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Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC)

This is a view of the Houston, Texas Skyline.  As envisioned, the new Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program will support states, local communities, tribes and territories, as they undertake hazard mitigation projects reducing the risks they face from disasters and natural hazards.

This page provides general information about a new pre-disaster hazard mitigation program.

What is BRIC

Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) will support states, local communities, tribes and territories, as they undertake hazard mitigation projects reducing the risks they face from disasters and natural hazards. BRIC is a new FEMA pre-disaster hazard mitigation program that replaces the existing Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) program and is a result of amendments made to Section 203 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act) by Section 1234 of the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 (DRRA).

The BRIC program guiding principles are supporting communities through capability- and capacity-building; encouraging and enabling innovation; promoting partnerships; enabling large projects; maintaining flexibility; and providing consistency.

Purpose

Reducing Risk through Hazard Mitigation

The Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program aims to categorically shift the federal focus away from reactive disaster spending and toward research-supported, proactive investment in community resilience. FEMA anticipates BRIC funding projects that demonstrate innovative approaches to partnerships, such as shared funding mechanisms, and/or project design. For example, an innovative project may bring multiple funding sources or in-kind resources from a range of private and public sector stakeholders or offer multiple benefits to a community in addition to the benefit of risk reduction.

Through BRIC, FEMA will continue to invest in a variety of mitigation activities with an added focus on infrastructure projects, and community lifelines.

Anticipated Timeline

This graphic illustrates the estimated process and timing of the BRIC roll out, subject to change.

FEMA created image to show what phase of development we are with the new Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program.  Currently, we are in the Policy Review phase that began fall of 2019 through spring 2020.  This timeline is subject to change.

Where Are We Now?

Since the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 (DRRA) was signed into law FEMA has been working to develop the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) policy and program. FEMA also made a record-breaking $250 million available for pre-disaster hazard mitigation under our existing PDM grant program in fiscal year 2019 – including $125 million specifically for infrastructure projects.

What’s Next?

FEMA intends to publish a proposed BRIC policy in the Federal Register for public comment in the spring of 2020.  When the proposed policy is published, stakeholders may provide new comments.  The policy will be broad and intended to establish the framework and requirements for BRIC.  Each year FEMA will post a Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) on grants.gov providing detailed program information and other grant application and administration requirements.

Following the review and adjudication of comments received on the proposed policy, FEMA anticipates finalizing the policy and releasing a NOFO by the fall of 2020. This timing is subject to change.

Summary of Stakeholder Feedback

This is an image of the 72-page summary of the stakeholder feedback FEMA received on the development of the new Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) that provides information about stakeholder concerns and recommendations to address those concerns.To support the development of the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program, FEMA engaged in a comprehensive stakeholder engagement process in 2019 that leveraged an online crowd-sourcing platform, virtual and in-person listening sessions. FEMA heard from federal, state, tribal, and territorial stakeholders, as well as local partners, and members of the general public about the challenges they face in implementing mitigation projects and recommendations for how BRIC can be responsive to their mitigation needs at all levels of government. 

In total, FEMA received 75 formal letters and approximately 5,000 comments with feedback from engagements and emails. The stakeholder feedback was compiled into a 72-page summary that provides information about the concerns expressed by stakeholders and their recommendations to address those concerns. 

Please review the Summary of Stakeholder Feedback report.

Last Updated: 
03/27/2020 - 08:34