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National Night Out Shows How Community Preparedness is a Team Effort

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After I left the office on August 6, 2013, I went to the annual “Crime Prevention and National Night Out” celebration sponsored by the Springfield Police Department, Delaware County, PA, the Target Corporation, along with local businesses. National Night Out's goal is to “heighten crime and drug prevention, gain support for local anti-crime efforts, strengthen neighborhood spirit, and let criminals know that Springfield residents are committed to keeps Springfield Township safe.”

National Night Out was successful in Delaware County because it represented the diversity of the community.  It also demonstrated that while communities are made up of many organizations, businesses, and individuals – we can all come together to support a common goal.  I’m both a Springfield resident and a volunteer firefighter with the Springfield Fire Department; and I represented FEMA Region III at the event by hosting a table. At my table I encouraged, educated, and talked to people about individual and family preparedness.

kids at national night out

It gave me a unique opportunity to educate my neighbors and fellow Springfield residents about being prepared as an individual and about why it’s important to make a plan, have a kit, and be informed. It was a lot of fun for me because I brought my family with me (see the photo above); plus I was able to meet with friends, Springfield residents, and fellow firemen; while promoting FEMA’s ”Whole Community” approach to emergency management. If you haven’t heard “Whole Community” before, it’s the idea that it takes everyone in the community (elected officials, residents, businesses, etc.) to prepare for, respond to, and recover from a disaster. 

national night out booth

Next to my table was the Delaware County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). Ed Kline is the Delaware County Volunteer Management Coordinator and was there with his local Delaware County CERT members in support of Ready Pennsylvania.  Ed and his team were there handing out Pennsylvania Emergency Preparedness Guides, Family and Pet Emergency Planning Guides and Ready Pennsylvania bags that had suggested items for a basic disaster supply kit. It was also a great chance to network with some of the local vendors that supported the event.

As I mentioned before, the event was successful because so many partners in the community were there.  In addition to FEMA and the Delaware County CERT team, other groups were there, like:

Events like National Night Out demonstrate the diversity of every community - and that it takes everyone working together to make our neighborhoods and cities more resilient.  Looking back at the event now, I’m amazed at how well my town came together, shared ideas, and got involved.

Sharing preparedness in your community doesn’t mean you need to wait for a formal event like National Night Out.  There are lots of events happening across the country and community.fema.gov is a great place to see the list.  And with National Preparedness Month coming up in September, now’s a great time to get inspired and host an event of your own!

I encourage all of you to get involved in your community to help everyone become better prepared for a disaster.

Editor’s Note: We are providing the following links to third party sites and organizations for your reference. FEMA does not endorse any non-government entities, ogranziations or services.

What We’re Watching: 8/23/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Photos of the week

secretary napolitano shakes hands with fema employeesQueens, N.Y., Aug. 23, 2013 -- Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano met with staff from FEMA and other agencies during a visit to the New York Joint Field Office, thanking them for their efforts in helping New York recover from Hurricane Sandy.

fema employee talks with community memberLong Beach Island, N.J., Aug. 18, 2013 -- Hazard Mitigation Community Education Outreach Task Force Crew Leader, Paul David Lear, speaks with Long Beach Island residents about techniques that can help minimize property damage in the event of severe weather like Hurricane Sandy at the Long Beach Island Arts Festival.

Summer weather continues

The severe weather over the last week shows what summer tends to bring – wildfires in the west, tropical storm and hurricane threats around the Atlantic, and severe storms across the country.  No matter where you live, make sure you’re staying current on the latest conditions:

  • For wildfires - InciWeb is where you can find the latest updates on wildfires happening across the U.S. It’s a site where interagency partners provide their updates, so it’s a great source for the latest on the ground information.  And for wildfire safety tips, visit www.Ready.gov/wildfires
  • For tropical storms and hurricanes - While there are currently no tropical storms or hurricanes threatening the U.S. or our territories, the National Hurricane Center website and mobile site are worth bookmarking on your computer and phone.  For what to do before, during, and after a tropical storm or hurricane, visit Ready.gov/hurricanes.
  • For severe storms & other weather – Visit the National Weather Service website or mobile site for the latest on severe weather advisories, watches, or warnings.  Ready.gov/severe-weather has details for staying safe, so check it out before severe weather threatens.

