (Pub. L. No. 117-103) 

8.      Announcement Type

Initial

9.      Program Category

Preparedness: Community Security  

10.  Program Overview, Objectives, and Priorities

a. Overview

The Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) is one of three grant programs that support DHS/FEMA’s focus on enhancing the ability of state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as nonprofits, to prevent, protect against, prepare for, and respond to terrorist attacks. These grant programs are part of a comprehensive set of measures authorized by Congress and implemented by DHS to help strengthen the nation’s communities against potential terrorist attacks. Among the five basic homeland security missions noted in the DHS Strategic Plan, NSGP supports the goal to Strengthen National Preparedness and Resilience.

The 2022-2026 FEMA Strategic Plan outlines three bold, ambitious goals in order to position FEMA to address the increasing range and complexity of disasters, support the diversity of communities we serve, and complement the nation’s growing expectations of the emergency management community. The NSGP supports FEMA’s efforts to instill equity as a foundation of emergency management (Goal 1), as well as promote and sustain a ready FEMA and prepared nation (Goal 3). We invite our stakeholders and partners to also adopt these priorities and join us in building a more prepared and resilient nation.

In FY 2022, there are three funding sources appropriated for nonprofit organizations:

  1. NSGP - Urban Area (NSGP-UA): NSGP-UA funds nonprofit organizations located within FY 2022 Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI)-designated high-risk urban areas;
  2. NSGP - State (NSGP-S): NSGP-S funds nonprofit organizations located outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area. Under NSGP-S, each state will receive a target allocation for nonprofit organizations in the state located outside of FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas; and
  3. Community Project Funding (CPF): One state was identified in the FY 2022 DHS Appropriations Act to receive FY 2022 CPF funding, as further outlined in this funding notice.

For FY 2022, DHS is focused on the importance of information sharing and collaboration to building a national culture of preparedness and protecting against terrorism and other threats to our national security. The threats to our nation have evolved during the past two decades. We now face continuous cyber threats by sophisticated actors, threats to soft targets and crowded places, and threats from domestic violent extremists who currently pose the greatest terrorism threat to the nation. Therefore, for FY 2022, we have identified one priority area tied to some of the most serious threats that recipients should address with their NSGP funds. DHS is focused on forging partnerships to strengthen information sharing and collaboration and, while there are no requirements for information sharing between nonprofit organizations and federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement, the NSGP seeks to bring nonprofit organizations into broader state and local preparedness efforts by removing barriers to communication and being more inclusive.

b. Objectives

The objective of the FY 2022 NSGP is to provide funding for physical and cyber security enhancements and other security-related activities to nonprofit organizations that are at high risk of a terrorist attack. The NSGP also seeks to integrate the preparedness activities of nonprofit organizations with broader state and local preparedness efforts.  

c. Priorities

Given the evolving threat landscape, DHS/FEMA has evaluated the national risk profile and set priorities that help ensure appropriate allocation of scarce security dollars. In assessing the national risk profile for FY 2022, one area attracts the most concern under the Non-Profit Security Grant Program:

  1. Enhancing the protection of soft targets/crowded places

Likewise, there are several enduring security needs that crosscut the homeland security enterprise. The following are second-tier priority areas that help recipients implement a comprehensive approach to securing communities:

  1. Effective planning
  2. Training and awareness campaigns
  3. Exercises

The table below provides a breakdown of these priority areas for the FY 2022 NSGP, showing both the core capabilities enhanced and lifelines supported, as well as examples of eligible project types for each area. A detailed description of allowable investments for each project type is included in the Preparedness Grants Manual.

 

FY 2022 NSGP Funding Priorities

National Priorities

Priority Areas Core Capabilities Enhanced Lifelines Example Project Types
Enhancing the Protection of Soft Targets/Crowded Places

Operational coordination

Public information and warning

Intelligence and Information Sharing

Interdiction and disruption

Screening, search, and detection

Access control and identity verification

Physical protective Measures

Risk management for protection

Safety & Security  

Private contracted security guards

Physical security enhancements

Closed circuit television (CCTV) security cameras Security screening equipment for people and baggage

Access controls

Fencing, gates, barriers, etc.

Enduring Needs

Priority Areas Core Capabilities Enhanced Lifelines Example Project Types
Planning

Planning   

Risk management for protection programs & activities

Risk & disaster resilience assessment

Threats and hazards identification

Operational coordination

Safety & Security  

Conduct or enhancement of security risk assessments

Development of: Security plans and protocols

Emergency/contingency plans

Evacuation/shelter in place plans

Assessment of capabilities and gaps in planning for the needs of persons with disabilities and others with access and functional needs

Training & Awareness  

Long-term vulnerability reduction

Public information & warning

Safety & Security  

Active shooter training, including integrating the needs of persons with disabilities

Security training for employees

Public awareness/preparedness campaigns

Exercises  

Long-term vulnerability reduction

Safety & Security

Response exercises

11.  Performance Measures

Performance metrics for this program are as follows:

  • Percentage of funding spent on contract security;
  • Percentage of funding spent on target hardening; and
  • Percentage of funding spent on training and awareness campaigns.

FEMA will calculate and analyze the above metrics through a review of recipient Biannual Strategy Implementation Report updates and award monitoring to ensure that the funds are expended for their intended purpose and achieve the stated outcomes in the grant application.

B.     Federal Award Information

1.      Available Funding for the NOFO:                               $250,150,000

Subtotal for NSGP-UA:                                           $125,000,000

Subtotal for NSGP-S:                                               $125,000,000

Subtotal for CPF:                                                     $150,000

2.      Projected Number of Awards:                                     56

3.      Maximum Award Amount:     

Nonprofit organizations must apply through their respective State Administrative Agency (SAA). For NSGP-UA and NSGP-S, nonprofit subapplicants with one site may apply for up to $150,000 for that site. Nonprofit subapplicants with multiple sites may apply for up to $150,000 per site for up to three sites, for a maximum of $450,000 per subapplicant. If a nonprofit subapplicant applies for projects at multiple sites, regardless of whether the projects are similar in nature, it must include an assessment of the vulnerability and risk unique to each site. Failure to do so may be cause for rejection of the application.

For CPF, the maximum award amount is $150,000.

4.      Period of Performance:                                                36 months

Extensions to the period of performance are allowed. For additional information on period of performance extensions, please refer to Section H of this funding notice or the Preparedness Grants Manual.

FEMA awards under most programs, including this program, only include one budget period, so it will be same as the period of performance. See 2 C.F.R. § 200.1 for definitions of “budget period” and “period of performance.”

5.      Projected Period of Performance Start Date(s):        September 1, 2022

6.      Projected Period of Performance End Date(s):          August 31, 2025

7.      Funding Instrument Type:                                           Grant

C.     Eligibility Information

  1. Eligible Applicants

    Note: Throughout this funding notice, the term “applicant” refers to the SAA, and the term “subapplicant” refers to the nonprofit organization.

    The SAA is the only eligible applicant to apply for funding to FEMA. Nonprofit organizations are eligible as subapplicants to the SAA. As such, nonprofit organizations must apply for FY 2022 NSGP through their SAA, who then submits all application information to FEMA. A list of SAA points of contact is available at: https://www.fema.gov/grants/preparedness/state-administrative-agency-contacts. Nonprofit organizations may not apply directly to DHS/FEMA for FY 2022 NSGP funds.

    Additional information on the subapplicant process specific to nonprofit organizations is included in Section D.10 and Appendix A of this funding notice.

    SAAs, in coordination with the Urban Area Working Groups (UAWG) or other relevant state partners, are encouraged to notify and actively inform eligible nonprofit organizations of the availability of FY 2022 NSGP funding. 

  2.  Applicant Eligibility Criteria

    The SAA is the only eligible applicant. Nonprofit organizations eligible as subapplicants to the SAA are those organizations that are:

    Applying for NSGP-UA versus NSGP-S

    Nonprofit organizations may not apply to FEMA directly. Nonprofit organizations must apply for FY 2022 NSGP through their SAA. A list of SAA points of contact is available at State Administrative Agency (SAA) Contacts | FEMA.gov. Nonprofit organizations should contact the respective SAA to:

    Eligible nonprofit subapplicants located within FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas may apply to the SAA (applicant) to receive funding only under NSGP-UA. Eligible nonprofit organization subapplicants located outside of FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas may apply to the SAA (applicant) to receive funding only under NSGP-S. DHS/FEMA will verify that nonprofit sub-applicants have applied to the correct program and may disqualify the applications of nonprofit sub-applicants that apply to the wrong program.

    For nonprofit organizations that are unsure whether or not they are within a FY 2022 UASI-designated urban area, contact the respective SAA. A list of SAA contacts can be found at https://www.fema.gov/grants/preparedness/state-administrative-agency-contacts.

    If a nonprofit organization has a physical location within a defined Metropolitan Statistical Area but the location is NOT within the bounds of how the UAWG defines the high-risk urban area footprint for the purposes of the UASI grant program, then that location should apply under NSGP-S.

    Nonprofit organizations that have locations both within and outside of UASI-designated high-risk urban areas can apply under both NSGP-UA and NSGP-S depending on the physical location of the facilities. In such cases, the nonprofit subapplicant must submit separate applications for NSGP-UA and NSGP-S to the SAA (applicant) for funding consideration. SAA applicants and nonprofit subapplicants must still adhere to the other restrictions and requirements set forth in this funding notice, including applying for a maximum of three locationstotal per nonprofit organization across both NSGP-UA and NSGP-S, and a maximum of $150,000 per location. If a nonprofit organization has a physical location within a defined Metropolitan Statistical Area but the location is NOT within the bounds of how the UAWG defines the high-risk urban area footprint for the purposes of the UASI grant program, then that location should apply under NSGP-S. Nonprofit organizations should contact their SAAs to determine if their physical location falls within the UAWG-defined high-risk urban area footprint.

    Additionally, the final beneficiary of the NSGP grant award must be an eligible nonprofit organization and cannot be a for-profit/fundraising extension of a nonprofit organization. While these for-profit or fundraising extensions may be associated with the eligible nonprofit organization, NSGP funding cannot be used to benefit those extensions and therefore they will be considered ineligible applications. If the funding being sought is for the benefit of a for-profit/fundraising extension, then that would constitute an ineligible subaward since only nonprofit organizations are eligible subrecipients. This is distinct from a contract under an award where a nonprofit organization could seek the assistance of a for-profit/fundraising extension, but the purpose would be to benefit the nonprofit organization and not for the benefit of the for-profit/fundraising extension. For further information on the distinction between a subaward and contract, see 2 C.F.R. § 200.331.

    An application submitted by an otherwise eligible non-federal entity (which for this program is the SAA) may be deemed ineligible when the person that submitted the application (for the applicant/SAA) is not: 1) a current employee, personnel, official, staff, or leadership of the non-federal entity; and 2) duly authorized to apply for an award on behalf of the non-federal entity at the time of application. Further, the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) must be a duly authorized current employee, personnel, official, staff or leadership of the recipient and provide an email address unique to the recipient (SAA) at the time of application and upon any change in assignment during the period of performance. Consultants or contractors of the recipient are not permitted to be the AOR of the recipient.

