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Hazard Mitigation Planning and Resilient Communities Story Maps

FEMA uses interactive story maps to help explain the Risk MAP (mapping, assessment and planning) process, coastal flood risk, use of FEMA mapping data, mitigation planning, and other programs.

Explore Success Stories

Browse FEMA’s collection of interactive story maps about hazard mitigation success stories.

Coastal Story Maps

Flood Risk Products Story Maps

Cooperating Technical Partners Recognition Program Story Maps

Mitigation Planning Story Maps

Coastal Story Maps

An Introduction to FEMA Coastal Floodplain Mapping

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Thumbnail preview of a Story Map on ArcGIS

This tutorial explains coastal hazards, identifies common features of flood maps for coastal areas and shows how to determine the flood zone and flood elevation for coastal properties using flood maps.

This is a tutorial on how coastal risks are shown on Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), or flood maps. It helps you better understand how to read and use flood maps in coastal communities.

View the Intro to FEMA Coastal Floodplain Mapping Story Map

Thinking Beyond Flood Maps: Using FEMA Coastal Data to Reduce Risk and Build Resilience

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Thumbnail preview of a Story Map on ArcGIS

In the United States, 7 of the 10 most expensive disasters were caused by coastal storms. However, coastal communities are using flood risk data in powerful ways to build resilience.

Communities can learn how to use data and products developed during FEMA coastal flood risk studies to make resilient decisions. Through case studies, communities can see how diverse places from across the country have used these resources to reduce their risk.

View the Thinking Beyond Flood Maps Story Map

Flood Risk Products Story Maps

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Learn more about Flood Risk Products.

FEMA Story Map on Flood Risk Products

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Thumbnail preview of a Story Map on ArcGIS

Flooding is the costliest and most common natural disaster in the United States. Local leaders and decision makers can face tough choices in prioritizing which mitigation steps best help communities withstand major floods.

Most communities are familiar with using Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs), or flood maps, to guide sound floodplain management decisions. FEMA also created Flood Risk Products to be used with the required flood maps.

Flood Risk Products are nonregulatory, ready-made sources that provide more extensive, user-friendly flood hazard information. They include the Flood Risk Database, Flood Risk Map and Flood Risk Report.

View the Flood Risk Products Story Map

Lycoming County, Pennsylvania: Using FEMA's Flood Risk Products to Improve Community Resilience

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Thumbnail preview of a Story Map on ArcGIS

This case study highlights how local community leaders explained what the new flood maps meant for the community. It also addressed concerns about what changes in flood risks meant for local homeowners and businesses and to the community’s long-term economic and social resiliency.

Community leaders were able to use Flood Risk Products to identify areas at the highest risk for flooding to prioritize mitigation actions. In addition, community leaders used Flood Risk Products to develop communications about flood risks to residents and businesses. 

View the Lycoming County, PA Story Map

Mitigation Planning Story Maps

The Mitigation Planning Program helps communities prevent the natural disaster impacts by providing training, tools and resources to help them plan for and reduce risk. This story map shares success stories for mitigation plans that go above and beyond the minimum planning requirements. Other communities can duplicate these successes to build resilience and reduce disaster losses. If you have a success story worth sharing, email the Mitigation Planning Program.

View the Mitigation Planning Success Stories Story Map

Cooperating Technical Partners Recognition Program Story Maps

FEMA launched the Cooperating Technical Partners Recognition Program in 2017 to recognize participating partners who demonstrate flood mapping program proficiency and best practices in management, technology, innovation, mapping and/or communications. Nominations are reviewed by hundreds of industry peers who award recipients first place and honorable mention. As a result of receiving this recognition, FEMA works with the recipient to create a story map about their award-winning efforts.

2020 Winners

First Place

Harris County (Texas) Flood Control District

For more than 20 years, the Harris County Flood Control District has partnered with FEMA’s Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) program resulting in a more flood-resilient Harris County.

In 2020, FEMA recognized the district for the fourth annual CTP Recognition Award for its series of flood risk communication products and public-facing interactive mapping tools that promoted floodplain management, risk awareness, mitigation actions, and education.

View the Harris County Story Map

Honorable Mention

Nebraska Department of Natural Resources

In 2020, Nebraska DNR was awarded Honorable Mention for the annual CTP Recognition Program award for its response to the 2019 flood disaster while maintaining an active presence with FEMA. Nebraska DNR collected key data and carried out CTP activities through excellent leadership and use of online outreach tools by an experienced team of communicators.

View the Nebraska Story Map

2019 Winners

First Place

Indiana Department of Natural Resources

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was recognized in 2019 for the annual CTP Recognition Program for excellence in the development of tools and resources. Their use of technology to communicate higher regulatory standards and flood risks is a valuable resource for local floodplain managers. 

View the Indiana Story Map

Honorable Mention

Iowa Department of Natural Resources

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was recognized in 2019 for the annual CTP Recognition Award for excellence in outreach and communications. Their Draft Flood Hazard Outreach Program increases disaster preparedness and promotes local mitigation investments.

View the Iowa Story Map

2018 Winners

First Place

Kentucky Division of Water

In 2018, the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) received a first-place award for the annual CTP Recognition Award. KDOW received the award for enhancing traditional communications by integrating the use of different mediums within technology to communicate flood risks and embrace a variety of partnerships.

View the Kentucky Story Map

Honorable Mention

Georgia Department of Natural Resources

In 2018, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received honorable mention for the annual CTP Recognition Program for its development of tools and resources in the flood mapping program. The assortment of communication tools help elected officials and their constituents understand each step of the flood mapping process as well as provides resources for local floodplain managers.

View the Georgia Story Map

2017 Winners

First Place

San Antonio River Authority

In 2017, the San Antonio River Authority received first place for the inaugural CTP Recognition Program. They were selected for its holistic watershed master planning and floodplain management best practices. 

View the San Antonio River Story Map

Honorable Mention

Illinois State Water Survey

In 2017, the Illinois State Water Survey received an honorable mention for the inaugural CTP Recognition Program. ISWS was selected for its Coordinated Hazard Assessment and Mapping Program (CHAMP). CHAMP creates innovative products and engages partners to act to prevent losses from flooding and other natural hazards.

View the Illinois Story Map