Adding “disaster reporting” into the FEMA app

For those of you that already have the FEMA app on your phone or tablet, you may have noticed an update over the last few weeks.  The team has been working hard to incorporate several new features and improvements, especially one feature called Disaster Reporter.  Disaster Reporter allows people to upload a photo of what they’re seeing during or after a disaster and submit it to a public map.

The updated FEMA app is currently available for Android and Apple devices – the updated Blackberry version is under development.

With that, have a safe weekend!

What we’re watching: 8/16/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

To round out the week, here are a few of the updates from around our digital channels that showcase what’s at the top of our list this week:

From Facebook: Peak hurricane season is here

Earlier this week, the FEMA Facebook page posted this graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  It shows the number of hurricanes and tropical storms over the last 100 years, and as you can see, we’re entering the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season:


hurricane historic data

And in line with this time of year, we’re currently monitoring a tropical depression in the Atlantic.  It’s still too early to tell whether it will have an impact on the U.S., but now’s the time to make sure you and your family are prepared for the rest of the hurricane season.  Two easy ways are to have a plan, should a hurricane threaten your community, and have emergency supplies standing ready at home, in your car, and at your workplace.   

Ready.gov/hurricanes is a great place to start your planning, or at http://m.fema.gov/hurricanes on your phone.

From the blog: AARP partnership

Earlier this week, I shared my thoughts about a new partnership between FEMA and the AARP.  Partnerships are critical to successful emergency management – as this video reinforces from Administrator Fugate and AARP CEO, Barry Rand:

So check out the blog post and let us know your thoughts!

From Twitter: National Preparedness Month

In case you didn’t know, September is National Preparedness Month.  It’s a time when FEMA and our partners make an extra effort to share the importance of people being prepared before a disaster strikes.  FEMA’s Ready campaign is a key player in National Preparedness Month, and this year they’ve made it easy to host your own preparedness event during September:

I encourage you to join the preparedness community at community.fema.gov and share how you’re planning on getting your family, business, or neighborhood better prepared for emergencies.

With that, have a great and safe weekend!

Relating Preparedness to Kids at a Home Improvement Store

home depot workshopBensalem, Pa., Aug. 1, 2013 -- FEMA staff joins with Home Depot to educate people on the importance of preparedness during a Hurricane Preparedness Workshop.

Great weather has a way of getting people outside – and in this case, it helped share the message of being prepared for emergencies.  On Saturday, July 27, the warm temperatures brought out hundreds of residents to their local Home Depot store for new tools and supplies so they could work on home improvement projects. In Downingtown, PA, people that arrived at their local Home Depot, saw various private sector, local, and state representatives who came together to encourage preparedness in the community.

We were there from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., talking to customers and answering questions about preparedness.  It gave us the opportunity to teach them about being prepared as an individual and the importance of making a plan, having a kit, and being informed. While interacting with people and answering questions was great, what really amazed me though was how interested kids are in talking about being better prepared.

After we all came back to the office on Monday, a coworker, Corey Rigby, told me about someone she spoke with at the Bensalem, PA store and the story really stuck with me. Grace is an 8 year old girl who went to the FEMA table with her dad. Grace kept talking preparedness and answered Corey’s questions to see if she was ready for a disaster. As Corey asked her about what to do in a hurricane, she knew right away to find a flashlight and stay inside.  After giving her a Ready Kids coloring book, her dad pulled her away to continue their day.

An hour later, Grace reappeared, dragging her dad back to the booth as she told Corey with excitement, “I want to learn more, ask me another question!” As she stood ready to prove that she knew what to do, Corey asked her several questions about how she would take care of her pets, where they would go if they need to evacuate, and what she would take with her. She proudly said that she’d take her stuffed animals, her parents, and their dog, but she wasn’t sure what else she would need.  Corey explained that her family needed to make an emergency supply kit, which they can take with them when evacuating.  Grace then turned to her dad and said, “I want to make one when we get home!” Her dad agreed that an emergency kit is important and thanked Corey as they walked away.  Corey’s story, just one of many that the Region III team had, stood out to me because it showed how a child can improve preparedness for the whole family and make a difference.

fema booth at home depotBensalem, Pa., Aug. 1, 2013 -- FEMA staff joins with Home Depot to educate people on the importance of preparedness during a Hurricane Preparedness Workshop.

