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FEMA Media Library

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Flood Insurance Study (FIS) Data Request Form

This informational flyer provides a detailed listing of categories and fees for requesting Flood Insurance Study (FIS)-related technical and administrative support data from the FEMA library located in Alexandria, VA.

Note: The address and e-mail address associated with the documents below has been updated. Please send all materials and/or payments to the following address:

3601 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22304-6426
Libraryrequest@riskmapcds.com

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Payment Information Form - National Flood Insurance Program

Payment form for requesting Flood Insurance Study (FIS)-related technical and administrative support data from the FEMA library located in Alexandria, VA.

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Earthquake Strengthening of Cripple Walls in Wood-Frame Dwellings (FEMA P-1024-RA2)

On August 24, 2014, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake occurred in Napa, California. In response to this earthquake, the Special Projects task of the National Earthquake Technical Assistance Program (NETAP) was used to fund an investigation. At the time, this event had not yet been declared a federal disaster, and disaster funds were therefore not available. Because of limitations to this funding, some issues, such as performance of lifelines or building investigations in additional areas, could not be investigated. Past earthquakes in California have resulted in significant improvements to national and local building codes. For the 2014 South Napa earthquake, work was focused on documenting the observed performance of buildings and nonstructural components in order to lead into future improvements in future building codes, and to do so within six months.

Recovery Advisory 2 (RA2) is Appendix B of the FEMA P-1024 report. RA2 addresses measures to mitigate cripple wall vulnerabilities before an earthquake occurs and provides information on how and when to use the accompanying FEMA Plan Set.

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Repair of Earthquake-Damaged Masonry Fireplace Chimneys (FEMA P-1024-RA1)

On August 24, 2014, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake occurred in Napa, California. In response to this earthquake, the Special Projects task of the National Earthquake Technical Assistance Program (NETAP) was used to fund an investigation. At the time, this event had not yet been declared a federal disaster, and disaster funds were therefore not available. Because of limitations to this funding, some issues, such as performance of lifelines or building investigations in additional areas, could not be investigated. Past earthquakes in California have resulted in significant improvements to national and local building codes. For the 2014 South Napa earthquake, work was focused on documenting the observed performance of buildings and nonstructural components in order to lead into future improvements in future building codes, and to do so within six months.

Recovery Advisory 1 (RA1) is Appendix A of the FEMA P-1024 report. RA1 recommends best practices for reconstruction of earthquake‐damaged masonry chimneys in one‐and two‐family dwellings to minimize risk of damage in future earthquakes.

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Performance of Buildings and Nonstructural Components in the 2014 South Napa Earthquake (FEMA P-1024)

On August 24, 2014, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake occurred in Napa, California. In response to this earthquake, the Special Projects task of the National Earthquake Technical Assistance Program (NETAP) was used to fund an investigation. At the time, this event had not yet been declared a federal disaster, and disaster funds were therefore not available. Because of limitations to this funding, some issues, such as performance of lifelines or building investigations in additional areas, could not be investigated. Past earthquakes in California have resulted in significant improvements to national and local building codes. For the 2014 South Napa earthquake, work was focused on documenting the observed performance of buildings and nonstructural components in order to lead into future improvements in future building codes, and to do so within six months.

The goal of the project was to assess and document the performance of a population of buildings impacted by the earthquake and develop a series of recommendations to further improve mitigation.

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FEMA P-787, Catalog of FEMA Building Science Branch Publications and Training Courses

Now in its fifth edition, this catalog includes descriptions of available FEMA publications, training courses, and workshops for natural hazards. The publication descriptions are first organized by primary hazard (earthquake, flood, high wind, multi-hazard, and other), and then by stakeholder groups: individuals and homeowners, teachers and kids, private sector and small business, community planning and policy, building professionals and engineers (contractors, builders, engineers, and architects), and Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) reports, which are applicable to all stakeholders. Listings are further arranged by subject areas and in order of publication date (the most recent first) in the text. These materials are also listed by FEMA publication number in Table 1 starting on page 107. Each listing includes a set of icons that indicates the applicable hazards and whether the resource is available online, on CD, and/or in print.

At present the fifth edition is only available as a download. The print and CD versions will be available in the near future.

You can order this item as a CD or a hardcopy from the FEMA Distribution Center.

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FEMA P-774, Unreinforced Masonry Buildings and Earthquakes Developing Successful Risk Reduction Programs

This publication provides guidance on reducing the risks faced by those who own, occupy, or use unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings in seismically active areas. Among structures currently in use in U.S. communities, URM buildings are typically the most vulnerable to earthquake damage and the type of construction that is most commonly singled out for voluntary and mandatory seismic risk reduction programs. The publication includes illustrations and photographs of URM buildings and describes their seismic vulnerabilities. It discusses policy and regulatory issues that often must be considered in efforts to reduce URM risks, such as retrofit costs, the economic viability of older buildings, numbers of occupants and types of use, and historic or architectural values. Rather than prescribing a rigid sequence of steps for URM risk reduction, FEMA P-774 documents a wide variety of successful approaches that have been developed across the United States.

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FEMA P-767, Earthquake Mitigation for Hospitals

This PowerPoint presentation is based on FEMA 396, Incremental Seismic Rehabilitation of Hospital Buildings: Providing Protection to People and Buildings. Recognizing that seismic mitigation can be expensive and disruptive, the purpose of this workshop is to introduce you to an innovative approach to seismic mitigation called “incremental seismic rehabilitation.” The approach essentially identifies systematic “opportunities” to conduct mitigation activities. Students are introduced to earthquake hazards in health care settings and learn about methods that can be used to analyze and reduce risks of damage in hospitals and other medical buildings. By implementing sound, cost-effective mitigation measures, health care facilities can reduce or eliminate seismic risks and ensure that, in the event of an earthquake, they can remain in operation to serve their communities.

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FEMA P-751, 2009 NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions: Design Examples

This publication provides a series of design examples using the 2009 edition of the NEHRP Recommended Provisions (FEMA P-750) for different types of construction materials and building configurations. These design examples demonstrate the design procedures used in the NEHRP Recommended Provisions, which serve as the basis for the nation's building codes, and make an excellent instructional tool.

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FEMA P-750, NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Buildings and Other Structures

The 2009 edition of the NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions is the seventh update since the first publication in 1985. This new edition adopts ASCE/SEI 7-05 by reference, which allows the Provisions to resume its role as the resource for introducing new knowledge, innovative concepts, and design methods to improve the national seismic standards and codes. The Provisions are presented in a new one-volume format with three parts. Part 1 adopts ASCE/SEI 7-05 by reference and presents consensus approved modifications to the reference standard. Part 2 provides a completely rewritten commentary that explains how to design using the reference standard. Part 3 comprises a series of resource papers that focus on emerging seismic design concepts and methods for exposure to and trial use by the design community and on issues that have proven historically difficult or complex to adequately codify. FEMA P-750 CD contains the Provisions, design maps, and other supporting materials.