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FEMA Media Library

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FEMA 338, Building Performance Assessment Team (BPAT) Report - Hurricane Georges in the Gulf Coast

This report presents FEMA's Building Performance Assessment Team's (BPAT) observations on the success and failure of buildings in the Florida Keys and Gulf Coast areas of the United States to withstand the wind and flood forces generated by Hurricane Georges. Recommendations to improve the building performance in future natural disasters in this area are included as well.

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FEMA 290, Mitigation Assessment Team Report: Hurricane Fran in North Carolina

On September 5, 1996, Hurricane Fran made landfall near Cape Fear, North Carolina. Coastal areas experienced significant erosion and scour. Erosion caused by Hurricane Fran was exacerbated by the previous dune erosion caused by Hurricane Bertha, which made landfall in the same area only two months earlier. The MAT observed very little damage in some areas, where velocity flows, wave action, and severe erosion occurred. The successful performance of buildings in these areas demonstrates the value of compliance with the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) requirements.

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FEMA Daily Public Assistance Grant Awards Activity 04-19-2021

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FEMA Daily Public Assistance Grant Awards Activity 04-19-2021

A collage of members of the Klamath Tribal receiving the the COVID-19 Vaccine.

Klamath Tribal Health United Against Covid

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FEMA 281, Mitigation Assessment Team Report: Hurricane Opal in Florida

Hurricane Opal made landfall on October 4, 1995, as a Category 3 storm. Fifteen counties in the Florida Panhandle were declared Federal disaster areas. Field inspections were concentrated along a 200-mile stretch of Florida's Gulf of Mexico shoreline. Most of the structural damage associated with the storm was caused by coastal flood forces: storm surge, wind-generated waves, storm-induced erosion, and floodborne debris. The types of structural damage included slab foundations, pile and pier foundations, and framing systems. Recommendations for reconstruction include the application of v-zone construction requirements; construction materials should meet or exceed the minimum requirements for building materials in the Standard Building Code; slab and grade beams designed as freestanding structural elements; and pile, post, column, and pier foundations designed to accommodate all design flood, wind, and other loads simultaneously.

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Protecting School Children from Tornadoes: State of Kansas School Shelter Initiative

As a result of the May 3, 1999 tornado event, damaged counties in Kansas received a Presidential disaster declaration and financial assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Because the event clearly evidenced that additional protection was needed for Kansas’ school children, work began to find a way to construct tornado shelters in Kansas schools. FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), as well as supplemental appropriations from Congress, provided funding for damage-prevention projects after the tornadoes. The State of Kansas School Shelter Initiative case study showcases several school shelter projects.

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Planning-Related Activities Using Hazard Mitigation Grant Program 7-Percent Funding

The funding for planning-related activities falls under Title 44 of
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 201.3(c)(4),
where up to 7 percent of a recipient’s HMGP funding can be used
for mitigation planning in accordance with 44 CFR Section
206.434. Within this percentage, there are no limits on the dollar
value of the planning-related activity or the number of planning
activities that can be submitted on behalf of a community.

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Considerations for Local Mitigation Planning Grant Subapplicants

This Job Aid will guide local communities and tribal subapplicants as they pursue planning grant funding under the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Program. It provides considerations for the development of a planning grant scope of work with the goal of encouraging strong, comprehensive planning grant subapplications. The Job Aid also addresses considerations for cost estimates.

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Tribal Mitigation Planning and HMA Grant Application Development

This Job Aid is designed to help tribes complete a planning grant/subgrant application that, once approved, will yield a complete and actionable mitigation plan.