https://www.fema.gov/ en 2 Weeks Left to Apply for Disaster Individual Assistance https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221123/2-weeks-left-apply-disaster-individual-assistance <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">2 Weeks Left to Apply for Disaster Individual Assistance</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Anchorage, Alaska –</strong> Residents of the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon have <strong>until Dec. 6</strong> to apply for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and State of Alaska disaster assistance. To receive disaster Individual Assistance, you must apply before the deadline.</p> <p>Make sure you register with both FEMA and the State of Alaska to be eligible for Individual Assistance.</p> <ul><li><strong>FEMA Hotline: <a href="tel:%208006213362">1-800-621-336</a></strong><a href="tel:%208006213362"><strong>2</strong></a> (Monday through Friday, 9 AM – 6 PM AKT.) <ul><li> <ul><li>FEMA Hotline TTY users can dial 711 or, TTY users with an out-of-state area code, dial <strong>800-770-8973</strong> for Alaska relay service.</li> </ul></li> </ul></li> <li><strong>State of Alaska Hotline</strong><strong>: </strong><strong>1-844-445-7131 </strong>(Monday through Friday 8 AM – 4 PM AKT.)</li> </ul><p><strong><u>Don’t forget – the hotline is a helpline! Call to apply, get help with an existing application, or have your questions answered. </u></strong></p> <p>There are other ways you can apply for disaster assistance:<strong> </strong></p> <ul><li>Applications for <strong>FEMA Individual Assistance </strong>can also be submitted at <a href="http://www.disasterassistance.gov">www.disasterassistance.gov</a> or via the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/news-multimedia/mobile-products">FEMA mobile app.</a></li> <li>To apply for <strong>State of Alaska Individual Assistance</strong> survivors can go online to <a href="http://www.ready.alaska.gov/IA">ready.alaska.gov/IA</a>.</li> </ul><p>Residents who applied for disaster assistance from FEMA may be referred to SBA to apply for a low-interest disaster loan as the next step in the application process. Long-term, low-interest disaster loans for businesses, nonprofits, homeowners and renters may be available to cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other sources. <strong>You are not required to take out a loan, but failure to fill out the application may prevent you from receiving certain types of FEMA funding.</strong><strong> </strong></p> <ul><li>Applicants may apply for SBA, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at <a href="https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/">https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/</a>. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at <strong>(800) 659-2955</strong> or email <a href="mailto:disastercustomerservice@sba.gov">disastercustomerservice@sba.gov</a> for more information on SBA disaster assistance. For people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, please dial 7-1-1 to access telecommunications relay services.</li> </ul><p>###</p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em> </p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters. </em></p> <p><em>FEMA is committed to providing equal access to our programs and services without discrimination. If you require a reasonable accommodation, call or text 907-727-6221 or email <a href="mailto:FEMA-language-access-request@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-language-access-request@fema.dhs.gov</a>. You can also let staff know you require an accommodation such as spoken language resources, mobility assistance, or sign language interpreting services. If you feel you have experienced discrimination, call the FEMA Civil Rights Resource line at 833-285-7448 or 800-462-7585 (TTY/TDD) or email: <a href="mailto:FEMACivilRightsOffice@fema.dhs.gov">FEMACivilRightsOffice@fema.dhs.gov</a>.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 11/23/2022 - 00:47</span> Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:47:18 +0000 mary.j.edmon 646186 at https://www.fema.gov Flood Insurance is a Valuable Resource https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221101/flood-insurance-valuable-resource <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Flood Insurance is a Valuable Resource</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Anchorage, Alaska </strong>–If you experienced damage from recent severe storms, flooding and landslides, flood insurance may be an option to prepare for future storms.</p> <p>Floods are the most common and expensive natural disaster in the U.S. One inch of floodwater can cause up to <strong>$25,000</strong> of damage in a home. Unfortunately, most homeowners insurance does NOT cover flooding. Usually, the only way for homeowners, renters and businesses to be protected from the costs of flooding is with a policy from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is managed by the federal government and administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).</p> <p>Homeowners and business owners are eligible to purchase flood insurance if their community is among the more than 20,000 communities participating in the NFIP. These include cities, boroughs, counties and other jurisdictions that manage development. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce floodplain management ordinances to reduce future flood damage. You don’t need to live in a floodplain to purchase a policy. Areas outside of the mapped floodplain are also subject to flooding and an NFIP policy can provide coverage.</p> <p>Policy rates are determined by many risk factors unique to your structure such as the type of foundation that your structure is built on, the distance to the nearest flooding source, the elevation of the structure above the ground and the amount of coverage needed. The average annual cost of a flood insurance policy in Alaska is <strong>$593 per year</strong>. That comes out to around <strong>$50 per month</strong>. Even if your home is not in a designated high-risk area, it can still be flooded. Keep in mind, as many as one-fourth of all NFIP claims come from areas NOT designated as high risk.</p> <p>The maximum coverage available for a residential building is <strong>$250,000</strong> and <strong>$100,000</strong> for contents. Non-residential, or commercial structures are eligible for maximum coverage of <strong>$500,000</strong> on the building and<strong> $500,000</strong> on contents. </p> <p>Flood insurance coverage is available in participating communities regardless of federal disaster declarations. To find out if your community participates in the NFIP visit the FEMA Community Status Book at <a href="https://www.fema.gov/cis/AK.html">https://www.fema.gov/cis/AK.html</a>. There is a 30-day waiting period before new policies go into effect, so don't wait to obtain a policy.</p> <p>For additional information and to purchase an NFIP policy, contact your insurance agent today. Find out more about your risk and flood insurance at <a href="https://www.floodsmart.gov/">https://www.floodsmart.gov/</a>. To purchase flood insurance or find an agent, call <strong>1-800-427-4661.</strong></p> <p>###</p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 11/01/2022 - 23:01</span> Tue, 01 Nov 2022 23:01:38 +0000 mary.j.edmon 645282 at https://www.fema.gov Purchase Flood Insurance to Protect What You’ve Built https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221027/purchase-flood-insurance-protect-what-youve-built <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Purchase Flood Insurance to Protect What You’ve Built</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – If you do not carry National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) insurance, now is the time to buy it. Wildfire season is slowing down, and once the fires are out, people and communities are at risk for another threat, flooding.  