I was able to speak with children and their families and a number of other stakeholders; including representatives from SERVPRO, Allstate Insurance, Generac Power Systems, Chester County Emergency Services, the Pennsylvania National Guard, Downingtown Fire Department, Downingtown Police Department, and Phoenixville Dive Rescue Team. I talked to them about FEMA’s upcoming National Preparedness Month and where they can find the new 2013 toolkit for sharing preparedness in their community.

I want to commend Home Depot on their Hurricane Preparedness Workshop; it was an excellent event and extremely well organized. The fine people from Home Depot were wonderful hosts who did a great job of bringing the Whole Community together – and the great weather didn’t hurt either.

AARP & FEMA: Building resilience through partnerships

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signing ceremony

Effectively responding to disasters requires a team, but not just any team.  This team needs to be as diverse, multi-faceted, and as talented as the fabric of America itself.  Because of this, FEMA is always looking for opportunities to strengthen the team that prepares for, responds to, and recovers from emergencies.   

I’m proud that last week FEMA took a step in bolstering this collection of partners by signing a partnership agreement with the AARP.  Here’s Administrator Fugate and AARP CEO Barry Rand at the signing ceremony:

As Administrator Fugate and Mr. Rand said, the partnership between FEMA and AARP is all about building resilience in homes, neighborhoods, and communities around the U.S.  That could mean providing information so people understand the disaster risks in their area, ensuring Americans are aware of assistance and services that are available after a disaster, or sharing best practices so people rebuild their homes and communities to make more resilient after a disaster strikes.

I hope the partnership inspires you to take action to make your family, home, business, or neighborhood better prepared for a disaster.  Since we’re in the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season, now is a great time to review your family’s emergency plan and ensure your emergency supply kit is stocked and ready, just in case.   In addition to FEMA’s Ready.gov/hurricanes page, another great place for information on preparing for hurricanes or tropical storms is the AARP “Operation Hurricane Prepare”. It has a handy checklist and videos that put preparedness actions at the forefront.

Finally, check out the the AARP blog for their take on the partnership and details on how AARP members are already lending a helping hand in disaster response. One way is through Createthegood.org, which pulls together volunteering opportunities and stories on how volunteering is making a positive impact in communities around the country.

Partnerships are so critical to emergency management – I’m glad to welcome AARP as FEMA’s newest formal partner!

Law Enforcement’s Role in Responding to Disasters

If you have ever had the chance to speak with Administrator Fugate or listen to him discuss the role of first responders in disasters… you will know he views their work with a revered appreciation.  They are an intricate part of the emergency/disaster response team.  As a former Police Chief, I can attest to their hard work and dedication and agree whole heartedly with Administrator Fugate.

In my 30 year career I have witnessed heroic efforts by my officers and colleagues, including during times of disasters.  While serving Prince George’s County, we responded to 9/11, Hurricane Isabel, snowstorms, and multiple tornadoes.  Specifically, I recall one of the tornadoes that impacted my county.  An EF-3 tornado impacted the nearby college campus and devastated neighborhoods and infrastructure.  Emergency services were stretched to the max.  Our officers worked relentless hours, 48 hours straight in some cases, setting up and supporting emergency response and rescue operations.  The scene was chaotic with debris and terrified college students, but the right training helped officers maintain public safety and conduct lifesaving missions. 

Over the last two years I have had the distinct privilege of sharing the Administrator’s views with the law enforcement community and recently, he reflected on Law Enforcement’s Role in Responding to Disasters in an article in Police Chief Magazine

We ask a tremendous amount of our first responders during disasters and emergencies. They are the first line of defense; they are the first helping hand extended to survivors. Every police officer knows emergencies can happen without notice. Our ability to respond to and recover from disasters is directly influenced by how well prepared our first responders are and how well we all work together as a team before, during, and after a crisis. 

The role of law enforcement in responding to a disaster is very similar to the day-to-day role of public safety and supporting the community. In preparing for a disaster, police officers trust in their training and capitalize on their knowledge of a community. Exercises portraying the situations (large- and small-scale events) help better prepare officers and allow them to fully understand the resources needed for each event and apply that information to each community’s needs. Law enforcement officials know their communities best and interact with residents on a daily basis. This knowledge gives them the ability to provide valuable situational awareness to response and recovery groups coming in to help. For example, where will there be language barriers? Does the community have unique challenges? Law enforcement can help communicate this information to the emergency management team and can offer support to other members of the team by simply being a presence in the neighborhoods.

