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Ten years ago, Hurricane Sandy became one of the most-powerful storms to strike the most densely populated areas of our nation, killing 160 people and causing more than $65 billion in property damage. FEMA led a large-scale response that involved federal, state and local officials and resources to help the millions impacted from Florida to Maine and inland to West Virginia and Ohio, particularly those in the harder hit areas of New York and New Jersey.

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Around FEMA headquarters, this friendly face is a welcome sight. Quick to a smile and eager to educate those around him, Aaron Kubey is a positive force for inclusivity and effective communication.

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EMA Region 8 Regional Administrator Nancy Dragani oversees FEMA activities in the states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming and the 29 federally recognized tribal nations located in these states. Below she shares the importance of being prepared for earthquakes.

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FEMA Region 8 Building Science Specialist McGowan works in the Mitigation Division and serves as the regional earthquake program manager. He shares more about the work his team did after the 2021 Marshall fire and how he works to mitigate the impact of future wildfires.

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FEMA Deputy Administrator Erik A. Hooks discusses the Great ShakeOut – and why you should participate in the international earthquake drill.

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October is National Community Planning Month, where we highlight the importance of mitigation planning in everyday life. Planning is the best step state, local, tribal and territorial governments can take to build a safer tomorrow. It helps us assess natural hazard risk in their communities and understand how it is changing. Planning also allows us to craft an equitable process that builds long-term, risk informed plans.

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After a disaster, you may feel overwhelmed and unsure of how to move forward. The road to recovery can be intimidating, but you are not alone. It’s important to ask for help as you navigate each step of the process. One of the best places to get direct help is at a Disaster Recovery Center (DRC).

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When communities come together after disasters like Hurricane Ian, we are reminded that recovery is a whole community effort.  From creating shelter space to providing comfort dogs, there are many ways response organizations come forward to aid in the recovery process. Every day, FEMA is honored to work with these voluntary, faith-based and private sector partners to help those affected by disasters.

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Disasters can leave behind a trail of destruction. Sometimes, this includes items in your home that hold great sentimental, historic or monetary value to you or a family member. Here are four steps save your family treasures after a disaster.

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Millions of Americans across the country have been affected by disasters, from Alaska to Puerto Rico, from Florida to South Carolina. FEMA is not slowing down as it continues to respond and help disaster survivors.

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Last updated September 9, 2021