Wildfires leave the ground charred and unable to absorb water. This creates a flash flooding potential for years to come, even in areas that rarely experienced flooding in the past. Sometimes these flash floods can pick up ash and large debris, turning into mudflows that are highly destructive.</p> <p>Unlike many causes of damage, flooding and mudflows are generally not covered by a homeowners’ policy. An uninsured flood loss can eat into your life’s savings. Floods are the most common and expensive natural disaster in the U.S.  Just an inch of water in an average-sized home can cause $25,000 in damage. A NFIP policy protects against such losses and can ensure that a flood doesn’t bring financial ruin.</p> <p>Flood insurance is easy to get, the only requirement is that you live in an NFIP participating community. These include cities, counties and other jurisdictions that manage development. You don’t need to live in a floodplain to purchase a policy. If you live outside a floodplain, insurance will likely cost less than for those living in a higher risk area.</p> <p>Buyers should be aware of the 30-day waiting period for an NFIP policy to go into effect. It is important to purchase a policy now to protect your property against the continuing threat of flooding. You can usually purchase flood insurance from your current agent. If that isn’t possible, NFIP representatives can help you find one.</p> <p>As with any insurance, be sure to talk with your agent about the specifics of your policy. Find out more about your risk and flood insurance at <a href="www.floodsmart.gov">www.floodsmart.gov</a>. To purchase flood insurance or find an agent, call 1-800-427-4661.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 10/27/2022 - 17:52</span> Thu, 27 Oct 2022 17:52:00 +0000 mary.j.edmon 645074 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Provides More than $3.2 million to Alaska Communities Affected by September West Coast Storms https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221021/fema-provides-more-32-million-alaska-communities-affected-september-west <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Provides More than $3.2 million to Alaska Communities Affected by September West Coast Storms</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Nearly a month after a federal disaster declaration was made for the severe storm, flooding and landslides that occurred in Western Alaska from Sept. 15 – 20, <strong>more than $3 million in federal disaster assistance</strong> has been awarded to survivors. Those in the designated Regional Educational Attendance Areas (REAAs) of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon are eligible to apply for FEMA assistance until Nov. 22.</p> <p>As of Oct. 21, FEMA has received a total of <strong>773 applications</strong>.</p> <ul><li>More than <strong>$1.1 million</strong> has been disbursed for housing assistance, which may include rental expenses, basic home repairs, or other essential disaster-related needs that are not covered by insurance.</li> <li>More than <strong>$2.1 million</strong> has been disbursed for Other Needs Assistance, which can include coverage for damaged personal property, such as household appliances, furniture and, in Alaska, subsistence equipment and tools, such as fishing equipment, cold weather gear, ATVs, boats, outboard motors, smoke house and snow mobiles. </li> </ul><p>FEMA is including a shipping supplement of<strong> $1,300</strong> to help cover the additional cost of transporting repair materials and supplies for eligible survivors. So far, a total of <strong>$143,236</strong> has been provided to <strong>104 households</strong>. Applicants should keep track of their shipping receipts. If they have additional shipping expenses for repair materials over <strong>$1,300</strong>, they are encouraged to submit receipts to FEMA for potential reimbursement. Survivors who have questions about their eligibility for the additional shipping cost can contact FEMA for more information.</p> <p>FEMA has established an Alaska-specific disaster hotline staffed in Anchorage to process applications and answer questions. The number is <strong>1-866-342-1699.</strong> Beginning Monday, Oct. 24, hours of operation will be <strong>9. a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Saturday and closed on Sundays</strong> (current hours are 10 AM – 8 PM Monday through Saturday.) TTY users dial 711 or, TTY users with an out-of-state area code, dial <strong>800-770-8973</strong> for Alaska relay service. Applications can also be submitted at <a href="http://www.disasterassistance.gov">www.disasterassistance.gov</a> or via the FEMA app.</p> <p>The State of Alaska also provides disaster assistance that is separate from FEMA’s. In order to receive potential aid from the state, survivors must register with FEMA. If you are found ineligible for FEMA assistance, you may qualify for assistance through the State of Alaska. For example, FEMA may be able to cover damaged subsistence equipment</p> <p>and tools while the state may pay for the damaged structure. If you don’t submit both applications, it is possible no assistance will be available to you.</p> <p>Survivors can apply for disaster assistance from the State of Alaska by calling <strong>1-844-445-7131</strong> or going online at  <a href="https://ready.alaska.gov/IA">ready.alaska.gov/IA</a><u>. The deadline for apply to the state is <strong>Nov. 17, 2022.</strong></u></p> <p>Some applicants may be referred to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to apply for a disaster loan. Long-term, low-interest disaster loans for homeowners, renters, businesses and nonprofits may be available to cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other sources.</p> <p>Homeowners and renters should submit an SBA disaster loan application even if they are not sure they will need or want a loan. If SBA cannot approve your application, in most cases SBA will refer you to FEMA’s Other Needs Assistance program for possible additional assistance. If your application is approved, you are not obligated to accept an SBA loan but failure to return the application may disqualify you from other possible FEMA assistance.</p> <p>Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via the SBA’s secure website at <a href="https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela/s/">disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ela</a>. Paper applications may be requested by calling the SBA Customer Service Center at<strong> 800-659-2955</strong> (dial 711 for TTY) or by sending an e-mail to <a href="mailto:disastercustomerservice@sba.gov">disastercustomerservice@sba.gov</a>. The deadline to apply is <strong>Nov. 22, 2022</strong></p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>thomas.wise</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 10/21/2022 - 20:30</span> Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:30:12 +0000 thomas.wise 644826 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Updates Operating Hours for the Alaska Disaster Assistance Hotline https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221020/fema-updates-operating-hours-alaska-disaster-assistance-hotline <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Updates Operating Hours for the Alaska Disaster Assistance Hotline</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>FEMA has updated the operating hours for the Alaska-specific Disaster Assistance Hotline. Residents in the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon who experienced damage or loss from September’s severe storm, flooding and landslides can call the hotline to apply for FEMA assistance or receive help with an application.