     

    FY 2022 NSGP-UA Eligible High-Risk Urban Areas
    State/Territory High-Risk Urban Area
    Arizona Phoenix Area
    California Anaheim/Santa Ana Area
    California Bay Area
    California Los Angeles/Long Beach Area
    California Riverside Area
    California Sacramento Area
    California San Diego Area
    Colorado Denver Area
    District of Columbia National Capital Region
    Florida Miami/Fort Lauderdale Area
    Florida Orlando Area
    Florida Tampa Area
    Georgia Atlanta Area
    Illinois Chicago Area
    Indiana Indianapolis Area
    Louisiana New Orleans Area
    Maryland Baltimore Area
    Massachusetts Boston Area
    Michigan Detroit Area
    Minnesota Twin Cities Area
    Missouri Kansas City Area
    Missouri St. Louis Area
    Nevada Las Vegas Area
    New Jersey Jersey City/Newark Area
    New York New York City Area
    North Carolina Charlotte Area
    Ohio Cincinnati Area
    Ohio Cleveland Area
    Oregon Portland Area
    Pennsylvania Philadelphia Area
    Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Area
    Texas Dallas/Fort Worth/Arlington Area
    Texas Houston Area
    Texas San Antonio Area
    Virginia Hampton Roads Area
    Washington Seattle Area

     

    FY 2022 NSGP-S Target Allocations
    State/Territory FY 2022 Target Allocation 5% for M&A based on Target Allocation State/Territory FY 2022 Target Allocation 5% for M&A based on Target Allocation
    Alabama $2,850,000 $142,500 Montana $1,350,000 $67,500
    Alaska $1,200,000 $60,000 Nebraska $1,650,000 $82,500
    American Samoa $1,050,000 $52,500 Nevada $1,350,000 $67,500
    Arizona $1,950,000 $97,500 New Hampshire $1,500,000 $75,000
    Arkansas $2,100,000 $105,000 New Jersey $1,800,000 $90,000
    California $5,717,000 $285,850 New Mexico $1,800,000 $90,000
    Colorado $1,950,000 $97,500 New York $3,750,000 $187,500
    Connecticut $2,250,000 $112,500 North Carolina $3,900,000 $195,000
    Delaware $1,350,000 $67,500 North Dakota $1,350,000 $67,500
    District of Columbia - - Northern Mariana Islands $1,050,000 $52,500
    Florida $4,050,000 $202,500 Ohio $4,066,000 $203,300
    Georgia $3,450,000 $172,500 Oklahoma $2,400,000 $120,000
    Guam $1,050,000 $52,500 Oregon $1,800,000 $90,000
    Hawaii $1,500,000 $75,000 Pennsylvania $3,150,000 $157,500
    Idaho $1,650,000 $82,500 Puerto Rico $2,250,000 $112,500
    Illinois $3,450,000 $172,500 Rhode Island $1,350,000 $67,500
    Indiana $2,700,000 $135,000 South Carolina $2,700,000 $135,000
    Iowa $2,100,000 $105,000 South Dakota $1,350,000 $67,500
    Kansas $1,800,000 $90,000 Tennessee $3,450,000 $172,500
    Kentucky $2,550,000 $127,500 Texas $5,567,000 $278,350
    Louisiana $2,400,000 $120,000 U.S. Virgin Islands $1,050,000 $52,500
    Maine $1,500,000 $75,000 Utah $2,250,000 $112,500
    Maryland $1,500,000 $75,000 Vermont $1,200,000 $60,000
    Massachusetts $3,150,000 $157,500 Virginia $2,550,000 $127,500
    Michigan $3,000,000 $150,000 Washington $2,100,000 $105,000
    Minnesota $1,800,000 $90,000 West Virginia $1,650,000 $82,500
    Mississippi $2,100,000 $105,000 Wisconsin $3,150,000 $157,500
    Missouri $2,100,000 $105,000 Wyoming $1,200,000 $60,000

     

    FY 2022 CPF Allocation
    State/Territory Nonprofit Organization Subrecipient FY 2022 Allocation
    New Jersey Beth Medrash Govoha of America $150,000
           

    3.      Cost Share or Match

    There is no cost share requirement for the FY 2022 NSGP. Applicants that propose a cost share will not receive additional consideration in the scoring.

    D.     Application and Submission Information

    1.      Key Dates and Times

    a.      Application Start Date:                                                    May 13, 2022

    b.      Application Submission Deadline:                                  June 13, 2022 at 5 p.m. ET

    All applications must be received by the established deadline.

    The SAA application deadline to apply to FEMA is June 13, 2022, at 5 p.m. ET. Nonprofit applications are due to the SAA BEFORE the application submission deadline for the SAA. Nonprofit organizations must contact the SAA for the state/territory deadline. SAAs establish all requirements and deadlines to manage their nonprofit sub-application process in support of their submissions to DHS/FEMA. Deadlines and SAA requirements may vary from state/territory to state/territory. Section D.10 and Appendix A contain information specific for the nonprofit organization sub-applicant process as it relates to FEMA NSGP application requirements. However, nonprofit organizations must work with their SAAs to determine state/territory-specific application requirements and deadlines.

    The Non-Disaster (ND) Grants System has a date stamp that indicates when an application is submitted. SAA applicants will receive an electronic message confirming receipt of their submission. For additional information on how an applicant will be notified of application receipt, see the subsection titled “Timely Receipt Requirements and Proof of Timely Submission” in Section D of this funding notice.

    FEMA will not review SAA applications that are received after the deadline or consider late applications for funding. FEMA may, however, extend the SAA application deadline on request for any SAA applicant who can demonstrate that good cause exists to justify extending the deadline. Good cause for an extension may include technical problems outside of the SAA applicant’s control that prevent submission of the application by the deadline, other exigent or emergency circumstances, or statutory requirements for FEMA to make an award.

    SAA applicants experiencing technical problems outside of their control must notify FEMA as soon as possible and before the application deadline. Failure to timely notify FEMA of the issue that prevented the timely filing of the application may preclude consideration of the award. “Timely notification” of FEMA means prior to the application deadline and within 48 hours after the applicant became aware of the issue.

    A list of FEMA contacts can be found in Section G of this funding notice, “DHS Awarding Agency Contact Information.” For additional assistance using the ND Grants System, please contact the ND Grants Service Desk at (800) 865-4076 or NDGrants@fema.dhs.gov. The ND Grants Service Desk is available Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. ET. For programmatic or grants management questions, please contact your Program Analyst or Grants Specialist. If applicants do not know who to contact or if there are programmatic questions or concerns, please contact the Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (CSID) by phone at (800) 368-6498 or by e-mail at askcsid@fema.dhs.gov, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ET.

    Event Suggested Applicant Deadline for Completion
    Obtaining an UEI number Four weeks before actual submission deadline
    Obtaining a valid Employer Identification Number (EIN) Four weeks before actual submission deadline
    Creating an account with login.gov Four weeks before actual submission deadline
    Registering in SAM or updating SAM registration Four weeks before actual submission deadline
    Registering in Grants.gov Four weeks before actual submission deadline
    Starting application in Grants.gov One week before actual submission deadline
    Submitting the final application in ND Grants By the submission deadline

    2.      Agreeing to Terms and Conditions of the Award

    By submitting an application, SAA applicants agree to comply with the requirements of this funding notice and the terms and conditions of the award, should they receive an award.

    3.      Address to Request Application Package

    See the Preparedness Grants Manual for requesting and submitting an application.

    Initial applications are processed through the Grants.gov  portal. Final applications are completed and submitted through FEMA’s Non-Disaster Grants (ND Grants) System. Application forms and instructions are available at Grants.gov. To access these materials, go to http://www.grants.gov.

    4.      Steps Required to Obtain a Unique Entity Identifier, Register in the System for Award Management (SAM), and Submit an Application

    Applying for an award under this program is a multi-step process and requires time to complete. Applicants are encouraged to register early as the registration process can take four weeks or more to complete. Therefore, registration should be done in sufficient time to ensure it does not impact your ability to meet required submission deadlines.

    Please review the table above for estimated deadlines to complete each of the steps listed. Failure of an applicant to comply with any of the required steps before the deadline for submitting an application may disqualify that application from funding.

    To apply for an award under this program, all applicants must:

    Specific instructions on how to apply for, update, or verify an UEI number or SAM registration or establish an AOR are included below in the steps for applying through Grants.gov. 

    Note: Nonprofit organization sub-applicants applying for NSGP funding through the SAA must have a UEI. Nonprofit organizations must register in SAM.gov to obtain the UEI but are not required to maintain an active registration in SAM. Further guidance on obtaining a UEI in SAM.gov can be found at GSA UEI Update and SAM.gov Update. Nonprofit sub-applicants are also reminded that if they have previously applied for another federal grant, they should use the same UEI and EIN from those prior applications to save time.

    Applicants are advised that FEMA may not make a federal award until the SAA applicant has complied with all applicable SAM requirements. Therefore, an SAA applicant’s SAM registration must be active not only at the time of application, but also during the application review period and when FEMA is ready to make a federal award. Further, as noted above, an SAA applicant’s or SAA recipient’s SAM registration must remain active for the duration of an active federal award. If an applicant’s SAM registration is expired at the time of application, expires during application review, or expires any other time before award, FEMA may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a federal award and use that determination as a basis for making a federal award to another applicant.

    Per 2 C.F.R. § 25.110(c)(2)(iii), if an SAA applicant is experiencing exigent circumstances that prevents it from receiving completing SAM registration prior to receiving a federal award, the applicant must notify FEMA as soon as possible by contacting askcsid@fema.dhs.gov and providing the details of the circumstances that prevent completion of these requirements. If FEMA determines that there are exigent circumstances and FEMA has decided to make an award, the SAA applicant will be required to obtain an UEI number, if applicable, and complete SAM registration within 30 days of the federal award date.

    5.      Electronic Delivery

    DHS is participating in the Grants.gov initiative to provide the grant community with a single site to find and apply for grant funding opportunities. DHS encourages or requires applicants to submit their applications online through Grants.gov, depending on the funding opportunity.

    For this funding opportunity, FEMA requires applicants to submit initial applications through Grants.gov and a final application through ND Grants.

    6.      How to Register to Apply through Grants.gov

    For information on how to register to apply through Grants.gov, please see the Preparedness Grants Manual.

    7.      How to Submit an Initial Application to FEMA via Grants.gov

    Standard Form 424 (SF-424) is the initial application for this funding notice.

    Grants.gov applicants can apply online using a workspace. A workspace is a shared, online environment where members of a grant team may simultaneously access and edit different web forms within an application. For each Notice of Funding Opportunity, you can create individual instances of a workspace. Applicants are encouraged to submit their initial applications in Grants.gov at least seven days before the application deadline.

    In Grants.gov, applicants need to submit the following forms:

    For further information on how to submit an initial application via Grants.gov, please see the Preparedness Grants Manual.

    8.      Submitting the Final Application in ND Grants

    After submitting the initial application in Grants.gov, eligible applicants will be notified by FEMA and asked to proceed with submitting their complete application package in ND Grants. Applicants can register early with ND Grants and are encouraged to begin their ND Grants registration at the time of this announcement or, at the latest, seven days before the application deadline. Early registration will allow applicants to have adequate time to start and complete their applications.