During a disaster, police officers play a key role in many operations including: search and rescue, evacuations, door-to-door checks, and maintaining overall public safety within the community. These are critical actions that support not only their own communities but neighboring towns as well. 

As the Administrator explained in the article, the law enforcement community has two vital roles in responding to disasters:

  • As first responders during times of crisis, and
  • Providing for the safety and security of the community. 

Responding to disasters is a shared responsibility, and those in law enforcement are aware that emergency management planning is for all hazards and that it takes a team effort to keep our communities safe.  I’m proud to represent the law enforcement community at FEMA as we continue to strengthen the coordination among the entire emergency management team.

Editor’s Note: Police Chief Magazine is a publication from the International Association of Chiefs of Police and serves as the professional voice of law enforcement and supports programs and research, as well as training and other professional services for the law enforcement community.

What We’re Watching: 8/9/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Weather Outlook

According to our friends at the National Weather Service, heavy rainfall with the potential for flooding is expected to continue across Northern Oklahoma and Arkansas.  Additionally, some rainfall with thunderstorms is possible from the Mid-Mississippi valley across the Mid-South, Carolinas, and Virginia. For folks in these areas here are some flood safety tips to keep in mind:

  • Driving through a flooded area can be extremely hazardous. Almost half of all flash flood deaths happen in vehicles. When in your car, look out for flooding in low lying areas, at bridges, and at highway dips. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle.  Remember – turn around, don’t drown.
  • Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to walk in water, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.

Severe weather watches and warnings may happen quickly, so be familiar with flood terminology, like:

  • Flood Watch - Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information. 
  • Flood Warning - Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately. 
  • Flash Flood Watch - Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information. 
  • Flash Flood Warning - A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately. 

We encourage everyone to monitor weather conditions in your area as the weather can quickly change. Visit www.weather.gov on your computer or http://mobile.weather.gov on your mobile device.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it, last week our digital team launched a few new tools to help the public prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters.  Shayne Adamski, FEMA’s Senior Manager for Digital Engagement blogged about these new digital tools to help better connect people with the tools and resources you may need before, during and after a disaster. Here’s a short video from Administrator Fugate explaining how the new tools work:

It’s Almost National Preparedness Month

September is right around the corner, so you know what that means – it’s National Preparedness Month. The goal of National Preparedness Month is to encourage individuals, businesses, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations to learn about the local hazards in your community, make a family communication plan, build an emergency kit, then get involved in your local community preparedness efforts. And we’re doing just that, take some time this weekend to pledge to prepare your family and neighbors for emergencies by joining the National Preparedness Community!

As a Community Member, you’ll have access to exclusive resources and be able to collaborate with thousands of other members across the country on ways to participate and get your community involved.  There’s no cost in signing up and it’s a great first step in preparing your home and family from an emergency.

We hope you’ll join us and participate this September!

Photos of the Week

And to wrap things up, here are a few of our favorite photos of the week. For more photos visit our Photo Library.

construction men working on a boardwalkOrtley Beach, N.J., Aug. 5, 2013 -- Damages are still visible nine months after Hurricane Sandy touched the coast last fall as workers rebuild Ortley Beach's boardwalk.

Anniston, Ala., Aug. 1, 2013 -- Healthcare workers, representing 23 Native American tribes respond to an emergency at the Center for Domestic Prep...Anniston, Ala., Aug. 1, 2013 -- Healthcare workers, representing 23 Native American tribes respond to an emergency at the Center for Domestic Preparedness (CDP) Noble Training Facility. More than 50 tribal members, representing 10 states came together at the CDP for the Healthcare Leadership for Mass Casualty Incidents course. During the four-day class the tribal members trained to provide a realistic medical response in an actual treatment facility.

contractors assemble tubingHarvey Cedars, N.J., July 31, 2013 -- Pipes are assembled as part of the dredging operation is underway to replenish the beaches and the dunes of Long Beach Island after Hurricane Sandy eroded them last fall. The project is part of the Army Corps of Engineers' Flood and Coastal Damage Reduction Program, funded by the Sandy Relief Act.