</p> <p>Starting <strong>Monday, Oct. 24</strong>, the Anchorage-based FEMA hotline will operate from <strong>9 a.m. to 6 p.m.</strong>, Monday through Saturday and will be <strong>closed</strong> on Sundays.</p> <p>Applicants can apply for FEMA disaster assistance by:</p> <ul><li>Calling <strong>1-866-342-1699</strong> for the FEMA Alaska-specific disaster hotline. For TTY users, dial 711. For TTY users with an out-of-state area code, dial<strong> 1-800-770-8973</strong> for Alaska Relay.</li> <li>Going online to <strong>disasterassistance.gov.</strong></li> <li>Downloading and applying through the FEMA mobile app.</li> </ul><p>The deadline to apply for FEMA assistance is <strong>Nov. 22, 2022.</strong></p> <p>FEMA’s Individual Assistance program may include grants for temporary housing expenses, basic home repairs, or other essential disaster-related needs that are not covered by insurance. In Alaska, subsistence items lost or damaged from the September storms may be eligible for assistance.  </p> <p>The State of Alaska also has an Individual Assistance program, which has a separate application process from FEMA’s. <strong>It is important that survivors apply for both FEMA and the State of Alaska’s disaster assistance programs.</strong></p> <p>If you are found ineligible for federal assistance, you may still qualify for assistance through the State of Alaska, but if you do not submit both applications it is possible that no assistance will be available to you.</p> <ul><li>Survivors can apply for state assistance online at <a href="https://usfema.sharepoint.com/teams/R10ORAEXA/EA_Projects/Projects/2022%20-%20DR-4672-AK%20ESF15/ready.alaska.gov/IA">ready.alaska.gov/IA</a> or by calling <strong>844-445-7131.</strong> The deadline to apply for State of Alaska assistance is <strong>Nov. 17, 2022.</strong></li> </ul><p>Some applicants may be referred to the <strong>U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)</strong> to apply for a disaster loan. Long-term, low-interest disaster loans for businesses, nonprofits, homeowners and renters may be available to cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other sources. Homeowners and renters should submit an SBA disaster loan application even if they are not sure they will need or want a loan.</p> <p>Applicants may apply in the following ways:</p> <ul><li>Go online at: <a href="https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/">https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/</a></li> <li>Call <strong>1-(800) 659-2955,</strong> for TTY users please dial 711.</li> <li>Email <a href="mailto:disastercustomerservice@sba.gov">disastercustomerservice@sba.gov</a> for more information on SBA disaster assistance.</li> </ul><p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>thomas.wise</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 10/20/2022 - 18:45</span> Thu, 20 Oct 2022 18:45:12 +0000 thomas.wise 644766 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Nakia Creek Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221017/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-nakia-creek-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Nakia Creek Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>BOTHELL, Wash. - The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Nakia Creek Fire burning in Clark and Skamania Counties in Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Sunday, October 16, 2022, at 10:21 p.m. PT. He determined that the Nakia Creek Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the third FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Washington wildfires. </p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Camas and Hokinson. The fire also threatened Larch Correctional Center, state timber, manufacturing facilities, agricultural facilities, electrical transmission and distribution lines, recreational facilities, and fuel pipelines in the area. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. </p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $1,048,736 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.  </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>luther.wills-dudich</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/17/2022 - 17:13</span> Mon, 17 Oct 2022 17:13:39 +0000 luther.wills-dudich 644631 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Establishes Disaster Hotline for Alaska Survivors https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20221008/fema-establishes-disaster-hotline-alaska-survivors <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Establishes Disaster Hotline for Alaska Survivors</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>FEMA has established a <strong>new Alaska-specific Disaster Assistance Hotline</strong> for residents in the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon who experienced damage or loss from September’s severe storm, flooding and landslides.</p> <p>Those affected by the storms can <strong>apply for FEMA disaster assistance</strong> in the following ways:</p> <ul><li>Call <strong>1-866-342-1699, </strong>the Anchorage-based FEMA hotline will be operable from <strong>10 a.m. to 8 p.m.</strong>, Monday through Saturday and from <strong>12 p.m. to 6 p.m</strong>.on Sunday, Oct. 9 and Oct. 16</li> <li>Dial 711 for TTY users. For TTY users with an out-of-state area code, dial <strong>1-800-770-8973</strong> for Alaska Relay.</li> <li>Go online at <a href="disasterassistance.gov">disasterassistance.gov</a><u>.</u></li> <li>Download the FEMA app.</li> </ul><p>The hotline will provide survivors with shorter wait times and be staffed by case workers who can register survivors for FEMA assistance as well as answer any follow-up questions.</p> <p>The deadline to apply for FEMA assistance is <strong>Nov. 22, 2022.</strong></p> <p>FEMA’s Individual Assistance program may include grants for temporary housing expenses, basic home repairs, or other essential disaster-related needs that are not covered by insurance. In Alaska, subsistence items lost or damaged from the September storms may be eligible for assistance.  </p> <p>The State of Alaska also has an Individual Assistance program, which has a separate application process from FEMA’s. <strong>It is important that survivors apply for both FEMA and the State of Alaska’s disaster assistance programs.</strong></p> <p>If you are found ineligible for federal assistance, you may still qualify for assistance through the State of Alaska, but if you do not submit both applications it is possible that no assistance will be available to you.</p> <ul><li>Survivors can apply for state assistance online at <a href="https://usfema.sharepoint.com/teams/R10ORAEXA/EA_Projects/Projects/2022%20-%20DR-4672-AK%20ESF15/ready.alaska.gov/IA">ready.alaska.gov/IA</a> or by calling <strong>844-445-7131.</strong> The deadline to apply for State of Alaska assistance is <strong>Nov. 17, 2022.</strong></li> </ul><p>Some applicants may be referred to the <strong>U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)</strong> to apply for a disaster loan. Long-term, low-interest disaster loans for businesses, nonprofits, homeowners and renters may be available to cover</p> <p>losses not fully compensated by insurance or other sources. Homeowners and renters should submit an SBA disaster loan application even if they are not sure they will need or want a loan.