    Applicants needing assistance registering for the ND Grants system should contact ndgrants@fema.dhs.gov or (800) 865-4076. For step-by-step directions on using the ND Grants system and other guides, please see https://www.fema.gov/grants/guidance-tools/non- disaster-grants-management-system.

    In ND Grants, applicants will be prompted to submit the standard application information and any program-specific information required as described in Section D.10 of this funding notice, “Content and Form of Application Submission.” The Standard Forms (SF) are auto generated in ND Grants, but applicants may access these forms in advance through the Forms tab under the SF-424 family on Grants.gov. Applicants should review these forms before applying to ensure they have all the information required.

    For additional application submission requirements, including program-specific requirements, please refer to the subsection titled “Content and Form of Application Submission” under Section D of this funding notice.

    9.      Timely Receipt Requirements and Proof of Timely Submission

    As application submission is a two-step process, the applicant with the AOR role who submitted the application in Grants.gov will receive an acknowledgement of receipt and a tracking number (GRANTXXXXXXXX) from Grants.gov with the successful transmission of its initial application. This notification does not serve as proof of timely submission, as the application is not complete until it is submitted in ND Grants. Applicants can also view the ND Grants Agency Tracking Number by accessing the Details tab in the submitted workspace section in Grants.gov, under the Agency Tracking Number column. Should the Agency Tracking Number not appear, the application has not yet migrated from Grants.gov into the ND Grants System. Please allow 24 hours for your ND Grants application tracking number to migrate.

    All applications must be received in ND Grants by 5 p.m. ET on the application deadline. Proof of timely submission is automatically recorded by ND Grants. An electronic date/time stamp is generated within the system when the application is successfully received by ND Grants. Additionally, the applicant(s) listed as contacts on the application will receive a system-generated email to confirm receipt.

    10.  Content and Form of Application Submission

    a.      Standard Required Application Forms and Information

    The following forms or information are required to be submitted in either Grants.gov or ND Grants. The Standard Forms (SF) are submitted either through Grants.gov, through forms generated in ND Grants, or as an attachment in ND Grants. Applicants may also access the SFs at https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/forms/sf-424-family.html.

    • NSGP-S Target Allocation
    • Submit IJs That Total This Amount to DHS/FEMA
    • $1.4 million
    • $2.1 million
    • $2 million
    • $3 million
    • $2.5 million
    • $3.75 million

     

     
    1. Described under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (IRC) and exempt from tax under section 501(a) of such code.

      Note: The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not require certain organizations such as churches, mosques, and synagogues to apply for and receive a recognition of exemption under section 501(c)(3) of the IRC. Such organizations are automatically exempt if they meet the requirements of section 501(c)(3). These organizations are not required to provide recognition of exemption. For organizations that the IRS requires to apply for and receive a recognition of exemption under section 501(c)(3), the state may or may not require recognition of exemption, as long as the method chosen is applied consistently.

      Refer to links below for additional information:

    2. Able to demonstrate, through the application, that the organization is at high risk of a terrorist attack; and
    3. For NSGP-UA, located within a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area; or for NSGP-S, located outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area.
    • Verify the SAA’s application deadline. SAAs establish all requirements and deadlines to manage their nonprofit sub-application process in support of the SAAs’ submissions to DHS/FEMA. Deadlines and state requirements may vary from state to state. The deadline published in this funding notice is for the SAA to apply to DHS/FEMA, not for the nonprofit organization to apply to the SAA.
    • Obtain information on any additional state requirements or processes.
    • Anticipated Funding Selection Date:                              No later than August 17, 2022
    • Anticipated Award Date:                                                 No later than September 30, 2022
    • Other Key Dates:
    1. Apply for, update or verify their UEI number from SAM.gov and Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the Internal Revenue Service;
      • In the application, provide an UEI;
      • Have an account with login.gov;
      • Register for, update, or verify their SAM account and ensure the account is active before submitting the application;
      • Create a Grants.gov account;
      • Add a profile to a Grants.gov account;
      • Establish an Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR) in Grants.gov;
      • Register in ND Grants
      • Submit an initial application in Grants.gov;
      • Submit the final application in ND Grants, including electronically signing applicable forms; and
      • Continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active federal award or an application or plan under consideration by a federal awarding agency. As part of this, applicants must also provide information on an applicant’s immediate and highest-level owner and subsidiaries, as well as on all predecessors that have been awarded federal contracts or federal financial assistance within the last three years, if applicable.
    • SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance
    • Grants.gov Lobbying Form, Certification Regarding Lobbying
  • GRANTS.GOV
    • SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance, initial application submitted through Grants.gov Grants.gov Lobbying Form, Certification Regarding Lobbying, submitted through Grants.gov
    •  
  • ND GRANTS
  • SF-424A, Budget Information (Non-Construction), submitted via the forms generated by ND Grants
  • For construction under an award, submit SF-424C, Budget Information (Construction), submitted via the forms generated by ND Grants, in addition to or instead of SF-424A
    • To comply with 2 C.F.R. § 200.402 - 2 C.F.R. § 200.405, NSGP applicants must complete and submit an SF-424A or SF-424C, as appropriate, reflecting cost breakdown per budget cost categories per sub-programs (NSGP-S and NSGP-UA) and  Management and Administration costs as applicable to align with the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice.  The SF-424A or SF-424C with the pre-filled requirements can be found with the NSGP funding notice and associated attachments on grants.gov. Adjustments to the SF-424A or SF-424C maybe required after the FY 2022 NSGP final allocation announcements are made. GPD Grants Management Specialists will contact applicants for any necessary revisions. 
  • SF-424B, Standard Assurances (Non-Construction), submitted via the forms generated by ND Grants
    • For construction under an award, submit SF-424D, Standard Assurances (Construction), submitted via the forms generated by ND Grants, in addition to or instead of SF-424B
  • SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activities, submitted via the forms generated by ND Grants
  • Indirect Cost Agreement or Proposal, submitted as an attachment in ND Grants if the budget includes indirect costs and the applicant is required to have an indirect cost rate agreement or proposal. If the applicant does not have or is not required to have an indirect cost rate agreement or proposal, please see Section D.13 of this funding notice, “Funding Restrictions and Allowable Costs,” for further information regarding allowability of indirect costs and whether alternatives to an indirect cost rate agreement or proposal might be available or contact the relevant FEMA staff identified in Section G of this funding notice, “DHS Awarding Agency Contact Information” for further instructions.

 

Generally, applicants have to submit either the non-construction forms (i.e., SF-424A and SF-424B) or construction forms (i.e., SF-424C and SF-424D), meaning that applicants that only have construction work and do not have any non-construction work need only submit the construction forms (i.e., SF-424C and SF-424D) and not the non-construction forms (i.e., SF-424A and SF-424B), and vice versa. However, applicants who have both construction and non-construction work under this program need to submit both the construction and non- construction forms.

b.      Program-Specific Required Forms and Information

  • The following program-specific forms or information are required to be submitted in ND Grants:
  • Investment Justifications (IJ) only from eligible nonprofit subapplicants that meet the following criteria:
  • Are recommended for funding by the SAA;
  • Are for no more than $150,000 per site, for no more than three sites, for a maximum of $450,000 per eligible nonprofit;
  • Include only one site per IJ;
  • Have a physical address (not a PO Box Number); and
  • Are for location(s) that the nonprofit occupies at the time of application.
  • SAA Prioritization of IJs in the DHS/FEMA-provided template (OMB Control Number: 1660-0110/FEMA Form FF-207-FY-21-114) located in the Related Documents tab of the Grants.gov posting:
    • SAAs must submit a Prioritization of IJs for NSGP-UA and a separate Prioritization of IJs for NSGP-S;
    • SAAs must include nonprofit organization application details (e.g., nonprofit organization name, IJ title(s), requested amount(s)) for each nonprofit organization that applied to the SAA for funding on the State Prioritization of IJs even if not being recommended by the SAA for funding. IJs for applications not being recommended for funding should not be submitted to FEMA;
    • Each nonprofit organization being recommended for funding must be scored and must have a unique rank (#1 [one] being the highest ranked through the total number of applications the SAA scored); and
    • States with multiple FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas must ensure that nonprofits are ranked by high-risk urban area. For example, if a state has three high-risk urban areas, there should be three groups of rankings.

 

  • Nonprofit Organization Specific Application Instructions
  • As part of the FY 2022 NSGP application, each eligible nonprofit subapplicant must submit the following three documents to the SAA by the deadline established by the SAA:
    • NSGP IJ
    • Nonprofit subapplicants with one site may apply for up to $150,000 for that site. Nonprofit subapplicants with multiple sites may apply for up to $150,000 per site, for up to three sites, for a maximum of 450,000 per nonprofit subapplicant. If a nonprofit subapplicant applies for multiple sites, it must submit one complete IJ for each site. A fillable IJ form (DHS/FEMA Form FF-207-FY-21-115, OMB Control Number: 1660-0110) is available in the Related Documents tab of the Grants.gov NSGP posting. The IJ must describe each investment proposed for funding. The investments or projects described in the IJ must:  
      • Be for the location(s) that the nonprofit occupies at the time of application;
      • Address an identified risk, including threat and vulnerability, and build or sustain a core capability identified in the National Preparedness Goal for that site, regardless of whether it is submitting for similar projects at multiple sites;
      • Demonstrate the ability to provide enhancements consistent with the purpose of the program and guidance provided by DHS/FEMA;
      • Be both feasible and effective at reducing the risks for which the project was designed;
      • Be able to be fully completed within the three-year period of performance; and
      • Be consistent with all applicable requirements outlined in the funding notice and the Preparedness Grants Manual.

Nonprofit subapplicants are required to self-identify with one of the following four categories in the IJ as part of the application process:

  1. Ideology-based/Spiritual/Religious
  2. Educational
  3. Medical
  4. Other
  • Vulnerability/Risk Assessment (NSGP-S and NSGP-UA only) Each nonprofit subapplicant must include a vulnerability/risk assessment unique to the site the IJ is being submitted for.

 

  • Mission Statement (NSGP-S and NSGP-UA only) Each nonprofit subapplicant must include its Mission Statement and any mission implementation policies or practices that may elevate the organization’s risk. SAAs will use the Mission Statement along with the nonprofit sub-applicant’s self-identification in the IJ to validate that the organization is one of the following types: 1) Ideology-based/Spiritual/Religious; 2) Educational; 3) Medical; or 4) Other. The organization type is a factor when calculating the final score of the application; see Section E Application Review Information, subsection Final Score. The Vulnerability/Risk Assessment and the Mission Statement are not to be submitted in ND Grants but should be maintained by the SAA and must be made available to DHS/FEMA upon request.

11.  Intergovernmental Review

An intergovernmental review may be required. Applicants must contact their state’s Single Point of Contact (SPOC) to comply with the state’s process under Executive Order 12372 (See https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/codification/executive-order/12372.html; https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/SPOC-4-13-20.pdf).

