Fact Sheets

FEMA works closely with the U.S. Small Business Administration, which provides low-interest disaster loans for homeowners, renters, businesses and nonprofit organizations. SBA disaster loans may cover losses that are not fully covered by insurance or other sources. The SBA is the largest source of federal disaster recovery funds for survivors. Failure to return the SBA loan application may disqualify you from other possible financial assistance from FEMA or other financial resources.

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As you prepare for the holiday season and all it brings, be sure to take time for you. Give yourself a break from the tension. Pause to notice the beauty around you.

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While FEMA’s application deadline has passed, there is still help available for survivors of Vermont’s July severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides. It’s important to stay in touch with FEMA.

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If you were affected by Hurricane Idalia and applied for FEMA disaster assistance, FEMA may be trying to reach you but may not have your current contact information. Having this information is important in case FEMA needs more information from you or needs to arrange a home inspection to verify damage.

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Have you checked in with your friends, family and neighbors who were impacted by Hurricane Idalia? In Berrien, Brooks, Cook, Glynn and Lowndes counties, it’s the perfect time to check on elderly neighbors and others who may need support to apply for FEMA assistance.

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FEMA Individual Assistance grants and Small Business Administration disaster loans are only parts of the recovery solution for survivors of the March tornadoes in Mississippi. State, nonprofit and federal programs also can help.

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Interpreters for most languages spoken by Georgia survivors of Hurricane Idalia are available to help. Survivors who want to apply for FEMA disaster assistance can do so in-person at State of Georgia/FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) or by calling the FEMA Helpline.

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Some residents of Lamoille, Washington and Windsor counties whose homes were destroyed by July’s storms may be eligible for FEMA Direct Temporary Housing Assistance. This may come in the form of Manufactured Housing Units (MHUs), which are one- to three-bedroom mobile homes.

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FEMA grants and disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration are only part of the recovery solution. For homeowners and renters in Jackson and Jasper counties affected by the tornadoes in June, state, nonprofit and federal programs also could help.

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