</p> <p>Applicants may apply in the following ways:</p> <ul><li>Go online at: <a href="https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/">https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/ </a>.</li> <li>Call <strong>1-(800) 659-2955,</strong> for TTY users please dial 711.</li> <li>Email <a href="mailto:disastercustomerservice@sba.gov">disastercustomerservice@sba.gov</a> for more information on SBA disaster assistance.</li> </ul><p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>thomas.wise</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 10/08/2022 - 18:45</span> Sat, 08 Oct 2022 18:45:12 +0000 thomas.wise 644302 at https://www.fema.gov President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Amends Federal Cost-Share for Alaska https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220929/president-joseph-r-biden-jr-amends-federal-cost-share-alaska <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Amends Federal Cost-Share for Alaska </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON -- FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell announced today that President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. made additional disaster assistance available to the state of Alaska to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by a severe storm, flooding and landslides from Sept. 15-20, 2022.</p> <p>The President authorized the federal cost-share for emergency protective measures to be increased from 75% to 100% for the first 30 days of the incident period. In the major <a href="https://u7061146.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn=4tNED-2FM8iDZJQyQ53jATUagBDM4sL1shLOp6353S1yxgdtCOCia6Mdy3nlRSQOQB8fbi_GQY5Hu5ygKE2XonwuN9LVzUgNXGyGWD9w-2FT01ODoNpVsPwJtdU0MjmKSs-2FXxBZLrDWxyTYyFTFFFFH-2B-2BWwpuBrGJjJyRv6ZCKZBYW9GqquARLC-2B1zz9mCYKXFKGJD9QrAOypJzGxkUTGEpDc69H4pup-2BmHi8ccqG-2B8ECMzlEtPTfbjbD-2BjjqTaT6JQfEYDwYuJeINgEYe7FpQzKCUwPv12M5fOx-2F6CgwbbnYIO3Jmb5KbFutLbUfbYChzbo1QqqBhSDoRMhWnudhaQpNr-2FyrCvVZRrvtvQ9VYjPlzA7wkq1ouHskZHPXOElNUz32MxkFMWhHO-2B9E3iP26OFWlJY12NaUWZctWPmxigjJXzGmefc-3D">disaster declaration issued</a> for the state of Alaska, federal funding was made available for public assistance, the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program and other needs assistance for total eligible costs.         </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 09/29/2022 - 22:35</span> Thu, 29 Sep 2022 22:35:58 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 643002 at https://www.fema.gov How To Apply for Federal and State Individual Assistance https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220928/how-apply-federal-and-state-individual-assistance <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How To Apply for Federal and State Individual Assistance</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>ANCHORAGE, Alaska</strong>– Residents of the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon who suffered property damage or loss from September’s severe storm, flooding and landslides are now eligible to apply for disaster assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the State of Alaska. Available aid includes temporary housing expenses, basic home repairs, or other essential disaster-related needs that are not covered by insurance.</p> <p>The State of Alaska and FEMA’s Individual Assistance (IA) programs are separate, and each have their own application process. However, it is important that survivors apply for both FEMA and Alaska’s IA programs. If a survivor is found ineligible for federal assistance, they may qualify for assistance through the State of Alaska, but applications must be submitted for both.</p> <h3>State of Alaska Individual Assistance</h3> <p>The state’s IA program has two elements that may help with disaster-related expenses. The Individuals and Family Grant program can provide grant funding to survivors with damage to their homes, personal property, transportation, or medical/dental expenses. The Temporary Housing program can provide rental assistance to those with unlivable homes damaged by September’s severe storm.</p> <p>The deadline to apply for Alaska’s IA program is <strong>Nov. 17, 2022.</strong> Survivors can apply for state assistance online at <a href="http://ready.alaska.gov/IA">ready.alaska.gov/IA</a>, or by calling the Disaster Assistance Hotline at 1-844-445-7131.</p> <h3>What is the FEMA Individuals and Households Program?</h3> <p>FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program (IHP) provides financial and direct services to eligible survivors who have disaster-related uninsured or underinsured necessary expenses and immediate needs. IHP is not a substitute for insurance and assistance is intended to meet the basic needs of the household, not to restore the home and contents to a pre-disaster condition. IHP can be divided into two categories: Housing Assistance (HA) and Other Needs Assistance (ONA).</p> <p><strong>Housing Assistance </strong>covers<strong> </strong>repairs to structural parts of a home including windows, doors, floors, walls, ceilings, cabinets, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system, utilities (electrical, plumbing and gas systems), and entrance and exit ways from the home.</p> <p>FEMA may also pay up to the actual cost of the receipt or estimate for furnaces, wells and septic systems. If survivors have already repaired or replaced these systems, they may be able to submit valid receipts or estimates to see if they qualify for FEMA assistance.</p> <p><strong>Other Needs Assistance</strong> provides grants to survivors for uninsured, disaster-related expenses and needs. This assistance can include medical and dental expenses; funeral and burial costs; clothing; household items; specialized tools; subsistence equipment and supplies, educational materials; vehicles; and moving, storage or other necessary expenses related to the disaster.</p> <p>The deadline to apply for FEMA Individual Assistance is <strong>Nov. 22, 2022.</strong> Residents in the designated areas can apply online at <a href="https://www.disasterassistance.gov">disasterassistance.gov</a>, by calling 800-621-3362, or by using the FEMA mobile app. When calling, Press 1 for English, 2 for Spanish and 3 for all other languages. Those who use a relay service such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, can give the FEMA operator the number for that service. Phone lines operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. AKDT seven days a week.  </p> <p>For an accessible video on how to apply for FEMA assistance, visit <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw">youtube.com/watch?v=WZGpWI2RCNw</a>.</p> <h3>Small Business Administration</h3> <p>Some applicants may be referred to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to apply for a disaster loan. Long-term, low-interest disaster loans for homeowners, renters, businesses and nonprofits may be available to cover losses not fully compensated by insurance or other sources.</p> <p>Homeowners and renters should submit an SBA disaster loan application even if they are not sure they will need or want a loan. If SBA cannot approve the application, in most cases SBA will refer survivors to FEMA’s Other Needs Assistance program for possible additional assistance. If the application is approved, individuals are not obligated to accept an SBA loan but failure to return the application may disqualify them from other possible FEMA assistance.</p> <p>Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at <a href="https://disasterloanassistance.sba.gov/">disasterloanassistance.sba.gov</a>. Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 or email <a href="mailto:disastercustomerservice@sba.gov">disastercustomerservice@sba.gov</a>for more information on SBA disaster assistance. For people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, please dial 7-1-1 to access telecommunications relay services. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.</p> <p>###</p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s support to Alaska’s severe storms, flooding and landslide recovery, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4672">FEMA Disaster Site</a>. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates.<em> </em></p> <p> </p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/28/2022 - 22:48</span> Wed, 28 Sep 2022 22:48:43 +0000 mary.j.edmon 642949 at https://www.fema.gov President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Major Disaster Declaration for Alaska https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220924/president-joseph-r-biden-jr-approves-major-disaster-declaration-alaska <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Major Disaster Declaration for Alaska </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON ­-- FEMA announced today that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the state of Alaska to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by a severe storm, flooding and landslides from Sept. 15-20.</p> <p>The President’s action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon.</p> <p>Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-interest loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.</p> <p>Residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated areas can begin applying for assistance <a href="https://www.disasterassistance.gov/">www.DisasterAssistance.gov</a>, by calling 800-621-FEMA (3362) or by using the <a href="/about/news-multimedia/mobile-products#download">FEMA App</a>. Anyone using a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, can give FEMA the number for that service. </p> <p>Federal funding also is available to state, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures in the Regional Educational Attendance Areas of Bering Strait, Kashunamiut, Lower Kuskokwim and Lower Yukon.</p> <p>Federal funding is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.</p> <p>Timothy Manner has been named the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected areas. Additional designations may be made at a later date.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>zella.campbell</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 09/24/2022 - 14:37</span> Sat, 24 Sep 2022 14:37:11 +0000 zella.campbell 642776 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bolt Creek Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220911/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-bolt-creek-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bolt Creek Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>BOTHELL, Wash. - The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Bolt Creek Fire burning in King and Snohomish Counties in Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Saturday, September 10, 2022, at 9:48 p.m. PT. He determined that the Bolt Creek Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the second FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Washington wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Skykomish, Baring, Grotto, and Index. The fire also threatened transmission lines, telecommunications infrastructure, powerlines, railway line, cultural resources, roads, and bridges.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $1,048,736 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 09/11/2022 - 17:21</span> Sun, 11 Sep 2022 17:21:24 +0000 mary.j.edmon 641581 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight the Milo McIver Fire in Oregon https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220911/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-milo-mciver-fire-oregon <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight the Milo McIver Fire in Oregon</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>BOTHELL, Wash. - The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Milo McIver Fire burning in Clackamas County, Oregon.</p> <p>The state of Oregon’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Saturday, September 10, 2022, at 5:05 p.m. PT. He determined that the Milo McIver Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the second FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Oregon wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Estacada and Springwater. The fire also threatened Milo McIver State Park, commercial businesses, Estacada water and sewer plant, five dams, fish hatcheries, Bonneville Power Authority transmission lines, and the Valley View airport.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $786,552 will be available to Oregon through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 09/11/2022 - 17:12</span> Sun, 11 Sep 2022 17:12:47 +0000 mary.j.edmon 641580 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Ross Fork Fire in Idaho https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220907/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-ross-fork-fire-idaho <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Ross Fork Fire in Idaho</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Ross Fork Fire burning in Blaine County, Idaho.</p> <p>The state of Idaho’s request for a federal Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Tuesday, Sept. 6, at 4:09 p.m. PT. He determined that the Ross Fork Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the second FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Idaho wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Smiley Creek, Beaver Creek, and Cabin Creek. The fire also threatened two communication towers, the Smiley Creek Airport, four religious camps, and the fire station in the area.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $786,552 will be available to Idaho through the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide HMGP Post-Fire funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/07/2022 - 16:29</span> Wed, 07 Sep 2022 16:29:32 +0000 mary.j.edmon 641008 at https://www.fema.gov President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Disaster Declaration for Alaska https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220826/president-joseph-r-biden-jr-approves-disaster-declaration-alaska <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Disaster Declaration for Alaska</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON -- FEMA announced today that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the state of Alaska to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by flooding from May 8-11, 2022.</p> <p>Federal funding is available to state, tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by flooding in the Copper River Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA), Iditarod REAA and Kuspuk REAA.</p> <p>Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.</p> <p>Yolanda J. Jackson has been named the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected areas. Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further assessments.