12.  Funding Restrictions and Allowable Costs

All costs charged to awards covered by this funding notice must comply with the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements at 2 C.F.R. Part 200, unless otherwise indicated in the funding notice, the terms and conditions of the award, or the Preparedness Grants Manual. This includes, among other requirements, that costs must be incurred, and products and services must be delivered, within the period of performance of the award. See 2 C.F.R. § 200.403(h) (referring to budget periods, which for FEMA awards under this program is the same as the period of performance).

Federal funds made available through this award may be used for the purpose set forth in this funding notice, the Preparedness Grants Manual, and the terms and conditions of the award and must be consistent with the statutory authority for the award. Award funds may not be used for matching funds for any other federal awards, lobbying, or intervention in federal regulatory or adjudicatory proceedings. In addition, federal funds may not be used to sue the Federal Government or any other government entity. See the Preparedness Grants Manual for more information on funding restrictions and allowable costs.

a.      Prohibitions on Expending FEMA Award Funds for Covered Telecommunications Equipment or Services

  • Recipients and subrecipients of FEMA federal financial assistance are subject to the prohibitions described in section 889 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (FY 2019 NDAA), Pub. L. No. 115-232 (2018) and 2 C.F.R. §§ 200.216, 200.327, 200.471, and Appendix II to 2 C.F.R. Part 200. Beginning August 13, 2020, the statute – as it applies to FEMA recipients, subrecipients, and their contractors and subcontractors – prohibits obligating or expending federal award funds on certain telecommunications and video surveillance products and contracting with certain entities for national security reasons.
  • Guidance is available at Prohibitions on Expending FEMA Award Funds for Covered Telecommunications Equipment or Services (Interim) FEMA Policy #405-143-1, or superseding document.
  • Additional guidance is available Contract Provisions Guide: Navigating Appendix II to Part 200 - Contract Provisions for Non-Federal Entity Contracts Under Federal Awards (fema.gov).
  • Effective August 13, 2020, FEMA recipients and subrecipients may not use any FEMA funds under open or new awards to:
  • Procure or obtain any equipment, system, or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology of any system;
  • Enter into, extend, or renew a contract to procure or obtain any equipment, system, or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology of any system; or
  • Enter into, extend, or renew contracts with entities that use covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology as part of any system.

I.        REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES

  • FEMA grant funding may be permitted to procure replacement equipment and services impacted by this prohibition, provided the costs are otherwise consistent with the requirements of the funding notice, the Preparedness Grants Manual, and any other state-specific requirements as defined by each SAA.

 

II. DEFINITIONS

  • Per section 889(f)(2)-(3) of the FY 2019 NDAA and 2 C.F.R. § 200.216, covered telecommunications equipment or services means:
  • Telecommunications equipment produced by Huawei Technologies Company or ZTE Corporation, (or any subsidiary or affiliate of such entities);
  • For the purpose of public safety, security of Government facilities, physical security surveillance of critical infrastructure, and other national security purposes, video surveillance and telecommunications equipment produced by Hytera Communications Corporation, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Company, or Dahua Technology Company (or any subsidiary or affiliate of such entities);
  • Telecommunications or video surveillance services provided by such entities or using such equipment; or
  • Telecommunications or video surveillance equipment or services produced or provided by an entity that the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, reasonably believes to be an entity owned or controlled by, or otherwise connected to, the People’s Republic of China.
  • Examples of the types of products covered by this prohibition include phones, internet, video surveillance, and cloud servers when produced, provided, or used by the entities listed in the definition of “covered telecommunications equipment or services.” See 2 C.F.R. § 200.471.

b.      Pre-Award Costs

  • Pre-award costs are generally not allowable for this program. However, certain pre-award costs can be allowable only with the prior written approval of DHS/FEMA and only if the costs are included in the award agreement. To request pre-award costs, a written request must be included with the application and signed by the AOR. The request letter must outline what the pre-award costs are for, including a detailed budget breakout of pre-award costs from the post-award costs, and a justification for approval. Please note that pre-award security expenses are not allowable. Pre-award costs resulting from pre-award grant writing services provided by an independent contractor that shall not exceed $1,500 are allowed, as detailed in this funding notice.

c.       Management and Administration (M&A) Costs

M&A costs are for activities directly related to the management and administration of the award. M&A activities are those defined as directly relating to the management and administration of NSGP funds, such as financial management and monitoring. M&A expenses must be based on actual expenses or known contractual costs. Requests that are simple percentages of the award, without supporting justification, will not be allowed or considered for reimbursement.

M&A costs are not operational costs, they are the necessary costs incurred in direct support of the grant or as a result of the grant and should be allocated across the entire lifecycle of the grant. Examples include preparing and submitting required programmatic and financial reports, establishing and/or maintaining equipment inventory, documenting operational and equipment expenditures for financial accounting purposes, and responding to official informational requests from state and federal oversight authorities.

Note: SAAs must be able to separately account for M&A costs associated with the NSGP-UA award from those associated with the NSGP-S award.

M&A costs are allowed under this program as described below:

  • The SAA may use and expend up to 5% of their total FY 2022 NSGP-UA award for M&A purposes associated with administering the NSGP-UA award. SAAs must include the amount they are requesting for NSGP-UA M&A in the SF-424A form. The amount should be in addition to the total requested by the subapplicant nonprofit organizations, but not exceed 5% of the total requested by the subapplicant nonprofit organizations.  
  • The SAA may use and expend up to 5% of their total FY 2022 NSGP-S award for M&A purposes associated with administering the NSGP-S award. SAAs must include the amount they are requesting for NSGP-S M&A in the SF-424A form. The amount should be in addition to the total requested by the subapplicant nonprofit organizations, but not exceed 5% of the total requested by the subapplicant nonprofit organizations.  
  • Nonprofit organizations that receive a subaward under this program may use and expend up to 5% of their FY 2022 NSGP funds for M&A purposes associated with the subaward.

d.      Indirect Facilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs

  • Indirect costs are allowable under this program as described in 2 C.F.R. Part 200, including 2C.F.R. § 200.414. Applicants with a current negotiated indirect cost rate agreement that desire to charge indirect costs to an award must provide a copy of their negotiated indirect cost rate agreement at the time of application. Not all applicants are required to have a current negotiated indirect cost rate agreement. Applicants that are not required by 2 C.F.R. Part 200 to have a negotiated indirect cost rate agreement but are required by 2 C.F.R. Part 200 to develop an indirect cost rate proposal must provide a copy of their proposal at the time of application. Applicants who do not have a current negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (including a provisional rate) and wish to charge the de minimis rate must reach out to the FEMA Grants Management Specialist for further instructions. Applicants who wish to use a cost allocation plan in lieu of an indirect cost rate must also reach out to the FEMA Grants Management Specialist for further instructions. Post-award requests to charge indirect costs will be considered on a case-by-case basis and based upon the submission of an agreement or proposal as discussed above or based upon on the de minimis rate or cost allocation plan, as applicable.

e.       Other Direct Costs

  1. Planning Planning costs are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual.
  2. Organization Organization costs are not allowed under this program.
  3. Equipment Equipment costs are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual. Applicants should analyze the costs and benefits of purchasing versus leasing equipment, especially high-cost items and those subject to rapid technical advances. Large equipment purchases must be identified and explained. For more information regarding property management standards for equipment, please reference 2 C.F.R. § 200.313, located at Property Standards in the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (eCFR). Additionally, recipients that are using NGP funds to support emergency communications equipment activities must comply with the SAFECOM Guidance on Emergency Communications Grants, including provisions on technical standards that ensure and enhance interoperable communications.
  4. Maintenance and sustainment Maintenance and sustainment costs, such as maintenance contracts, warranties, repair or replacement costs, upgrades, and user fees are allowable. For additional information, see the Preparedness Grants Manual.  
  5. Training Training costs are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual.  
  6. Exercises Exercise costs are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual.  
  7. Construction and Renovation Construction and renovation costs are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual. For construction costs to be allowed, they must be specifically approved by DHS/FEMA in writing prior to the use of any program funds for construction or renovation. Limits on the total amount of grant funding that may be used for construction or renovation may apply. See the Preparedness Grants Manual for additional information on construction and renovation.  
  8. Operational Overtime Operational overtime costs are not allowed under this program.
  9. Contracted Security Contracted security personnel are allowed under this program only as described in this funding notice and the accompanying appendix in the Preparedness Grants Manual. The nonprofit organization must be able to sustain this capability in future years without NSGP funding, and a sustainment plan will be required as part of the closeout package for any award funding this capability. Contracted security costs described in the IJ should include the hourly/daily rate, the number of personnel, and anticipated number of hours/days the personnel will work over the course of the period of performance. NSGP funds may not be used to purchase equipment for contracted security. Additionally, NSGP recipients and subrecipients may not use more than 50% of their awards to pay for personnel activities unless a waiver is approved by FEMA. For more information on the 50% personnel cap and applicable procedures for seeking a waiver, please see FEMA Information Bulletin No. 421b, Clarification on the Personnel Reimbursement for Intelligence Cooperation and Enhancement of Homeland Security Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-412 – the PRICE Act).

E.     Application Review Information

1.      Application Evaluation Criteria

a.      Programmatic Criteria

  • Nonprofit organizations must submit their FY 2022 NSGP applications to their respective SAA by the deadline established by the SAA. If an SAA has established deadline that is prior to release of the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice, the SAA is responsible for working with any nonprofits that may need to amend their submissions to account for changes in the FY 2022 NSGP program prior to the start of the evaluation process. NSGP-S and NSGP-UA FY 2022 NSGP applications will be reviewed through a two-phase state and federal review process for completeness, adherence to programmatic guidelines, feasibility, and how well the IJ (project description and justification) addresses the identified risk(s). For FY 2022 NSGP-S, SAAs will make recommendations to DHS/FEMA based on their target allocation and according to the chart listed in the NSGP-S Process subsection below.

The following are the FY 2022 NSGP-S and NSGP-UA evaluation process and criteria:

  • For NSGP-UA, state and federal verification that the nonprofit organization is located within one of the FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas (contact the appropriate SAA for the UAWG-defined high-risk urban area footprints); and for NSPG-S, verification that the nonprofit is located outside of one of the FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas;
  • Identification and substantiation of current or persistent threats or attacks (from within or outside the United States) by a terrorist organization, network, or cell against the applicant based on their ideology, beliefs, and/or mission as: 1) an ideology-based/spiritual/religious; 2) educational; 3) medical; or 4) other nonprofit entity;
  • Symbolic value of the site(s) as a highly recognized regional and/or national or historical institution(s) that renders the site a possible target of terrorism;
  • Role of the applicant nonprofit organization in responding to or recovering from terrorist attacks;
  • Alignment between the project activities requested within the physical vulnerabilities identified in the organization’s vulnerability assessment;
  • Integration of nonprofit preparedness with broader state and local preparedness efforts;
  • Completed IJ for each site that addresses an identified risk unique to that site, including the assessed threat, vulnerability, and consequence of the risk, and proposes building or sustaining a core capability identified in the National Preparedness Goal;
  • Demonstration that the nonprofit organization is located within an underserved or disadvantaged community; see Section E, Application Review Information – Review and Selection Process, for additional information on how this demonstration will affect scores; and
  • History of prior funding under NSGP. Not having received prior year NSGP funding is a positive factor when calculating the state score of the application; see Section E, Application Review Information – Review and Selection Process, for additional information.

