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What to expect after you apply for FEMA AID

A blue and grey graphic explaining what happens after you apply for assistance. It reads as follows: What to expect after you apply for FEMA aid. You may receive an application to apply for a low-interest long-term SBA loan. Completing the SBA loan application is an important step in finding out what aid may be available to you. As a homeowner you may borrow up to $200,000 to repair/replace your primary residence, and up to $40,000 to repair/replace personal property. You are not required to accept the loan in order to receive FEMA assistance, but it may enable you to be considered for additional types of assistance. An inspector will contact you to schedule a visit. Be ready to keep your scheduled appointment. Appointments take 30-40 minutes and you must be present. Contact your insurance agent if you have insurance. Prove your identity. 

Show these documents:
-Photo ID: driver’s license or passport.
-Proof of occupancy: lease or utility bill.
-Proof of ownership: deed, title, mortgage payment book, or tax receipts.
(*This is not an exhaustive list.) 

During the Inspector’s Visit
Inspectors will…
-wear official FEMA ID badges.
-confirm your disaster registration number.
-review structural and personal property damages.
-ask you to sign official documentation.
-verify ownership and occupancy. 

Inspectors won’t….
-determine eligibility.
-cost any money.
-ask for credit card information.
-take the place of an insurance inspection. 

After the Inspector’s visit….
You will be sent a decision letter. 
If approved for aid:
-You will receive a check or an electronic funds transfer.
-A follow-up letter will explain how the money can be used. 

If you have questions regarding the letter, you can visit a Disaster Recovery Center in your area (fema.gov/drc) or call us at 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service). For TTY, call 800-462-7585.

A graphic describing what happens after you register for disaster assistance with FEMA.

Photo by FEMA Graphic - Sep 03, 2017
Last Updated: October 27, 2017