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/26/2022 - 21:46</span> Fri, 26 Aug 2022 21:46:29 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 640295 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Four Corners Fire in Idaho https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220819/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-four-corners-fire-idaho <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Four Corners Fire in Idaho</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Four Corners Fire burning in Idaho. </p> <p>The state of Idaho’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Friday, August 19, 2022, at 2:02 a.m. PT. He determined that the Four Corners Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the first FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Idaho wildfires. </p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of French Creek, Gods Acres, and Campbell Creek south to Raspberry Road, near the City of Cascade. The fire also threatened privately owned power lines, municipal water pumps, a privately owned church camp, and a federally owned radio repeater in the area. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. </p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $786,522 will be available to Idaho through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.  </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/19/2022 - 18:16</span> Fri, 19 Aug 2022 18:16:34 +0000 mary.j.edmon 639730 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA, State Emergency Management and Local Leaders Announce Historic Investments in Climate and Disaster Resilience https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220813/fema-state-emergency-management-and-local-leaders-announce-historic <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA, State Emergency Management and Local Leaders Announce Historic Investments in Climate and Disaster Resilience</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  Today, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Wille G. Nunn joined Washington Emergency Management Division Director Robert Ezelle and local leaders in Aberdeen, WA, to announce Washington projects selected as part of President Biden’s historic $1.16 billion climate and disaster resilience investment and the availability of an additional $3.095 billion in funding opportunities for communities in Fiscal Year 2022. The event took place near the location of the planned $50 million North Shore Levee project which was selected and would provide critical flood protection for residents and businesses across Aberdeen and Hoquiam.</p> <p>“As we speak, we are seeing the impacts of climate change as fires rage across the country, and unprecedented floods have claimed dozens of lives. Here in Region 10, we also can’t forget that every day is earthquake season with a deadly earthquake able to strike without warning,” said Regional Administrator Nunn. “The projects selected as well as the additional funding being made available empower local communities to develop innovative solutions that address the unique risks their communities face and promote a more secure, resilient and prosperous future for their residents. We’re proud to work side-by-side with our local leaders to help them take advantage of these funding opportunities.” A full video of today’s press conference can be found <a href="https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/15NInQTMZEFjNfZ_4k-KT-7nNY6UjuTde">here</a>.</p> <p>Funding for projects selected in Washington state form part of the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) grant program. BRIC provides communities with the opportunity to proactively invest in hazard mitigation projects to reduce the risks they face from disasters and natural hazards and avoid future disaster costs. Projects in Washington range from infrastructure investments that better ensure access to clean water and emergency communications in the event of an earthquake to initiatives to better prepare growing communities and economic hubs from flooding or seismic risks.</p> <p>The following projects were selected in Washington:</p> <ul><li><strong>City of Shoreline</strong>, North 175th Street Soil Stabilization Project - $8,869,500.00  </li> <li><strong>King County Water District 90</strong>, 2021 Relocate Wells &amp; WTP, Complete intertie for Emergency Water - $2,166,295.50  </li> <li><strong>City of Aberdeen</strong>, North Shore Levee - $50,000,000.00  </li> <li><strong>City of Auburn</strong>, City of Auburn Reservoir 2 Seismic Control Valve project - $1,087,500.00  </li> <li><strong>Seattle Police Department</strong>, City of Seattle Good Shepherd Center South Annex Seismic Retrofit - $380,517.58  </li> </ul><p>Last year, President Biden announced an increase in BRIC funding from $500 million to $1 billion with Fiscal Year 2022 funding set to double again to more than $2 billion. Today, the administration announced that a total of $3.095 billion in new funding opportunities would be available for communities as part of the BRIC program and the Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) program, which provides funding to states, local communities, federally recognized tribes, and territories to reduce or eliminate the risk of repetitive flood damage to buildings insured by the National Flood Insurance program. Funding was also included for technical assistance for local communities to build capacity and capability to be able to undertake these projects.</p> <p>The current round of applications received far more applicants than funding available, representing the intense demand for climate resilience and disaster mitigation funding. Projects selected will undergo further review before receiving funds. Summaries and additional information on subapplicants can be found on <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/building-resilient-infrastructure-communities/after-apply/fy-2021-subapplication-status/selections">FEMA.gov</a>.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 08/13/2022 - 00:11</span> Sat, 13 Aug 2022 00:11:46 +0000 mary.j.edmon 639167 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Lind Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220805/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-lind-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Lind Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Lind Fire burning in Washington. </p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Thursday, August 4, 2022, at 5:58 p.m. PT. He determined that the Lind Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the first FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Washington wildfires. </p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the community of Lind. The fire also threatened critical communications infrastructure, well-water access, a railway along US 395, two public schools, and the Lind Municipal Airport. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. </p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $1,048,736 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.  </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/05/2022 - 17:53</span> Fri, 05 Aug 2022 17:53:37 +0000 mary.j.edmon 638910 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Miller Road Fire in Oregon https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220803/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-miller-road-fire-oregon <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Miller Road Fire in Oregon</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Miller Road Fire burning in Oregon. </p> <p>The state of Oregon’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Deputy Administrator Vince Maykovich on Wednesday, August 3, 2022, at 12:11 a.m. PT. He determined that the Miller Road Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the first FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Oregon wildfires. </p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Pine Grove, Tygh Valley, and the City of Maupin. The fire also threatened a major power transmission line and three communications towers in the area. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. </p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $786,552 will be available to Oregon through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.  </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/03/2022 - 18:07</span> Wed, 03 Aug 2022 18:07:02 +0000 mary.j.edmon 638835 at https://www.fema.gov President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Alaska Disaster Declaration https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220727/president-joseph-r-biden-jr-approves-alaska-disaster-declaration <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Alaska Disaster Declaration</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON -- FEMA announced that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the state of Alaska to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by a landslide on May 7, 2022.</p> <p>Federal funding also is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the landslide in the Kenai Peninsula Borough.</p> <p>Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.</p> <p>Yolanda J. Jackson has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further assessments.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/27/2022 - 14:37</span> Wed, 27 Jul 2022 14:37:51 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 638509 at https://www.fema.gov Regional Leaders Named to Federal Wildland Commission https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220810/regional-leaders-named-federal-wildland-commission <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Regional Leaders Named to Federal Wildland Commission </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The Biden-Harris administration selected seven representatives from within FEMA Region 10 states and tribes to serve on the Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission.</p> <p>FEMA, representing the Department of Homeland Security, and the Departments of Interior and Agriculture have announced the selection of members to the Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission. Of the 36 non-federal members selected, seven are located within FEMA Region 10 states and tribes.</p> <p>As an increasing number of communities face wildfires each year and many continue to struggle to recover from recent active wildfire season, the Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission represents a whole of government approach to tackling the wildfire crisis. Members will provide a diverse range of perspectives and expertise to develop ways to address the growing threat of wildfires across the country.</p> <p>Commission members represent federal agencies, state, local, and tribal governments, and the private sector. They are tasked with developing federal policy recommendations to prevent, suppress, manage, and recover from wildland fires as well develop recommendations to more cost effectively meet aerial firefighting equipment needs through 2030. These recommendations will be submitted to Congress within a year of their first meeting.</p> <p>The following members are located within FEMA Region 10:</p> <p><strong>Tim Cook</strong>, Washington State Hazard Mitigation Officer, Washington (seat: State Hazard Mitigation (alternate))</p> <p><strong>Cody Desautel</strong>, Natural Resource Director, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington (seat: Forestry/Industry Representative)</p> <p><strong>Gary Jackson</strong>, Tribal Vice-Chairman, Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, Oregon (seat: Tribal Government Representative (alternate))</p> <p><strong>Elizabeth (Eli) King</strong>, Washington State Energy Management Director, Washington (seat: State Department of Energy or similar State agency)</p> <p><strong>Brian Kittler, </strong>Senior Director of Forest Restoration, American Forests, Oregon (seat: Forest Stewardship and Reforestation (alternate))</p> <p><strong>Kelly Martin</strong>, President of Grassroots Wildland Firefighters, Idaho (seat: Wildland Firefighter)</p> <p><strong>Mariana Ruiz-Temple</strong>, Oregon State Fire Marshal, Oregon (seat: State Fire Response)</p> <p>Details on all commission members are available at the <a href="https://www.usda.gov/topics/disaster-resource-center/wildland-fire/commission/members">Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission website</a>.</p> <p>The Commission was initially established in 2021 as part of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) with a call for nominations issued in March 2022. 500 applications were received, and 36 non-federal members were selected (18 primary and 18 alternates).</p> <p><strong>Contact Us</strong></p> <p>If you have any questions, please contact FEMA Region 10 Office of External Affairs:</p> <ul><li>News Desk at (425) 487-4610 or <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-NewsDesk@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-NewsDesk@fema.dhs.gov</a></li> <li>Congressional Affairs at <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-CongQ@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-CongQ@fema.dhs.gov</a>  </li> <li>Tribal Affairs at <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-Tribal@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-Tribal@fema.dhs.gov</a></li> <li>Private Sector at <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-CommunityPartners@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-CommunityPartners@fema.dhs.gov</a></li> </ul><h3><strong>Follow Us</strong></h3> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <h3><strong>FEMA Mission</strong></h3> <p>Helping people before, during, and after disasters.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/15/2022 - 20:56</span> Fri, 15 Jul 2022 20:56:26 +0000 mary.j.edmon 638246 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Welcomes New Emergency Management Exchange Selectees https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220711/fema-welcomes-new-emergency-management-exchange-selectees <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Welcomes New Emergency Management Exchange Selectees</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON -- Today, FEMA Deputy Administrator Erik A. Hooks welcomed the first group of participants in the new FEMA Emergency Management Exchange program.</p> <p>First announced by Administrator Deanne Criswell in March, the new program offers state, tribal, local and territorial emergency managers and government officials the opportunity to work hand-in-hand with FEMA senior leadership. The program also provides a new avenue to strengthen FEMA’s partnerships with state, territory, tribal and local emergency managers to increase community resilience against disasters.</p> <p>“Today, FEMA welcomes four talented and dedicated public servants to join us on a new collaboration we expect will produce tremendous results,” said Deputy Administrator Hooks. “The willingness of these emergency managers to join us here presents us with opportunities to learn from each other, share best practices and break down barriers, enabling us to better serve communities across our nation.”  </p> <p>The Emergency Management Exchange brings FEMA closer to our stakeholders and highlights the agency’s focus on strengthening the emergency management workforce, a key goal of the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/strategic-plan">2022-2026 FEMA Strategic Plan</a><u>.</u></p> <p>The selected participants were nominated by their home organizations and bring a variety of experiences to their pre-identified exchange assignment.