Grant projects must be: 1) both feasible and effective at mitigating the identified vulnerability and thus reducing the risks for which the project was designed; and 2) able to be fully completed within the three-year period of performance. DHS/FEMA will use the information provided in the application, as well as any supporting documentation, to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of the grant project. Information that would assist in the feasibility and effectiveness determination includes the following:

  • Scope of work (purpose and objectives of the project, identification of what is being protected);
  • Desired outcomes, including expected long-term impact where applicable;
  • Summary of status of planning and design accomplished to date (e.g., included in a capital improvement plan); and
  • Project schedule.
  • Recipients and subrecipients are expected to conform, as applicable, with accepted engineering practices, established codes, standards, modeling techniques, and best practices.

b.      Financial Integrity Criteria

Prior to making a federal award, FEMA is required by 31 U.S.C. § 3354, as enacted by the Payment Integrity Information Act of 2019, Pub. L. No. 116-117 (2020); 41 U.S.C. § 2313; and 2 C.F.R. § 200.206 to review information available through any Office of Management and Budget (OMB)-designated repositories of governmentwide eligibility qualification or financial integrity information, including whether the applicant is suspended or debarred.

FEMA may also pose additional questions to the applicant to aid in conducting the pre-award risk review. Therefore, application evaluation criteria may include the following risk-based considerations of the applicant:

  • Financial stability.
  • Quality of management systems and ability to meet management standards.
  • History of performance in managing federal award.
  • Reports and findings from audits.
  • Ability to effectively implement statutory, regulatory or other requirements.

c.       Supplemental Financial Integrity Criteria and Review

Prior to making a federal award where the anticipated total federal share will be greater than the simplified acquisition threshold, currently $250,000:

  • FEMA is required to review and consider any information about the applicant, including information on the applicant’s immediate and highest-level owner, subsidiaries, and predecessors, if applicable, that is in the designated integrity and performance system accessible through the System for Award Management (SAM), which is currently the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS).
  • An applicant, at its option, may review information in FAPIIS and comment on any information about itself that a federal awarding agency previously entered.
  • FEMA will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant’s integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 C.F.R. § 200.206.

 

d. Security Review

DHS Intelligence and Analysis receives a list of potential NSGP subrecipient organizations, which it reviews against U.S. intelligence community reporting. The security review occurs after the competitive scoring and selection process is complete. The information provided for the security review is limited to the nonprofit organization’s name and physical address, as submitted by the nonprofit organization. Any potentially derogatory information, as well as any potentially mitigating information, that could assist in determining whether a security risk exists is sent to FEMA and is used in making final award decisions.

2.      Review and Selection Process

CPF Process

The CPF project will be reviewed by FEMA to ensure the project’s adherence to programmatic guidelines, cost allowability, and budget completeness.

NSGP-UA Process

State Review

Application packages are submitted by the nonprofit organization to the SAA based on the established criteria. As part of the review for NSGP-UA, the SAAs must:

  • Conduct an eligibility review, in coordination with the UAWG;
  • Verify that the nonprofit is located within a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area;
  • Review and score only complete application packages (including mission statements and vulnerability assessments) using the NSGP Scoring Worksheet provided by DHS/FEMA.
  • Validate the self-certified organization type listed in the IJ by assessing the central purpose of the organization described in the mission statement;
  • Prioritize all NSGP IJs by ranking each IJ. Each IJ will receive a unique rank (#1 [one] being the highest ranked through the total number of applications the SAA scored);
  • For states with multiple FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas, each high-risk urban area must be ranked separately;
  • Submit the results of the SAA review of complete applications from eligible applicants to DHS/FEMA using the SAA Prioritization Tracker;
  • Submit nonprofit organization application details for applications received but not recommended for funding (including incomplete applications and ineligible applicants), as well as justification as to why they are not being recommended for funding to DHS/FEMA using the SAA Prioritization Tracker (IJs for applications not being recommended for funding should not be submitted to FEMA);
  • Submit IJs that are recommended for funding; and
  • Retain the mission statements and vulnerability assessments submitted by each nonprofit organization.

The SAA will base the ranking on the final scores from the Prioritization Tracker as determined by the SAA’s subject-matter expertise and discretion with consideration of the following factors:

  • Need: The relative need for the nonprofit organization compared to the other applicants; and
  • Impact: The feasibility of the proposed project and how effectively the proposed project addresses the identified need.

Federal Review

The highest-scoring IJs from each submitting high-risk urban area are reviewed by a panel made up of DHS/FEMA Preparedness Officers, FEMA Regional staff, and/or Grants Management Specialists. FEMA typically reviews IJs totaling up to 150% of the available funding. As a part of this, federal staff will also verify that the nonprofit is located within a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area.

In determining the number of applications that will advance to the federal review, FEMA will:

Organize applications in rank order (based on the state scores) from highest to lowest score; then

Select the highest scored projects for a federal review. At least one IJ from each submitting high-risk urban area will be included in the federal review.

Federal reviewers will score each IJ using the NSGP Investment Justification Scoring Worksheet. The questions the reviewers will score are:

  • Background Information Section
    • Did the applicant provide a description of their nonprofit organization to include:
      • Symbolic value of the site as a highly recognized national or historical institution or significant institution within the community that renders the site as a possible target of terrorism
      • Any role in responding to or recovering from terrorist attacks
        • 0 = the applicant did not provide a response to all of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
        • 1 = the applicant provided some of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
        • 2 = the applicant provided all of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
  • Risk Section
    • Did the applicant discuss specific threats or attacks against the nonprofit organization or closely related organization?
      • 0 = the applicant did not address findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 2 = the applicant partially addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
  • In considering the vulnerabilities, how well did the applicant describe the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant did not address the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 2 = the applicant partially addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
  • In considering potential consequences, how well did the applicant address potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed, or disrupted by a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant did not address potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 2 = the applicant partially addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
  • Facility Hardening Section
    • How well does the proposed facility hardening activity mitigate the identified risk(s) and/or vulnerabilities?
      • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risks(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 1 = the applicant provided a poor description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 2 = the applicant provided a partial description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 3 = the applicant provided an adequate description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 4 = the applicant provided a thorough description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
  • Did the applicant’s proposed facility hardening activity focus on the preparation for, prevention of, protection against, and/or responding to the risk of a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant’s facility hardening activity did not focus on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant’s facility hardening activity poorly focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 2= the applicant’s facility hardening activity partially focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 3= the applicant’s facility hardening activity adequately focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 4= the applicant’s facility hardening activity thoroughlyfocused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
  • Did the applicant propose projects that are allowable based on the priorities of the program?
    • 0 = the proposed projects are not allowable based on the priorities of the program
    • 1 = the proposed projects are partially allowable and the un-allowability will compromise the successful implementation of the project
    • 2 = the proposed projects are partially allowable but could be resolved with a minor modification to the proposed project
    • 3 = the proposed projects are all allowable based on the priorities of the program
  • Did the applicant propose projects that are feasible based on the priorities of the program?
    • 0 = the proposed projects are not feasible based on the priorities of the program
    • 1 = the proposed projects could be feasible but require significant changes
    • 2 = the proposed projects could be feasible but require minor changes
    • 3 = the proposed projects are feasible based on the priorities of the program
  • Milestone Section
    • How well did the applicant describe the milestones and the associated key activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance?
      • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 1 = the applicant provided a poor description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 2 = the applicant provided a partial description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 3 = the applicant provided an adequate description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 4 = the applicant provided a thorough description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
  • Project Management Section
    • How well did the applicant justify the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment?
      • 0 = the applicant did not justify the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 1 = the applicant partially justified the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 2 = the applicant adequately justified the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 3 = the applicant thoroughly the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
  • Impact Section
    • How well did the applicant describe the outcomes/outputs that would indicate that the investment was successful?
      • 0 = the applicant did not discuss what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 1 = the applicant poorly discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 2 = the applicant partially discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 3 = the applicant adequately discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 4 = the applicant thoroughly discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
  • Did the applicant describe how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities?
    • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities
    • 1 = the applicant provided a description of how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities

Final Score

To calculate an application’s final score, the sum of the applicant’s SAA score and the average of the federal reviewers’ scores will be multiplied:

By a factor of three for ideology-based/spiritual/religious entities;

  • By a factor of two for medical and educational institutions; and
  • By a factor of one for all other nonprofit organizations.

Applicants that have never received an NSGP award will have 15 points added to their score.

To advance considerations of equity in awarding NSGP grant funding, FEMA will add additional points to the scores of organizations that are located in historically underserved or disadvantaged communities. FEMA will apply the CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index[3] tool to each applicant and will add 10 points to applications from organizations in communities with a “High” SVI ranking (.60 - .79) and 15 points to applications from organizations in communities with a “Very High” SVI ranking (.80 – 1.0).

Applicants will be selected from highest to lowest scored within their respective urban area until the available urban area target allocation has been exhausted. In the event of a tie during the funding determination process, priority will be given to nonprofit organizations that are located in historically underserved or disadvantaged communities, then those that have not received prior year funding, and then those prioritized highest by their SAA. Should additional NSGP-UA funding remain unobligated after reviewing all submissions, FEMA will use the final scores, in part, to determine how the remaining balance of funds will be allocated. Submissions will be selected for funding until the remaining balance of funds is exhausted.

DHS/FEMA will use the final results to make funding recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security. All final funding determinations will be made by the Secretary of Homeland Security, who retains the discretion to consider other factors and information in addition to DHS/FEMA’s funding recommendations.

NSGP-S Process

State Review

Application packages are submitted by the nonprofit organization to the SAA based on the established criteria. The SAA will review applications and recommend to DHS/FEMA which nonprofit organizations should be selected for funding. As part of the state review, the SAAs must:

  • Conduct an eligibility review;
  • Verify that the nonprofit is located outside a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area;
  • Review and score all complete application packages (including vulnerability assessments and mission statement) using the NSGP Scoring Worksheet provided by DHS/FEMA.
  • Validate the self-certified organization type listed in the IJ by assessing the central purpose of the organization described in the mission statement;
  • Prioritize all NSGP IJs by ranking each IJ. Each IJ will receive a unique rank (#1 [one] being the highest ranked through the total number of applications the SAA scored);
  • Submit the results of the state review along with complete applications from eligible applicants to DHS/FEMA using the SAA Prioritization Tracker;
  • Submit nonprofit organization application details for applications received but not recommended for funding (including incomplete applications and ineligible applicants), as well as justification as to why they are not being recommended for funding to DHS/FEMA using the SAA Prioritization Tracker (IJs for applications not being recommended for funding should not be submitted to FEMA);
  • Submit IJs that are recommended for funding; SAAs should submit IJs that collectively represent 150% of the state’s NSGP-S allocation; this will allow DHS/FEMA to award the next prioritized IJ in instances when an applicant is found to be ineligible or when a significant portion of an IJ includes proposed projects that are unallowable, for example:
  • Retain the mission statements and vulnerability assessments submitted by each nonprofit organization.
  • The SAA will base the ranking on the final scores from the Prioritization Tracker as determined by the SAA’s subject-matter expertise and discretion with consideration of the following factors:
  • Need: The relative need for the nonprofit organization compared to the other applicants; and
  • Impact: The feasibility of the proposed project and how effectively the proposed project addresses the identified need.

