We Are FEMA

FEMA’s employees are committed to serving our country before, during and after disasters. Every day more than 20,000 emergency managers work to make our nation safer, stronger and more prepared.
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The core values that guide our agency can be found in our capstone doctrine, “We Are FEMA.” Every day, across the nation, FEMA employees are inspired by that mission and are working tirelessly to make a difference.

We encourage you to learn more about the staff and their mission-driven work and the who, what and why behind our mission.

Video Spotlight

Watch more stories in our We Are FEMA playlist on YouTube.

#IAMFEMA Stories

The men and women of FEMA are our most valuable assets. This diverse team represents every U.S. state, local, tribal and territorial area and our effectiveness is enhanced because we understand the communities we serve. We strive to ensure that our values of compassion, fairness, integrity and respect are reflected through our actions in every step in the process.

Explore these stories to get to know the people of FEMA and the many ways they are helping to create a more prepared and resilient nation. To join our team, go to USAJOBS.gov to see the latest job openings.

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“FEMA allows me the opportunity to continue working to help others in need."

– Arlena, Region 2

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"My FEMA training and my ability to remain calm in uncertain situations undoubtedly played a significant role in me saving an elderly woman's life."

– Tom, Region 9

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“As I support the Deaf employee, I
get to see the amazing work that unfolds, the collaboration that
happens and the survivors who are able to benefit. Our Deaf
employees are dedicated to providing assistance to these
survivors, and I am so fortunate to be part of it,”

– Yasmine, Reservists

Senior Advisor for the Office of Response and Recovery Mike Plostock shares his experience responding after the Surfside Collapse.

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Jamie Casterton is a Public Affairs Specialist at FEMA Region 8. She joined the agency in November 2018 and have been with our regional office in Denver, Colorado since May 2020.

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Paul is a Regional Geographic Information System (GIS) Specialist at FEMA Region 8. He started with FEMA as a local hire in early 2005 to support disaster recovery after four strong hurricanes hit Florida in just a matter of weeks.

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To celebrate Earth Day, FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell, AmeriCorps Chief Executive Officer Michael Smith and AmeriCorps teams partnered with Washington Parks & People for a service event at the Marvin Gaye Community Center in Washington, D.C. During the event, participants planted a tree, removed invasive species from the park and cleared out debris from surrounding waterways. The community center is the largest municipal park in the district and is home to over 200 forest plants.

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When disasters threaten our homes, offices and communities, the importance of building codes is more evident than ever. If a structure follows modern codes, it is more likely to withstand strong floods, wind and other risks due to natural hazards. These codes help to protect property and save lives.

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Many people spend time in churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, gurdwaras or other places of worship and public spaces. People should feel safe when they gather to express their faith or serve their community. As we continue to learn from faith and community leaders how to improve the safety and security of these spaces, we identified five ways your community can get started today.

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On Aug. 29, President Biden directed DHS to lead and coordinate efforts across the federal government to support vulnerable Afghans — including many who had worked alongside us in Afghanistan for the past 20 years — as they safely resettle in the U.S. This mission is known as Operation Allies Welcome.

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On April 1, FEMA turned 43. Over the past four decades, the agency has seen many changes. One thing that has not changed is the strength, passion and determination of the FEMA workforce. Together, we have worked to improve the way things are done, reach people where they are and build more resilient communities.

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Thaddaeus Vasquez was pursuing a career in IT when he quickly realized that he did not enjoy sitting at a desk all day. After a conversation with a professor, he instead was inspired to take an emergency management training program with Job Corps.

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Photographs are a powerful storytelling tool that can stir emotions and put a human face on the effects of disasters. By showing the scope of a disaster and the work done to help survivors, FEMA photographers are in the unique position of telling FEMA’s story when words fail the imagination.

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Last updated December 22, 2021