Fiscal Year 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program - FAQs

Release Date:
May 13, 2022

The FY 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) is one of three grant programs that support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency’s focus on enhancing the ability of state, local, tribal and territorial governments, as well as nonprofit organizations, to prevent, prepare for, protect against, and respond to terrorist attacks. These grant programs are part of a comprehensive set of measures authorized by Congress and implemented by DHS to help strengthen the nation’s communities against potential terrorist attacks. The NSGP provides funding to nonprofit organizations at high risk of a terrorist attack for facility hardening and other physical security enhancements and activities.

About the Program

  1. What is the purpose of the fiscal year (FY) 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program? The FY 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) is one of three grant programs that support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency’s focus on enhancing the ability of state, local, tribal and territorial governments, as well as nonprofit organizations, to prevent, prepare for, protect against, and respond to terrorist attacks. These grant programs are part of a comprehensive set of measures authorized by Congress and implemented by DHS to help strengthen the nation’s communities against potential terrorist attacks. The NSGP provides funding to nonprofit organizations at high risk of a terrorist attack for facility hardening and other physical security enhancements and activities.  
  2. What legislation authorized funding for the FY 2022 NSGP?

    NSGP is authorized by the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2022 (Pub.L. No. 117-103) and Sections 2003 and 2004 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. No. 107-296), as amended (6 U.S.C. §§ 604 and 605).  

  3. How much funding is available under the FY 2022 NSGP? The total amount of funds available under the FY 2022 NSGP is $250.15 million:

    This represents an increase of $70.15 million from FY 2021; NSGP-UA and NSGP-S both increased by $35 million. In addition, CPF was not previously funded.

    • $125 million for NSGP-Urban Area (UA);
    • $125 million for NSGP-State (S); and
    • $150,000 for Community Project Funding (CPF).  
  4. What is the difference between NSGP-UA and NSGP-S?

    NSGP-UA provides funding to nonprofit organizations located within an FY 2022 Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI)-designated high-risk urban area. NSGP-S provides funding for nonprofit organizations located outside of FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas.

    The FY 2022 NSGP funding notice, which will be released no later than May 13, 2022, will include a list of the FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas.  

  5. When will the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice be released, and where will it be located? It will be issued no later than May 13, 2022, and will be available online at www.fema.gov/grants as well as on www.grants.gov.  

  6. How do I determine whether a nonprofit organization is eligible? To be eligible for the FY 2022 NSGP, a nonprofit organization must:

    • Meet the description under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) of 1986 and be exempt from tax under section 501(a) of such code;
    • For NSGP-UA, be located within one of the FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas; for NSGP- S, be located outside of the FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban areas; for CPF, be listed in the Joint Explanatory Statement accompanying the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2022; and
    • Be able to demonstrate, through the application, that the organization is at high risk of a terrorist attack.  
  7. How do nonprofit organizations apply? Eligible nonprofit organizations must apply to their State Administrative Agency (SAA) for NSGP funds. Nonprofits may not apply to FEMA directly. The SAA is the only eligible applicant and submits applications to FEMA on behalf of nonprofit organizations (sub-applicants). Contact your SAA for information on how to apply.  
  8. Which NSGP sub-program should I apply for?

    If the physical address of the nonprofit organization for which you are applying is within a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area, then you must apply to NSGP-UA. If the physical address of the nonprofit organization for which you are applying is outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area, then you must apply to NSGP-S. If you are unsure whether your nonprofit organization’s physical address is located within or outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area, contact your SAA. SAAs and nonprofits should be aware that the jurisdictions that comprise a high-risk urban area are not always the same as the jurisdictions that comprise the applicable metropolitan statistical area (MSA) for that same location.  

  9. What are ways that a nonprofit organization can demonstrate that it is at a high risk of a terrorist attack? Ways an organization can demonstrate that it is at high risk of a terrorist attack include but are not limited to:
    • Describe any incidents that have occurred at the facility.
    • Describe any threats (e.g., verbal threats, vandalization) made against the organization.
    • Describe current events with specific attention to incidents impacting organizations that have been targeted due to a similar mission, belief, or ideology.
    • Contact organizations/agencies that can provide information on the current threat environment, such as local law enforcement agencies, local emergency management offices, Federal Bureau of Investigation Field Offices, or Regional Protective Security Advisors. To reach a Protective Security Advisor, email Central@cisa.gov.  
  10. What kinds of security-related activities are allowable? Allowable costs include contract security, as well as planning, equipment, training, and exercises. Below are some examples:
    • Planning – activities related to the development of plans such as:
      • Security Risk Management Plans;
      • Continuity of Operations Plans; and
      • Response Plans.
    • Equipment –those items listed in the Authorized Equipment List as allowable under NSGP.
    • Training:
      • Active shooter training; and
      • Security training for employees or members of the organization.
    • Response exercises. For a complete description on allowable activities, see the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice and the Preparedness Grants Manual.  
  11. What is the maximum amount of funding I can apply for?

    For NSGP-UA and NSGP-S, nonprofit organization sub-applicants with one site may apply for up to $150,000 for that site. Sub-applicants with multiple sites may apply for up to $150,000 per site for up to three sites, for a maximum of $450,000 per sub-applicant. If a sub-applicant applies for projects at multiple sites, regardless of whether the projects are similar in nature, it must include an assessment of the risks unique to each site.