Federal Review

The IJs submitted by each SAA will be reviewed by DHS/FEMA Preparedness Officers, FEMA Regional staff, and/or Grants Management Specialists. Federal staff will verify that the nonprofit organization is located outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area. Federal reviewers will score each IJ using the NSGP Investment Justification Scoring Worksheet. The questions the reviewers will score are:

  • Background Information Section
    • Did the applicant provide a description of their nonprofit organization to include:
      • Symbolic value of the site as a highly recognized national or historical institution or significant institution within the community that renders the site as a possible target of terrorism
      • Any role in responding to or recovering from terrorist attacks
        • 0 = the applicant did not provide a response to all of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
        • 1 = the applicant provided some of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
        • 2 = the applicant provided all of the required information regarding their nonprofit organization
  • Risk Section
    • Did the applicant discuss specific threats or attacks against the nonprofit organization or closely related organization?
      • 0 = the applicant did not address findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 2 = the applicant partially addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
      • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed the findings from previously conducted risk assessments, police reports, and/or insurance claims
  • In considering the vulnerabilities, how well did the applicant describe the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant did not address the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 2 = the applicant partially addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
    • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed the organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation or exploitation by a terrorist attack
  • In considering potential consequences, how well did the applicant address potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant did not address potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant poorly addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 2 = the applicant partially addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 3 = the applicant adequately addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
    • 4 = the applicant thoroughly addressed potential negative effects on the organization’s asset, system, and/or network if damaged, destroyed or disrupted by a terrorist attack
  • Facility Hardening Section
    • How well does the proposed facility hardening activity mitigate the identified risk(s) and/or vulnerabilities?
      • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risks(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 1 = the applicant provided a poor description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 2 = the applicant provided a partial description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 3 = the applicant provided an adequate description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
      • 4 = the applicant provided a thorough description of how the proposed facility hardening activity will mitigate the identified risk(s)/vulnerabilities
  • Did the applicant’s proposed facility hardening activity focus on the preparation for, prevention of, protection against, and/or responding to the risk of a terrorist attack?
    • 0 = the applicant’s facility hardening activity did not focus on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 1 = the applicant’s facility hardening activity poorly focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 2= the applicant’s facility hardening activity partially focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 3= the applicant’s facility hardening activity adequately focused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
    • 4= the applicant’s facility hardening activity thoroughlyfocused on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk of a terrorist attack
  • Did the applicant propose projects that are allowable based on the priorities of the program?
    • 0 = the proposed projects are not allowable based on the priorities of the program
    • 1 = the proposed projects are partially allowable and the un-allowability will compromise the successful implementation of the project
    • 2 = the proposed projects are partially allowable but could be resolved with a minor modification to the proposed project
    • 3 = the proposed projects are all allowable based on the priorities of the program
  • Did the applicant propose projects that are feasible based on the priorities of the program?
    • 0 = the proposed projects are not feasible based on the priorities of the program
    • 1 = the proposed projects could be feasible but require significant changes
    • 2 = the proposed projects could be feasible but require minor changes
    • 3 = the proposed projects are feasible based on the priorities of the program
  • Milestone Section
    • How well did the applicant describe the milestones and the associated key activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance?
      • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 1 = the applicant provided a poor description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 2 = the applicant provided a partial description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 3 = the applicant provided an adequate description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
      • 4 = the applicant provided a thorough description of milestones and associated activities that lead to the milestone event over the NSGP period of performance
  • Project Management Section
    • How well did the applicant justify the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment?
      • 0 = the applicant did not justify the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 1 = the applicant partially justified the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 2 = the applicant adequately justified the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
      • 3 = the applicant thoroughly the effectiveness of the proposed management team’s roles and responsibilities and governance structure to support the implementation of the investment
  • Impact Section
    • How well did the applicant describe the outcomes/outputs that would indicate that the investment was successful?
      • 0 = the applicant did not discuss what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 1 = the applicant poorly discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 2 = the applicant partially discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 3 = the applicant adequately discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
      • 4 = the applicant thoroughly discussed what outcomes/outputs indicate that the investment was successful
  • Did the applicant describe how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities?
    • 0 = the applicant did not provide a description of how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities
    • 1 = the applicant provided a description of how the investment supports building or sustaining the identified Goal Core Capabilities

Final Score

To calculate an application’s final score, the sum of the applicant’s SAA score and the federal reviewer’s score will be multiplied:

By a factor of three for nonprofit groups that are at a high risk of terrorist attacks due to their ideology, beliefs, or mission;

By a factor of two for medical and educational institutions; and

By a factor of one for all other nonprofit organizations.

Applicants that have never received a NSGP award will have 15 points added to their score.

To advance considerations of equity in awarding NSGP grant funding, FEMA will add additional points to the scores of organizations that are located in historically underserved or disadvantaged communities. FEMA will apply the CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index tool to each applicant and will add 10 points to applications from organizations in communities with a “High” SVI ranking (.60 - .79) and 15 points to applications from organizations in communities with a “Very High” SVI ranking (.80 – 1.0).

Applicants will be selected from highest to lowest scored within their respective state/territory until the available state target allocation has been exhausted. In the event of a tie during the funding determination process, priority will be given to nonprofit organizations located in historically underserved or disadvantaged communities, then those that have not received prior year funding, and then those prioritized highest by their SAA. Should additional NSGP-S funding remain unobligated after reviewing all state submissions, FEMA will use the final scores, in part, to determine how the remaining balance of funds will be allocated. Submissions will be selected for funding until the remaining balance of funds is exhausted.

DHS/FEMA will use the final results to make funding recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security. All final funding determinations will be made by the Secretary of Homeland Security, who retains the discretion to consider other factors and information in addition to DHS/FEMA’s funding recommendations.

F.     Federal Award Administration Information

1.      Notice of Award

Before accepting the award, the AOR and recipient should carefully read the award package. The award package includes instructions on administering the grant award and the terms and conditions associated with responsibilities under federal awards. Recipients must accept all conditions in this funding notice and the Preparedness Grants Manual as well as any specific terms and conditions in the Notice of Award to receive an award under this program.

See the Preparedness Grants Manual for information on Notice of Award.

2.      Pass-Through Requirements

Pass-through funding is required under this program. See the Preparedness Grants Manual for information on these requirements.

3.      Administrative and National Policy Requirements

In addition to the requirements of in this section and in this funding notice, FEMA may place specific terms and conditions on individual awards in accordance with 2 C.F.R. Part 200.

In addition to the information regarding DHS Standard Terms and Conditions and Ensuring the Protection of Civil Rights, see the Preparedness Grants Manual for additional information on administrative and national policy requirements, including the following:

a.      DHS Standard Terms and Conditions

All successful applicants for DHS grant and cooperative agreements are required to comply with DHS Standard Terms and Conditions, which are available online at: DHS Standard Terms and Conditions. The applicable DHS Standard Terms and Conditions will be those in effect at the time the award was made. What terms and conditions will apply for the award will be clearly stated in the award package at the time of award.

b.      Ensuring the Protection of Civil Rights

As the Nation works towards achieving the National Preparedness Goal, it is important to continue to protect the civil rights of individuals. Recipients and subrecipients must carry out their programs and activities, including those related to building, sustaining, and delivering core capabilities, in a manner that respects and ensures the protection of civil rights for protected populations.

Federal civil rights statutes, such as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with DHS and FEMA regulations, prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, limited English proficiency, or economic status in connection with programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance from FEMA.

Recipients must complete the DHS Civil Rights Evaluation Tool within 30 days of receipt of Notice of Award. Information about this requirement and a fuller list of the civil rights provisions that apply to recipients can be found in the DHS Standard Terms and Conditions. Additional information on civil rights provisions is available at https://www.dhs.gov/civil-rights-resources-recipients-dhs-financial-assistance and https://www.fema.gov/about/offices/equal-rights/civil-rights.

Monitoring and oversight requirements in connection with recipient compliance with federal civil rights laws are also authorized pursuant to 44 C.F.R. Part 7.

In accordance with civil rights laws and regulations, recipients and subrecipients must ensure the consistent and systematic fair, just and impartial treatment of all individuals, including individuals who belong to underserved communities that have been denied such treatment.

c.       Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) Compliance

As a federal agency, FEMA is required to consider the effects of its actions on the environment and historic properties to ensure that all activities and programs funded by FEMA, including grant-funded projects, comply with federal EHP laws, Executive Orders, regulations and policies, as applicable.

FEMA grant funding for new construction or substantial improvement must comply with Executive Order (EO) 14030, Climate-Related Financial Risk and applicable FEMA implementing policies in place at the time of disbursement, including FEMA Policy #-206-21-0003, Partial Implementation of the Federal Flood Risk Management Standard for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Programs (Interim) (fema.gov) or superseding policies. 

Recipients and subrecipients proposing projects that have the potential to impact the environment, including, but not limited to, the construction of communication towers, modification or renovation of existing buildings, structures and facilities, or new construction including replacement of facilities, must participate in the FEMA EHP review process. The EHP review process involves the submission of a detailed project description along with any supporting documentation requested by FEMA in order to determine whether the proposed project has the potential to impact environmental resources or historic properties.

In some cases, FEMA is also required to consult with other regulatory agencies and the public in order to complete the review process. Federal law requires EHP review to be completed before federal funds are released to carry out proposed projects. FEMA may not be able to fund projects that are not incompliance with applicable EHP laws, Executive Orders, regulations and policies.

DHS and FEMA EHP policy is found in directives and instructions available on the FEMA.gov EHP page, the FEMA website page that includes documents regarding EHP responsibilities and program requirements, including implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act and other EHP regulations and Executive Orders.

The GPD EHP screening form is located at https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/90195. Additionally, all recipients under this funding opportunity are required to comply with the FEMA GPD EHP Policy Guidance, FEMA Policy #108-023-1, available at https://www.fema.gov/media- library/assets/documents/85376.

4.      Reporting

Recipients are required to submit various financial and programmatic reports as a condition of award acceptance. Future awards and funds drawdown may be withheld if these reports are delinquent. See the Preparedness Grants Manual for information on reporting requirements.

5.      Monitoring and Oversight

Per 2 C.F.R. § 200.337, FEMA, through its authorized representatives, has the right, at all reasonable times, to make site visits or conduct desk reviews to review project accomplishments and management control systems to review award progress and to provide any required technical assistance. During site visits or desk reviews, FEMA will review recipients’ files related to the award. As part of any monitoring and program evaluation activities, recipients must permit FEMA, upon reasonable notice, to review grant-related records and to interview the organization’s staff and contractors regarding the program.