Have a great and safe weekend!

Crowdsourcing Disasters and Social Engagement Multiplied

Crowdsourcing disasters. New social media sites. Centralized places to get info. Our digital team at FEMA has been busy launching a number of new tools to help the public and our partners to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. Here’s a quick rundown of the new resources:

  1. FEMA App with the Disaster Reporter feature
  2. FEMA’s Social Hub
  3. FEMA LinkedIn
  4. U.S. Fire Administration Facebook

How does this help you be a part of the emergency management team? Watch this demo from Administrator Fugate as he walks through all the new tools and resources you can take advantage of:

Before a disaster, you can download the FEMA App and use the interactive emergency kit checklist and learn what to do during specific hazards. And if you find yourself in a situation, where you need a refresher, you can still pull up the safety info in the app, even if you don’t have a cellular or wifi connection.

After a disaster, if you’re not placing yourself in harm’s way, you can use the Disaster Reporter feature in the FEMA App and take a photo of the disaster area and upload it to us (just make sure the GPS function is turned on).  This includes all types of disasters, not just Federal disasters.

We’ll review the photo submissions to ensure: (1) it is disaster-related, (2) not spam, and (3) there are no privacy issues.  And then all approved content is posted on a public map. It’s pretty simple.

We’re really excited about this new feature, because it gives all stakeholders in a disaster area the ability to upload information to a centralized place, allowing all emergency managers to view the information.  Since we’re using the FEMA GeoPlatform for our mapping interface the content can be shared on other maps and sites, using what techies refer to as an API (Application Programming Interface).

Speaking of centralized places to view information, the Social Hub is where all stakeholders can go to view tweets from trusted emergency managers.  The great thing about the Social Hub is we can change the information we’re displaying on the fly.  When we launched the Social Hub on Monday, July 29, we were displaying tweets from accounts in Hawaii, because we were monitoring Tropical Storm Flossie. 

When the storm dissipated, we transitioned to displaying local National Weather Service tweets, both in a scrolling format and on a map.  As we know, more and more people are going mobile with their devices (phones and tablets), so we also created a Social Hub on our mobile site.

Finally, we recently launched two new channels to better engage FEMA’s digital audience: the FEMA LinkedIn page and the U.S. Fire Administration Facebook page.  On LinkedIn, look for job listings, stories about what a “day in the life” looks like at FEMA, and other training resources.  And if you “Like” the U.S. Fire Administration Facebook page, you’ll receive lots of stories, resources, and tips for assisting fire departments or firefighters.

When I testified on Capitol Hill on Social Media and Emergency Management last month, I said that we’re always looking at how we can expand our existing digital and social products. As you can imagine, we’re excited about these new tools and we’re looking forward to feedback.

Kick the tires as they say and let us know what you think.

What We’re Watching: 8/2/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Photos of the Week

Here are a few of our favorite photos from the past week. Check out our Photo Library for more.

Moore, Okla., July 29, 2013 -- The American flag stands as a sign of strength in the foreground of the devastation left in the wake of the May 20th EF-5 tornado.Moore, Okla., July 29, 2013 -- The American flag stands as a sign of strength in the foreground of the devastation left in the wake of the May 20th EF-5 tornado.

Old Bridge, N.J., July 27, 2013 -- FEMA Mitigation specialist Jenai Jordan and External Affairs representative Susan Langhoff provide information on mitigating disasters like Hurricane Sandy at the Home Depot Hurricane Workshop in Old Bridge, New Jersey.Old Bridge, N.J., July 27, 2013 -- FEMA Mitigation specialist Jenai Jordan and External Affairs representative Susan Langhoff provide information on mitigating disasters like Hurricane Sandy at the Home Depot Hurricane Workshop in Old Bridge, New Jersey.

White River, Mich., July 30, 2013 -- Muskegon County Road Maintenance Superintendent Laurie Peterson, views this very dangerous road washout. FEMA Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation Grants become available following application and inspection and cover a significant portion of the cost of repair.White River, Mich., July 30, 2013 -- Muskegon County Road Maintenance Superintendent Laurie Peterson, views this very dangerous road washout. FEMA Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation Grants become available following application and inspection and cover a significant portion of the cost of repair.

