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Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Post Fire

This section contains information about FEMA's Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire. The purpose of this page is to connect individuals, state, local, and tribal government representatives with the resources they need to implement hazard mitigation measures in their communities after wildfire disasters.

Wildfires can destroy homes, businesses, infrastructure, natural resources, and agriculture. They can also increase secondary hazards and leave areas prone to floods, erosion, and mudflows for many years.

FEMA is now providing mitigation assistance using HMGP funds for Fire Management Assistance declarations on or after October 5, 2018.  This assistance is called the HMGP Post Fire.  The Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA), Public Law 115-254, was enacted on October 5, 2018, and made numerous legislative changes to the Robert T. Stafford Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act). Section 1204 of the DRRA amended Section 404 of the Stafford Act to allow FEMA to provide HMGP assistance for hazard mitigation measures that substantially reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, loss, or suffering in any area affected by a major disaster, or any area affected by a fire for which assistance was provided under Section 420 Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG). The HMGP Post Fire framework is outlined in FEMA HMGP Post Fire Policy #207-088-2

 

This is an image of a fire with the text Fire Management Assistance Declaration Hazard Mitigation Grant Program - Post Fire
This is an image for the Fire Management Assistance Declaration Hazard Mitigation Grant Program - Post Fire.

HMGP Summary

The HMGP is an all hazards risk reduction grant program administered by applicants including states, federally-recognized tribes, and territories. The purpose of this page is to connect individuals, states, tribes, territories, and local government representatives with the resources they need to implement hazard mitigation measures in their communities. For additional information, visit the HMGP page.

Information for Applicants

States, federally-recognized tribes, and territories affected by fires resulting in an FMAG declaration on or after October 5, 2018, are eligible to apply.

The application period opens with the state or territory's first FMAG declaration of the fiscal year and closes 6 months after the end of that fiscal year.  Application extensions may be requested.

This image of two sheets of paper shows that after an applicant receives funding notification from FEMA, the HMGP - Post Fire application is due to FEMA within six months after the end of the current FY.
This image shows that after an applicant receives funding notification from FEMA, the HMGP - Post Fire application is due to FEMA within six months after the end of the current FY.

Project Types and Location

FEMA encourages the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP is available for the risk reduction of any hazard. Funding will be made available to the declared county or counties. The mitigation project may be outside of this area as long as the risk reduction benefits the declared county or counties (e.g., watershed mitigation). If funding cannot be used in these areas, then it may be available statewide. Applicants must detail their respective implementation and management processes, including deadlines, in their HMGP Administrative Plan. Assistance will also be available for federally-recognized tribal governments with burned land from declared wildfires.

For additional questions regarding tribal eligibility, please contact your Regional Tribal Liaison.

Current Fire Management Assistance Designated Areas:

To see a map of the Fire Management Assistance Designated Areas, click the map above.

Funding Calculations

The funding amount available will be provided by FEMA and reflects a national aggregate calculation based on an average of historical Fire Management Assistance designations from the last 10 years. This amount will be recalculated at the beginning of each fiscal year.

The total HMGP Post Fire funding available for each Fire Management Assistance declaration is currently $454,432 for applicants with standard hazard mitigation plans, and $605,909 for applicants with enhanced hazard mitigation plans.

This image displays the definitions of Standard and Enhanced hazard mitigation plans.

Funding from multiple events shall be aggregated into one grant under the first declaration, unless the applicant notifies FEMA they will not be aggregating. Aggregation supports larger projects, streamlined grants management, and expedited closeout.

Pictured are two circles that display the aggregation examples for standard and enhanced hazard mitigation plans.This example shows the aggregation of three FMAG declarations with standard or enhanced Applicant hazard mitigation plans resulting in one grant for $1.36 million or $1.8 million, respectively.
This example shows the aggregation of three FMAG declarations with standard or enhanced Applicant hazard mitigation plans resulting in one grant for $1.36 million or $1.8 million, respectively.

This example illustrates how the aggregation of three FMAG declarations for applicants with standard or enhanced hazard mitigation plans results in one HMGP Post Fire grant for $1.3 million or $1.8 million, respectively.

HMGP Post Fire follows current guidance with the following exceptions:

  1. A FMAG declaration rather than a Presidential major disaster declaration activates HMGP assistance.
  2. Assistance is first available for counties that receive FMAG declarations. If the county cannot use the funding it may be available statewide. Applicants must detail their respective implementation and management processes, with deadlines, in their HMGP Administrative Plan.
  3. HMGP funding amounts are based on a national aggregate for each FMAG declaration, and HMGP assistance shall be aggregated under the first declaration.
  4. There is an extended application period from date of the first FMAG declaration of the fiscal year until 6 months after the end of that fiscal year. An application extension may be requested.

Tools and Resources for Application Development

Guidance:

HMGP Post Fire utilizes the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) Guidance published in February 2015. Wildfire mitigation projects are detailed in the HMA Guidance Addendum.

Pre-Calculated Benefits:

Projects are required to be cost-effective, meaning future benefits must equal or exceed project costs. Typically, cost-effectiveness is analyzed using the Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA) software toolkit. However, in an effort to streamline the HMA grant application process, FEMA has determined that certain project types (including post-wildfire mitigation) that meet specific criteria are cost-effective. Projects that qualify for these pre-calculated benefits do not require a separate BCA.

