U.S. flag

Một trang web chính thức của Chính Phủ Hoa Kỳ

Dot gov

Phần mở rộng .gov nghĩa là đây là trang web chính thức.

Các trang web của chính phủ liên bang thường kết thúc bằng .gov hoặc .mil. Trước khi chia sẻ thông tin nhạy cảm, hãy chắc chắn rằng quý vị đang truy cập trang web của chính phủ liên bang.

Https

Trang mạng này được bảo vệ.

Phần https:// đảm bảo rằng quý vị đang kết nối với trang web chính thức và mọi thông tin quý vị cung cấp đều được mã hóa và truyền tải an toàn.

alert - warning

Trang này chưa được dịch sang tiếng Tiếng Việt. Truy cập trang được dịch sang tiếng Tiếng Việt để xem các tài nguyên hỗ trợ theo ngôn ngữ này.

Disaster Authorities

There are many different authorities that define how FEMA responds to disasters. In this section, you can find information about how each of these authorities affect the agency’s operations.

alert - info

Visit our Guidance Documents page for more information on how we administer statutory and regulatory authorities.

Learn About Disaster Authorities

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act constitutes the statutory authority for most federal disaster response activities and established the presidential disaster declaration process.

The Defense Production Act is the primary source of presidential authorities to expedite and expand the supply of materials and services from the U.S. industrial base needed to promote the national defense. DPA authorities may support emergency activities related to the Stafford Act, and may also protect or restore critical infrastructure.  

On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina became the most devastating natural disaster in U.S. history. As a result, President George W. Bush signed into law the Post-Katrina Emergency Reform Act on Oct. 4, 2006. The act significantly reorganized FEMA and provided it new authority to remedy gaps that became apparent in Hurricane Katrina response efforts.

Following Hurricane Sandy’s Oct. 24, 2012 landfall, the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 authorizes several significant changes to the way FEMA may deliver federal disaster assistance to survivors.

Following the devastating hurricane and wildfire season of 2017, the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 brought about reforms that acknowledge the shared responsibility for disaster response and recovery, aim to reduce the complexity of FEMA, and build the nation’s capacity for the next catastrophic event.