Weather Outlook

According to the National Weather Service, it doesn’t appear there will be any severe weather threats this weekend.  While there aren’t any significant weather threats at this time, weather conditions can change rapidly. We encourage everyone to monitor their local weather conditions online at www.weather.gov or on their mobile device at http://mobile.weather.gov

While you’re out and about this weekend, take a few moments to make sure your family’s emergency kit is fully stocked as we head into the peak of hurricane season.  Last week we saw two Tropical Storms -- Dorian in the Caribbean and Flossie in the Pacific. These storms are great reminders that the time to prepare for tropical weather is now. Visit Ready.gov for a list of items that should be in your emergency kit and for safety tips on what to do before, during and after a hurricane.

Public-Private Partnership Conference

This week the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA, in association with the United States Northern Command and the American Red Cross, hosted the “Building Resilience through Public-Private Partnerships” conference. 

The conference highlighted successful public-private partnerships, identified coordination gaps between public-private organizations, and engaged both sectors to determine how to further promote teamwork to make our communities and nation more resilient.

Here are a few tweets from the @FEMALive account, which covered live the conference live on Twitter:

Thanks to everyone who was able to participate and follow the discussion online!

For more information on how FEMA engages with the Private Sector, visit www.fema.gov/private-sector.

Have a safe weekend!

What We’re Watching: 7/26/13

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At the end of each week, we post a "What We’re Watching" blog as we look ahead to the weekend and recap events from the week. We encourage you to share it with your friends and family, and have a safe weekend.

Tropical Storms Dorian & Flossie

We continue to closely watch both Tropical Storm Dorian in the Atlantic and Topical Storm Flossie in the Pacific.  Although at this time there are no watches and warnings in effect for either storms, we encourage residents in projected paths to take action now and prepare.  Tropical storms still present dangerous hazards such as winds over 70mph, tornadoes, heavy rain and flooding.  We urge everyone to closely monitor your local weather conditions and follow the instructions of local officials.  Make sure your emergency kit is fully stocked with the things your family may need.  Head over to Ready.gov on your computer or m.fema.gov/hurricanes on your phone for hurricane safety tips and information on tailoring your family’s emergency kit.

We will continue to provide updates on both storms as necessary, especially through our Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Public-Private Partnership Conference

As part of our continued efforts to better engage with the private sector, the Department of Homeland Security, in partnership with FEMA, U.S. Northern Command and American Red Cross, are hosting the Third Annual Building Resilience through Public-Private Partnerships Conference next week on July 30-31, 2013. 

The conference attracts participants from the public and private sectors to promote innovation in furthering public-private partnerships to make our neighborhoods and country more resilient.  We’ll be live tweeting from @FEMALive during the conference, so if you’re on Twitter you can follow the conversation by using #PPPconf

Visit FEMA’s Private Sector page for more information on the conference and how we engage our private sector partners.

Photos of the Week

Here’s a few of my favorite photos from the past week. For more photos, head over to our Photo Library.

Union Beach, N.J., July 24, 2013 -- A King Street United Brethren Church volunteer prepares the substructure of a storm battered home before installing insulation. This is a coordinated effort from various non-profit organizations to aid homeowners to rebuild their damaged homes after Hurricane Sandy. Union Beach, N.J., July 24, 2013 -- A King Street United Brethren Church volunteer prepares the substructure of a storm battered home before installing insulation. This is a coordinated effort from various non-profit organizations to aid homeowners to rebuild their damaged homes after Hurricane Sandy.

 

Lyons, Mich., July 25, 2013 --Susan Craft, DPW Maintenance Superintendent, points out to FEMA Project Specialist Ron Hamilton how the bridge is endangered by the loss of riprap during the flooding of the river. FEMA Public Assistance Grants are available following application and inspection, to cover at least 75% of the cost of repair.Lyons, Mich., July 25, 2013 -- Susan Craft, DPW Maintenance Superintendent, points out to FEMA Project Specialist Ron Hamilton how the bridge is endangered by the loss of riprap during the flooding of the river. FEMA Public Assistance Grants are available following application and inspection, to cover at least 75% of the cost of repair.

Have a great (and safe) weekend!

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