Recipients must respond in a timely and accurate manner to FEMA requests for information relating to the award.

See the Preparedness Grants Manual for information on monitoring and oversight.

G.    DHS Awarding Agency Contact Information

1.      Contact and Resource Information

a.      Program Office Contact

FEMA has assigned state-specific Preparedness Officers for the NSGP. If you do not know your Preparedness Officer, please contact CSID by phone at (800) 368-6498 or by email at askcsid@fema.dhs.gov, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ET.

b.      Centralized Scheduling and Information Desk (CSID)

CSID is a non-emergency comprehensive management and information resource developed by FEMA for grants stakeholders. CSID provides general information on all FEMA grant programs and maintains a comprehensive database containing key personnel contact information at the federal, state, and local levels. When necessary, recipients will be directed to a federal point of contact who can answer specific programmatic questions or concerns.

CSID can be reached by phone at (800) 368-6498 or by e-mail at askcsid@fema.dhs.gov, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. ET.

c.       Grant Programs Directorate (GPD) Award Administration Division

GPD’s Award Administration Division (AAD) provides support regarding financial matters and budgetary technical assistance. Additional guidance and information can be obtained by contacting the AAD’s Help Desk via e-mail at ASK-GMD@fema.dhs.gov.

d.      FEMA Regional Offices

FEMA Regional Offices also may provide fiscal support, including pre- and post-award administration and technical assistance such as conducting cash analysis, financial monitoring, and audit resolution to the grant program under this funding notice. GPD will provide programmatic support and technical assistance.

FEMA Regional Office contact information is available at https://www.fema.gov/fema-regional-contacts.

e.       Equal Rights

The FEMA Office of Equal Rights (OER) in coordination with the DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties is responsible for compliance with and enforcement of federal civil rights obligations in connection with programs and services conducted by FEMA and recipients of FEMA financial assistance. All inquiries and communications about federal civil rights compliance for FEMA grants under this funding notice should be sent to FEMA-CivilRightsOffice@fema.dhs.gov.

f.        Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation

GPD’s EHP Team provides guidance and information about the EHP review process to recipients and subrecipients. All inquiries and communications about GPD projects under this funding notice or the EHP review process, including the submittal of EHP review materials, should be sent to gpdehpinfo@fema.dhs.gov.

2.      Systems Information

a.      Grants.gov

For technical assistance with Grants.gov, call the customer support hotline 24 hours per day, 7 days per week (except federal holidays) at (800) 518-4726 or e-mail at support@grants.gov.

b.      Non-Disaster (ND) Grants

For technical assistance with the ND Grants system, please contact the ND Grants Helpdesk at ndgrants@fema.dhsgov or (800) 865-4076, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.– 6 p.m.  ET. User resources are available at https://www.fema.gov/grants/guidance-tools/non- disaster-grants-management-system

c.       Payment and Reporting System (PARS)

FEMA uses the Payment and Reporting System (PARS) for financial reporting, invoicing, and tracking payments. FEMA uses the Direct Deposit/Electronic Funds Transfer (DD/EFT) method of payment to recipients. To enroll in the DD/EFT, recipients must complete a Standard Form 1199A, Direct Deposit Form. If you have questions about the online system, please call the Customer Service Center at (866) 927-5646 or email ask- GMD@fema.dhs.gov.

H.    Additional Information

GPD has developed the Preparedness Grants Manual to guide applicants and recipients of grant funding on how to manage their grants and other resources. Recipients seeking guidance on policies and procedures for managing preparedness grants should reference the Preparedness Grants Manual for further information. Examples of information contained in the Preparedness Grants Manual include:

Actions to Address Noncompliance

  • Audits
  • Case Studies and Use of Grant-Funded Resources During Real-World Incident Operations
  • Community Lifelines
  • Conflicts of Interest in the Administration of Federal Awards and Subawards
  • Disability Integration
  • National Incident Management System
  • Payment Information
  • Period of Performance Extensions
  • Procurement Integrity
  • Record Retention
  • Whole Community Preparedness
  • Other Post-Award Requirements

1.      Termination Provisions

FEMA may terminate a federal award in whole or in part for one of the following reasons. FEMA and the recipient must still comply with closeout requirements at 2 C.F.R. §§ 200.344-200.345 even if an award is terminated in whole or in part. To the extent that subawards are permitted under this funding notice, pass-through entities should refer to 2 C.F.R. §200.340 for additional information on termination regarding subawards.

a.      Noncompliance

If a recipient fails to comply with the terms and conditions of a federal award, FEMA may terminate the award in whole or in part. If the noncompliance can be corrected, FEMA may first attempt to direct the recipient to correct the noncompliance. This may take the form of a Compliance Notification. If the noncompliance cannot be corrected or the recipient is non- responsive, FEMA may proceed with a Remedy Notification, which could impose a remedy for noncompliance per 2 C.F.R. § 200.339, including termination. Any action to terminate based on noncompliance will follow the requirements of 2 C.F.R. §§ 200.341-200.342 as well as the requirement of 2 C.F.R. § 200.340(c) to report in FAPIIS the recipient’s material failure to comply with the award terms and conditions. See also the section on Actions to Address Noncompliance in this funding notice or in the Preparedness Grants Manual.

b.      With the Consent of the Recipient

FEMA may also terminate an award in whole or in part with the consent of the recipient, in which case the parties must agree upon the termination conditions, including the effective date, and in the case of partial termination, the portion to be terminated.

c.       Notification by the Recipient

The recipient may terminate the award, in whole or in part, by sending written notification to FEMA setting forth the reasons for such termination, the effective date, and in the case of partial termination, the portion to be terminated. In the case of partial termination, FEMA may determine that a partially terminated award will not accomplish the purpose of the federal award, so FEMA may terminate the award in its entirety. If that occurs, FEMA will follow the requirements of 2 C.F.R. §§ 200.341-200.342 in deciding to fully terminate the award.

2.    Program Evaluation

Recipients and subrecipients are encouraged to incorporate program evaluation activities from the outset of their program design and implementation to meaningfully document and measure their progress towards meeting an agency priority goal(s). Title I of the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 (Evidence Act), Pub. L. No. 115-435 (2019) urges federal awarding agencies and federal assistance recipients and subrecipients to use program evaluation as a critical tool to learn, to improve equitable delivery, and to elevate program service and delivery across the program lifecycle. Evaluation means “an assessment using systematic data collection and analysis of one or more programs, policies, and organizations intended to assess their effectiveness and efficiency.” Evidence Act § 101 (codified at 5 U.S.C. § 311). Evaluation costs are allowable costs (either as direct or indirect), unless prohibited by statute or regulation.

3.      Period of Performance Extensions

Extensions to the period of performance (POP) for this program are allowed. Extensions to the POP identified in the award will only be considered through formal, written requests to the recipient’s FEMA Preparedness Officer and must contain specific and compelling justifications as to why an extension is required. Recipients are advised to coordinate with the FEMA Preparedness Officer as needed when preparing an extension request. Please refer to the Preparedness Grants Manual for more detail on the requirements for submitting a POP extension request.

4.      Protecting Houses of Worship and Public Venues

Across the United States, Americans congregate in faith-based venues to worship, learn, play, and bond as a community. However, public gatherings are vulnerable, and adversaries may perceive houses of worship as attractive targets where they can inflict mass casualties, cause substantial psychological impacts, and draw extensive media coverage. The DHS Center for Faith-Based & Neighborhood Partnerships (DHS Center) partners with interagency and whole community partners to offer numerous resources to assist faith-based and community organizations with their efforts to prepare for all types of hazards, whether natural or man-made. Technical assistance is provided through presentations, workshops, training, webinars, tabletop exercises, and training. Access to these free resources can be found at www.fema.gov/faith-resources.

5.      Appendices

Appendix A: NSGP Subapplicant Quick Start Guide

Appendix B: NSGP Subapplicant Resources

Appendix A

NSGP Subapplicant Quick Start Guide

Nonprofit organizations should use the information in this appendix as a reference when preparing to submit applications under the NSGP. 

What is the NSGP?

The NSGP is a competitive grant program appropriated annually through DHS and administered by FEMA. It is intended to help nonprofit organizations increase their physical security posture against acts of terrorism as defined by law. Eligible organizations are registered 501(c)(3) nonprofits or otherwise are organizations as described under 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and tax-exempt under section 501(a) of the IRC. More information on tax-exempt organizations can be found at: https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/charitable-organizations.

How to Apply

To apply for NSGP funds, interested nonprofit organizations must apply through their SAA. Each SAA has an established application submission process with a state-specific deadline to submit all required materials. The application submission deadline in the funding notice applies to the SAA and is the deadline for SAAs to submit all administratively reviewed application materials to FEMA. You will need to contact your SAA point of contact on state-specific deadlines and supplemental application materials or requirements unique to your state. The list of SAAs can be found at: https://www.fema.gov/grants/preparedness/state-administrative-agency-contacts.

Nonprofit organizations must fully answer each question in all the sections of the Investment Justification(s). In their Investment Justification, nonprofit organizations should summarize the most critically important, impactful, and salient information. You may submit up to three (3) Investment Justifications, which function as an application document, per organization for up to three (3) unique physical locations/addresses. You must submit one (1) unique Investment Justification form and required documents as part of a complete submission package for each physical location/unique address. Each Investment Justification can request up to $150,000 per location for a total of $450,000 across three Investment Justifications for three unique physical locations/addresses. The amount of funding requested, and number of submissions, may not exceed these limits.

Nonprofit organizations applying after April 4, 2022, must have a Unique Entity Identifier (UEI), which is obtained through SAM.gov. Nonprofit organizations must only register in SAM.gov to obtain the UEI but are not required to go through the full SAM.gov registration process and are not required to obtain or maintain an active registration in SAM.gov. Guidance on obtaining a UEI in SAM.gov can be found at GSA UEI Update and SAM.gov Update.

Tip: For FY 2022, NSGP has three funding streams: NSGP-State (NSGP-S), NSGP-Urban Area (NSGP-UA), and Community Project Funding (CPF). Identify and apply for the proper funding stream (NSGP-S, NSGP-UA, or CPF) based on the physical geographical location/address of the facility or specific project. A full list of eligible high-risk urban areas is included in this funding notice. Contact your SAA for questions about the appropriate funding stream based on our organization’s location. Applications submitted to the incorrect funding stream will not be considered.

NSGP-S and NSGP-UA Application Elements

The following materials, including any additional required or requested materials specific to the state, must be submitted to the SAA as part of a complete application package. A submission that is missing any required document(s) will be considered incomplete and will not be reviewed.

Mission Statement

A mission statement is a formal summary of the aims and values of an organization. The three components of a mission statement include the purpose, values, and goals of the organization. The provided statement should discuss the “who, what, and why” of your organization.

Tip: It is highly recommended that the Mission Statement is documented on official letterhead. This element helps inform and validate a nonprofit organization’s categorical self-identification based on its ideology, beliefs, mission, function, or constituency served/supported.

