Main Content

Assistance To Firefighters Grants Success Stories - Georgetown, CA

This page highlights how an AFG grant funded a new wildland interface engine. This page is intended for fire departments and nonaffiliated Emergency Medical Service organizations.

New Wildland Engine Is First New Vehicle In 20 Years

Georgetown Fire Protection District

GEORGETOWN, CA -- One of the Georgetown District's biggest problems is wildland fires.

"Of the fire calls received in 2003, about 80 percent were for wildland or forest fires," said Chief Rick Todd.

"This is the first brand new engine we have purchased in more than 20 years, and it is built just for the way we operate," said Todd, referring to the new wildland interface engine purchased by the Georgetown Fire Protection District with their 2003 Assistance to Firefighters grant.

Georgetown Fire Protection District bought a new wildland interface type II engine, pictured here with Blaze, the Dalmation fire dog.In the short five months the Wildland engine has been in service, it has been put into action several times through the state's mutual aid system, including deployments to aid firefighting efforts in nearby Eldorado National Forest.

The District is in a rural area of northern California, northeast of Sacramento, and their fire vehicles have to be able to travel efficiently over rough terrain, narrow and winding mountain roads, and unpaved gravel driveways. The new engine enhances the District's wildland fire suppression capabilities. Its protection area covers about 100 square miles and approximately 6,500 residents.

The District's 35 volunteer firefighters and 11 paid staff members "were ecstatic to have a new vehicle to work with," said Chief Todd.

Although the District has eight fire vehicles to equip its five fire stations, the new grant-funded engine is the only one to meet all of the relevant National Fire Protection Association requirements. After the grant-funded engine, the District's newest vehicle is 16 years old.

More than 100 years apart, the new Georgetown Engine-61 stands beside the restored Reno Engine-1.In the short five months the wildland engine has been in service, it has been put into action several times through the state's mutual aid system, including deployments to aid firefighting efforts in nearby Eldorado National Forest.The new engine carries up to 500 gallons of water, pumps 1,000 gallons per minute, and carries advanced life support and extrication equipment.

Chief Todd observes that the District firefighters and the Georgetown community alike view the new Wildland engine as a source of pride. When the Fire District recently celebrated its 150th anniversary on September 11, they showcased the new engine with the District's very first fire engine, a restored 1902 horse-drawn fire engine.

What They Bought With The 2003 Grant:

  • Wildland interface type II engine
Last Updated: 
04/25/2019 - 15:02