Pre-calculated benefits of $5,250 per acre are available for the following post-wildfire mitigation project types:

  • Soil stabilization
  • Flood diversion
  • Reforestation projects

To use the pre-calculated benefits, the applicant would multiply the number of acres being mitigated by the total benefits per acre. For example, if a soil stabilization project will provide ground cover, soil stabilization, and replanting for 1,000 acres; the pre-calculated benefits  would be calculated by multiplying 1,000 (the number of acres included in the project) x $5,250 (pre-calculated benefit per acre) resulting in $5,250,000 in project benefits. If the total project cost is less than or equal to the calculated project benefits, then the project is determined to be cost-effective and no separate BCA is required.

If the pre-calculated benefits are not greater than the project costs, the BCA Toolkit can be used to perform a traditional BCA.

Helpful Links

FEMA is partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer’s Silver Jackets Team on flood mitigation post fire: http://silverjackets.nfrmp.us/

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Post Fire

FEMA places a high priority on supporting wildfire recovery through the use of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). To advance risk reduction after Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) program declarations, FEMA is announcing a permanent HMGP Post Fire grant program.

As amended, Section 404 authorizes FEMA to provide HMGP assistance for hazard mitigation measures that substantially reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, loss, or suffering in any area affected by a major disaster, or any area affected by a fire for which assistance was provided under Section 420.

Section 1204 of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act (DRRA) also amended Section 420 of the Stafford Act to parallel the change in Section 404 of the Stafford Act.  Section 420 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA to provide assistance under its FMAG program for the mitigation, management, and control of any fire that threatens such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. As amended, Section 420(d) states that “whether or not a major disaster is declared, the President may provide hazard mitigation assistance in accordance with Section 404 in any area affected by a fire for which assistance was provided under Section 420.

These changes to Sections 404 and 420 mean that unlike traditional HMGP, the availability of this hazard mitigation assistance is not contingent on the declaration of a major Presidential disaster. This assistance, triggered by an FMAG declaration, is named, and referred to herein as, HMGP Post Fire.

Q1: Who is eligible to apply for these funds?
A1: States, tribes and territories in an area affected by a fire for which assistance was provided under a FMAG for declarations can apply. Federally-recognized tribes with burned land as a result of an FMAG may apply directly to FEMA as applicants after an FMAG declaration has been made for the state or territory. Federally-recognized tribes may also be eligible to apply as subapplicants. Local governments should apply as subapplicants to their state. All applicants must have a FEMA-approved mitigation plan to receive HMGP funding. Events after October 5, 2018, are eligible to apply for HMGP Post Fire grants.

Q2: What is the application period?
A2: FEMA will send a formal funding notification letter to eligible applicants outlining the dates of the application period for fiscal year. The application period opens with the applicant's first FMAG declaration of the fiscal year and ends 6 months after the beginning of the next fiscal year. Two 90-day application extensions may be requested.

Q3: What project types are eligible for HMGP Post Fire assistance?
A3: FEMA encourages the use of HMGP Post Fire to mitigate wildfire and related hazards, such as flood or erosion. However, HMGP Post Fire is available for the risk reduction of any hazard. The project may be outside of the declared county or counties if the risk reduction benefits the declared county or counties (e.g., such as those intersecting/inside a watershed).

  • Some eligible wildfire project types are listed below. For further detail, see the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Guidance (HMA Guidance), published in February 2015.
    • Defensible space measures: The creation of perimeters around residential and non-residential buildings and structures through the removal or reduction of flammable vegetation. 
    • Ignition-resistant construction: The application of non-combustible building envelope assemblies, the use of ignition-resistant materials, and the use of proper retrofit techniques in new and existing structures. 
    • Hazardous fuels reduction: Vegetation management to reduce hazardous fuels, vegetation thinning, and the reduction of flammable materials to protect life and property beyond defensible space perimeters but proximate to at-risk structures.

Q4: Where is funding available?
A4: Assistance is available first for counties that receive declarations. The project may be outside of the declared area as long as the risk reduction benefits the declared county or counties (e.g., watershed mitigation). If funding cannot be used in these areas, for reasons such as hazard mitigation plan status or lack of cost share, it may be available statewide.

Q5: How is funding calculated?
A5: FEMA will provide a national aggregate calculation based on an average of historical Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) designations from the last 10 years. The total HMGP Post Fire funding amount available for each FMAG declaration is $454,432 for applicants with a standard hazard mitigation plan and $605,909 for applicants with an enhanced hazard mitigation plan.

Q6: How does a tribal government become an applicant or subapplicant?
A6: Following a atate or territory receipt of an FMAG declaration, a federally-recognized tribe with burned land may apply to FEMA for HMGP Post Fire assistance as an applicant. Tribal governments may also apply through states as subapplicants. If tribal land is not burned, subapplicant funding may be unavailable because it is prioritized for declared areas.

Q7: How is funding apportioned for federally-recognized tribes applying to FEMA as recipients?
A7: Funding will be apportioned based on each recipient's burned acreage. The apportionment will be calculated based on the amount of each recipient’s burned acreage as a percentage of the allotment to which they are entitled under the FMAG.

Q8: Who has final authority of apportionment determinations?
A8: FEMA Regional Administrators will have final authority on apportionment determinations.

Q9: What guidance is available for applicants?
A9: The applicable guidance is the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Guidance (HMA Guidance), published in February 2015. It can be accessed at www.fema.gov/medialibrary/assets/documents/103279.

Q10: What additional resources are available?
A10: The following websites are resources for applicants:

Last Updated: 
07/24/2019 - 14:29