Vulnerability Assessment

A vulnerability assessment is used to identify and validate physical security deficiencies of your organization/facility and is the foundation of an NSGP application. Vulnerability assessments can be provided in the form of a Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) Self-Assessment (Facility Security Self-Assessment | CISA), State or Local Law Enforcement Assessment, Contractor Assessment, or other valid method of assessment. The SAA may require a specific format/type of vulnerability assessment, so be sure to review the state-specific guidelines for their application requirements. The vulnerably assessment is uniquely different than a risk/threat assessment: in essence, a risk assessment involves looking outside of an organization to determine external threats that exist that could potentially lead to security issues, whereas a vulnerability assessment involves looking inside the organization for internal vulnerabilities and weaknesses. Projects/activities requested through the NSGP should align to mitigate items identified in the vulnerability assessment.

Tip: In preparation to describe how they intend to use NSGP grant funding, nonprofit organizations should think broadly and holistically in their approach to security measures designed to protect buildings and safeguard people. Some physical security control examples include locks, gates, and guards (e.g., contract security). While these may be effective measures, there are many additional layers to physical security that can help, including creating comprehensive physical security plans, conducting training and exercises (e.g., active shooter and evacuation), identifying countermeasures against intrusion (e.g., access controls), preventing physical security breaches (e.g., security enhanced doors/windows), and reducing physical security threats (e.g., cameras/surveillance). Descriptions of allowable costs and activities can be located in this funding notice and the PGM. Unallowable costs will not be reimbursed.

Investment Justification

The Investment Justification is a fillable template provided and required by FEMA (which will be made available through Grants.gov) that asks nonprofits to describe the organization, the organization’s risks/threats, and proposed projects/activities to mitigate security deficiencies (as identified in the vulnerability assessment) utilizing NSGP funding.

Supplemental Documents

Each state is unique in how they manage and administer the NSGP. The SAA may require specific supplemental documents or templates in addition to those required by FEMA as part of the state’s internal NSGP application submission requirement. However, when preparing the Investment Justification, organizations must answer questions completely and cannot rely on references to or cite page numbers of any supplemental documents as they are not submitted to nor reviewed by FEMA. Only the Investment Justification is submitted to FEMA by the SAA.

Tip: Contact your SAA for unique, state-specific submission requirements.

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Scoring and Funding Recommendations

Upon submission of your completed application to the SAA, the state will review, score, and rank every complete application it has received from eligible nonprofit organizations. The results of the scoring process will be forwarded to FEMA and will inform the federal review of the Investment Justifications based on the criteria outlined in this funding notice. Following the federal review and based on a combination of state and federal scoring, nonprofit organizations are recommended for funding. The final list of recommended nonprofit organizations to be funded is provided to the Secretary of Homeland Security for final approval.

Investment Justification Checklist

Nonprofit organizations must fully answer each question in all the sections of the Investment Justification(s) for the form to be considered complete. In their Investment Justification, nonprofit organizations should summarize the most critically important, impactful, and salient information. The Investment Justification is the only document submitted to FEMA by the SAA and should be crafted using the identified threats/risks to your organization, the results of the vulnerability assessment of a physical location/structure/building, and details of the requested projects/activities to mitigate or remediate those vulnerabilities with associated estimated costs. Nonprofit organizations should describe their current threat/risk. While historic risk may be included for context, the Investment Justification should focus on current threats and risks.

Reminder: Applicants may submit up to three (3) Investment Justifications with one (1) unique Investment Justification form and required documents for each unique physical location/address. Each Investment Justification can request up to $150,000 per location for a total of $450,000 across three unique physical locations/addresses. The amount of funding requested, and number of submissions, may not exceed these limits.

Below is the Investment Justification Checklist that includes the required contents of a complete NSGP Investment Justification:

Section I – Applicant Information

Legal Name of the Organization/Physical Address of the Facility/County

Year the Original Facility was Constructed

Owning vs. Leasing/Renting and Permission to Make Enhancements

Year the Organization Began Operating from the Facility

Other Organizations in Facility

Mission Statement Summary

Membership/Population Served

Organization Type

Organization’s Affiliation

501(c)(3) Tax-Exempt Designation

UEI obtained via the System for Award Management

Funding Stream

Designated high-risk urban area (if applicable)

Federal Funding Request (total estimated cost of projects/activities)

Investment Phase (new or continuation)

Section II – Background

Describe the symbolic value of your organization’s site as a highly recognized national or historical institution, or significant institution within the community that renders the site a possible target of terrorism.

Describe any role in responding to or recovering from terrorist attacks, specifically highlighting the efforts that demonstrate integration of nonprofit preparedness with broader state and local preparedness efforts.

Section III – Risk

Threat: Describe the identification and substantiation of specific threats, incidents, or attacks against the nonprofit organization or a closely related organization, network, or cell (examples include police report, insurance claim, internet threats, etc.).

Vulnerability: Describe your organization’s susceptibility to destruction, incapacitation, or exploitation by a terrorist attack.

Consequence: Describe potential negative effects/impacts on your organization’s assets, systems, and/or function if disrupted, damaged, or destroyed due to a terrorist attack.

Section IV – Facility Hardening

Describe how the proposed projects/activities will harden (make safer/more secure) the facility and/or mitigate the identified risk(s) and/or vulnerabilities based on the vulnerable assessment

Describe how the proposed target hardening focuses on the prevention of and/or protection against the risk/threat of a terrorist attack.

Confirm that the proposed projects are allowable in accordance with the priorities of the NSGP (Funding Notice, PGM).

Confirm that the proposed projects are feasible (meaning there is a reasonable expectation based on predicable planning assumptions to complete all tasks, projects and/or activities within the subaward period of performance) and proposed milestones under the NSGP.

Section V – Milestones

Describe any key activities that will lead to milestones in the program/project and grants management over the course of the NSGP grant award period of performance.

Section VI – Project Management

Describe the proposed management team’s roles, responsibilities, and governance structure to support the implementation of the projects/activities.

Assess the project management plan/approach.

Section VII – Impact

Describe the outcome and outputs of the proposed projects/activities that will indicate that the investment was successful.

Funding History

Include past funding amounts and projects under NSGP.

Definitions

Vulnerability Assessment: The vulnerability assessment is a documented review of your facility that identifies gaps in security. Addressing gaps as they are identified in the vulnerability assessment keeps a facility and its users safer. This document is the foundation of an NSGP application.

Subapplicant/Subrecipient: Individual nonprofit organizations are considered the subapplicants or the subrecipients of the NSGP grant; the SAA is the primary applicant and recipient. Each nonprofit organization must individually submit an application to their SAA, which will then submit it to FEMA for consideration, but the award itself will be made directly to the state or territory’s SAA. The SAA will then manage the grant and be the main point of contact for the nonprofit organizations for everything related to their grant award.

Period of Performance: The period of performance is the length of time that recipients and subrecipients have to implement their project(s), accomplish all goals, and expend all grant funding. The period of performance under the NSGP is 36 months for SAAs. However, given the SAA has a high level of administrative burden in managing the NSGP, typically a shorter period of performance than 36 months is given to nonprofit subrecipients. There may be situational extensions to the period of performance based on undue hardships, but recipients and subrecipients should not assume any extensions will be granted and plan for full project completion within the designated period of performance. All costs must be incurred, and all services or goods must be completed or delivered within the period of performance. Unless the subrecipient and SAA have requested and received approval from FEMA for pre-award costs, any expenditures made prior to official notification of award from the SAA and before the start of the subrecipient’s period of performance will be considered unallowable.

High-Risk Urban Area: High-risk urban areas are metropolitan locations designated in FEMA’s Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) program each year based on the 100 most populous metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Nonprofit organizations with physical locations in one of those high-risk urban areas are eligible under the NSGP-UA program; all other nonprofits are eligible under the NSGP-State program. The list of high-risk urban areas under UASI changes every year based on risk. A list of eligible high-risk urban areas will be included in each year’s NSGP funding notice. Because high-risk urban areas often extend beyond the local city limits and because the localities included within the corresponding MSA are not always included in the high-risk urban area, contact your SAA to confirm whether your organization is located within a designated high-risk urban area for the purposes of the NSGP-UA program. If a nonprofit does not apply for the correct funding stream based on location, the application will be automatically determined ineligible.

State Administrative Agency (SAA): SAAs are the designated state and territory offices that manage the NSGP awards. These offices are the primary applicants to and recipients of NSGP funds. The SAA will make NSGP subawards to subrecipients (e.g., nonprofit organizations).

: Potential for an adverse outcome assessed as a function of hazard/threats, assets and their vulnerabilities, and consequence. In other words, nonprofit organizations should describe their current threat/risk of terroristic attack and how those identified vulnerabilities (in the vulnerability assessment) could potentially be exploited.

: Indication of potential harm to life, information, operations, the environment and/or property; may be a natural or human-created occurrence and includes capabilities, intentions, and attack methods of adversaries used to exploit circumstances or occurrences with the intent to cause harm.

: Physical feature or operational attribute that renders an entity open to exploitation or susceptible to a given hazard; includes characteristic of design, location, security posture, operation, or any combination thereof, that renders an asset, system, network, or entity susceptible to disruption, destruction, or exploitation.

: Effect of an event, incident, or occurrence; commonly measured in four ways: human, economic, mission, and psychological, but may also include other factors such as impact on the environment.

Terrorism: Any activity that:

Involves an act that: A) is dangerous to human life or potentially destructive of critical infrastructure or key resources; and B) is a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State or other subdivision of the United States; and

Appears to be intended to: A) intimidate or coerce a civilian population; B) influence a policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or C) affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping.

Equity: the consistent and systematic fair, just, and impartial treatment of all individuals, including individuals who belong to underserved communities that have been denied such treatment, such as Black, Latino, and Indigenous and Native American persons, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and other persons of color; members of religious minorities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) persons; persons with disabilities; persons who live in rural areas; and persons otherwise adversely affected by persistent poverty or inequality. 

Underserved Community:

Per the FEMA National Disaster Recovery Framework: groups that have limited or no access to resources or that are otherwise disenfranchised. These groups may include people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged; people with limited English proficiency; geographically isolated or educationally disenfranchised people; people of color as well as those of ethnic and national origin minorities; women and children; individuals with disabilities and others with access and functional needs; and seniors.

Per Executive Order 13985: populations sharing a particular characteristic, as well as geographic communities, that have been systematically denied a full opportunity to participate in aspects of economic, social, and civic life, as exemplified by the list in the preceding definition of “equity.”   

Additional definitions can be found in the DHS Lexicon Terms and Definitions.

Appendix B NSGP Subapplicant Resources

 

This appendix contains a list of resources that NSGP subapplicants may find useful in the development of their Investment Justifications. Potential subapplicants can use the links listed below to access information and resources that can assist in the NSGP application process and project implementation.

 

DHS/FEMA, Grant Programs Directorate

 

DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)

 

DHS Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

DHS Office for Civil Rights & Civil Liberties

DHS/FEMA Office of Law Enforcement and Engagement Integration

DHS Center for Prevention, Programs and Partnerships (CP3)

Department of Justice (DOJ) Community Relations Service

DOJ Civil Rights Division

U.S. Department of Education

Office of Intelligence & Analysis

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Other Resources

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Last updated May 17, 2022