    If a nonprofit organization has physical locations both within and outside of a FY 2022 UASI-designated high-risk urban area, they may apply to both funding streams (NSGP-S and NSGP-UA) but may not exceed a total of three (3) applications. Applications that are received for the wrong program will be deemed ineligible.

    For CPF, the maximum the identified nonprofit can apply for is $150,000.  

  12. What do I need to submit to my SAA to apply for FY 2022 NSGP funds? Each eligible nonprofit organization must submit the following to their SAA:

    a)    Vulnerability Assessment A vulnerability assessment specific to the location/facility for which the nonprofit organization is applying. Currently, there are no other FEMA-specific requirements for the vulnerability assessment, but SAAs may have state-specific requirements. b)    NSGP Investment Justification (IJ) The IJ is a required application form used to apply for NSGP funds. It includes sections on the nonprofit organization’s risks, vulnerabilities, and the proposed projects that are intended to address or mitigate the identified risks and vulnerabilities. Proposed projects must be for the locations that the nonprofit occupies at the time of application. c)    Mission Statement A Mission Statement and any mission-implementing policies or practices that may elevate the organization’s risk must also be submitted to the SAA. The SAA will use the Mission Statement, along with the information provided in the IJ, to determine the central purpose of the organization and will validate the nonprofit ‘organization type’ selected by the nonprofit organization in the IJ. The organization type may be one of the following: 1) Ideology-based/Spiritual/Religious; 2) Educational; 3) Medical; or 4) Other. d)    Optional Supporting documentation related to actual incidents that have occurred at the location/facility, if applicable. This includes items such as police reports, insurance claims, or photographs; include a brief description of the items you are submitting in your IJ. e)    Any other SAA-required documentation Contact your SAA to get information on any additional requirements.

     

  13. What makes a strong IJ?

    • Clearly identified risks, including threats, vulnerabilities, and consequences;
    • Description of findings from a previously conducted vulnerability assessment;
    • Details of any incidents including description, dates, etc.;
    • A brief description of any supporting documentation (such as police reports or photographs) that is submitted as part of the application, if applicable;
    • Explanation of how the investments proposed will mitigate or address vulnerabilities identified in a vulnerability assessment;Verification that all proposed activities are allowable costs per the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice;
    • Verification that all proposed activities are allowable costs per the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice;
    • Realistic milestones that consider the Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) review process, if applicable; and
    • Description of the project manager(s) and level of experience.

       

  14. Can I apply for multiple locations/facilities for the same organization?

    Yes, you may apply for multiple locations of the same organization. However, for each location/facility that you apply for, you must: a)    Submit a complete IJ; b)    Have a vulnerability assessment specific to the location/facility that you are applying for; and c)    Ensure that the total amount you are requesting for all locations/facilities does not exceed $150,000 per site/$450,000 per application. You can apply under both funding streams but cannot exceed the maximum of three IJs per organization.  

  15. What is a period of performance and how long is it for NSGP? The period of performance is the amount of time you have to complete your proposed projects. For the NSGP, the period is 36 months; this includes any EHP considerations required for the project, if applicable. For more information on the EHP process see Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and EHP Directive & Instruction.  

  16. What is the application period and deadline? The application period starts when the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice is released, currently scheduled for no later than May 13, 2022. The application deadline for nonprofit organizations is determined by your SAA. Contact your SAA for details on the application deadline.  

  17. How will my application be reviewed or evaluated? FY 2022 NSGP applications will be scored by the SAA in coordination with its state, territory, and urban area partners, as applicable. The SAA will submit a prioritized list of IJs with all scores to FEMA. FEMA will review the highest SAA-scored applications. In the final scoring process, organizations that are at risk due to their ideology, beliefs, or mission are prioritized. Additionally, organizations that have never received NSGP funding and/or that are located in an underrepresented/underserved community (based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Social Vulnerability Index) are also prioritized. Based on the review process described above, FEMA will then make funding recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security. All final funding determinations will be made by the Secretary, who retains the discretion to consider other factors and information in addition to FEMA’s funding recommendations. For additional information on how IJs are reviewed and scored at the SAA and federal levels, please refer to the FY 2022 NSGP funding notice.  

  18. Why am I required to self-identify with one of the following four categories: 1) Ideology-based/Spiritual/ Religious; 2) Educational; 3) Medical; or 4) Other? As noted in question 17, organizations that are at heightened risk due to their ideology, beliefs or mission are prioritized in the final scoring process.  

  19. What are the requirements for nonprofit organizations to work with or share information with law enforcement? There are no requirements for information sharing between nonprofits and federal, state, local, tribal and/or territorial law enforcement. However, the NPSG grant does seek to bring nonprofit organizations into broader state and local preparedness efforts by removing barriers to communication and being more inclusive.  

  20. Is there a security review performed on my application? If yes, at what point in the process does this review take place, and what information is provided? Yes, there is a security review performed by the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis on prospective subrecipient nonprofit organizations. This review takes place after the competitive scoring and selection process is complete. The information provided is limited to the organization’s name and physical address, as submitted by the nonprofit.  

  21. What is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) tool? The SVI is used to help emergency response planners and public health officials identify and map communities that will mostly likely need support before, during, and after a hazardous event. The tool uses U.S. Census data to determine the social vulnerability of every census tract, or subdivisions of counties. More information on the SVI can be found at: CDC/ATSDR SVI Fact Sheet | Place and Health | ATSDR.  
  22. What other resources are available to address programmatic, technical and financial questions?
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Last updated May 13, 2022