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Levee Tools, Templates and Success Stories for Community Outreach

Browse fact sheets, infographics and success stories to support your community outreach efforts to educate communities about levees, the associated risk and actions they can take to reduce that risk.

Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees: Overtopping Procedure

Modeling Mapping Non-Accredited Levees: Structural-Based Inundation Procedure

Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees: Sound Reach Procedure

Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees: Freeboard Deficient Procedure

Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees: Natural Valley Procedure

NFIP and Levees: An Overview

Meeting the Criteria for Accrediting Levee Systems on Flood Insurance Rate Maps

Levee Tools, Templates and Success Stories for Community Outreach

This document container hosts a series of levee documents including fact sheets, infographics and Success Stories. The purpose of these documents is to support community outreach and educate communities about levees, the associated risk and actions they can take to reduce that risk.

Structural-Based Inundation Procedure: Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees

Natural Valley Procedure: Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees

Sound Reach Procedure: Modeling Mapping Non-Accredited Levees

Freeboard Deficient Procedure: Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees

Overtopping Procedure: Modeling and Mapping Non-Accredited Levees

Region IX Success Story: Coachella

Zone D and Levees

Levees Risk and Mitigation Community Officials

Levees Risk and Mitigation: Property Owners

At-a-Glance Process Infographic

Commonly used Terms and Acronyms for Levee Systems

Region IV Success Story: Georgia

In 2014, the Georgia Safe Dams Program (SDP) drafted a strategic plan to examine their current rules and regulations for
dams. As a result, SDP identifed the need to clarify a rule that would require high-hazard dams within the State to have
an Emergency Action Plan (EAP). As a result of the strategic plan, a rules modifcation was proposed and adopted in
late 2016. According to the new rules contained in the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Rules for Dam Safety
Chapter 391-3-8-.11, all owners of Category I dams that were classifed on or after October 1, 2016, must submit an EAP
to the SDP as part of an Application for Construction and Operation Permit. Additionally, the rule said if a dam was classifed
as a Category 1 before October 1, 2016 (which includes most of the SDP dams), owners had until July 1, 2017, to submit an
EAP. Based on enactment of the new rules and the concerted outreach effort to dam owners, as of August 1, 2018, 251 out of
473 Category 1 (high-hazard) dams in the State have completed EAPs and 73 EAPs are under review. That is, over 70 percent
of the high-hazard dams in the State have completed EAPs, and submittals continue to come in.

Last updated May 12, 2021