</p> <p>FEMA is pleased to welcome the following government partners to join us for the 2022 Emergency Management Exchange.</p> <ul><li><strong><em>Chas Eby</em></strong>, Deputy Executive Director, Maryland Department of Emergency Management will work to help deliver disaster recovery assistance to survivors and communities in the <strong>Recovery Directorate assignment.</strong></li> <li><strong><em>Delanie Edmunds</em></strong>, Emergency Planner, Idaho Office of Emergency Management will support the mobilization and direction of emergency response resources and capabilities in the <strong>Response Directorate assignment.</strong></li> <li><strong><em>Alexandra Gallo</em></strong>, California Strategic Growth Council, Governor’s Office of Planning and Research will work on climate adaptation policy, programming and public information and services in the<strong> Resilience: Climate assignment. </strong></li> <li><strong><em>Paige Nutter</em></strong>, Hazard Mitigation Coordinator, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma will help to improve disaster outcomes for underserved communities and ensure equitable delivery of FEMA’s programs and services in the <strong>Resilience: Equity assignment.</strong></li> </ul><p>This Emergency Management Exchange will run from July to December 2022, with a future session planned from January to June 2023, where FEMA will send four of its federal employees to participating non-federal governmental programs.</p> <p>To learn more about the emergency management exchange or the work assignments, visit the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/partnerships/emergency-manager-exchange">Emergency Manager Exchange web page</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 07/11/2022 - 21:26</span> Mon, 11 Jul 2022 21:26:09 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 638101 at https://www.fema.gov Don’t Spark a Fire This Fourth of July - Celebrate Your Holiday Safely https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220701/dont-spark-fire-fourth-july-celebrate-your-holiday-safely <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Don’t Spark a Fire This Fourth of July - Celebrate Your Holiday Safely</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – This fire season, FEMA is urging caution with any Fourth of July celebrations that include fireworks, campfires, or grilling and is encouraging residents to be mindful of rising temperatures heading into the summer season. While fireworks and outdoor gatherings go hand-in-hand with the holiday and summer months, they also intensify wildfire danger and may put lives at risk.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nifc.gov/fire-information/nfn#Alaska">Over 1.5 million acres</a> have already burned in the state of Alaska, and over <a href="https://www.drought.gov/states/oregon">52 percent of the state of Oregon is facing severe drought conditions</a>. Outdoor activities (e.g. driving on high grass, camping, grilling) heighten the threat of human-caused wildfires. According to the <a href="https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Data-research-and-tools/US-Fire-Problem/Fireworks-fires-and-injures">National Fire Protection Association</a>, an estimated 19,500 fires reported to local fire departments in the U.S. in 2018 were started by fireworks with more than one-quarter of the fires started by fireworks in 2014-18 reported on the Fourth of July. The <a href="https://www.usfa.fema.gov/blog/cb-060319.html">safest way to enjoy fireworks</a> is to attend a display put on by professionals or view a virtual show. Be sure to heed local regulations for firework use.</p> <p>“With the excitement of the holiday and the long-anticipated arrival of summer weather, it’s easy to forget that certain outdoor activities can pose a risk for wildfires and for our own health and safety,” said FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn. “Between following a few safety tips and taking part in local, professionally-staged fireworks displays and alternative activities, there are countless ways that we can safely enjoy the Fourth of July and the summer season.”</p> <p>As temperatures across the region begin to climb, FEMA encourages everyone to learn <a href="https://www.ready.gov/heat#illness">the signs of heat-related illness</a> and practice extra caution when outdoors and when temperatures reach over 90 degrees:</p> <p>Identify places in your community where you can go to stay cool or check with local authorities for cooling centers near you, wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing, drink plenty of fluids, and be sure to check on family members, seniors, and neighbors.</p> <p>FEMA wishes you a safe and happy holiday weekend and summer season.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/01/2022 - 17:34</span> Fri, 01 Jul 2022 17:34:03 +0000 mary.j.edmon 637866 at https://www.fema.gov Four Pacific Northwest Youth Join the FEMA 2022-2023 Youth Preparedness Council https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220629/four-pacific-northwest-youth-join-fema-2022-2023-youth-preparedness-council <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Four Pacific Northwest Youth Join the FEMA 2022-2023 Youth Preparedness Council</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash.</strong> – FEMA announced the 2022-2023 Youth Preparedness Council members, and four are from states in FEMA Region 10. Katie Clark of Washington and Neha Srinivasan of Oregon are new members joining existing members Miles Butler of Idaho and Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington.</p> <p>FEMA selected 15 new members to join 10 returning council members. Members were selected based on their dedication to public service, community involvement and potential to increase levels of community resilience throughout the country. FEMA created the council in 2012 to bring together diverse young leaders interested in strengthening disaster preparedness across the nation and within their communities.</p> <p>Clark expressed she is eager to expand on her regional Red Cross experience. “I’m…excited to be combining my Red Cross work as a youth preparedness coordinator with my Youth Preparedness Council position to maximize preparedness efforts in my area and to help on a larger scale.”</p> <p>The council supports FEMA’s commitment to build a culture of preparedness in the United States and provides an avenue to engage young people by considering their perspectives, feedback and opinions. Council members meet with FEMA staff throughout their term to provide input on strategies, initiatives and projects.</p> <p>This year, each council member will participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit held virtually in late July. During this annual event, members will participate in online preparedness activities; learn from senior leaders in national preparedness; and engage with FEMA community preparedness staff who offer support and mentorship throughout their term.  </p> <p><strong>The new 2022 council members are:</strong> Sophie Fares of California Lauren Coval of Colorado Taylor Worbington of Florida Vaishnavi Kumbala of Louisiana Navin Ramesh of Massachusetts Theo Illarionov of Massachusetts</p> <p>Janice Saji of Michigan Aarushi Bute of Missouri Meher Harjani of New Jersey Amanda Cisse of New York Kemi Heyward-Rotimi of North Carolina Neha Srinivasan of Oregon Ryan Liu of Texas Layla Ibrahim of Virginia Katie Clark of Washington</p> <p> <strong>The returning council members are:</strong> Isaac Doll of Colorado Aubrey Dockins of Florida Miles Butler of Idaho Beitris Boyreau-Millar of Maryland Ranjana Ramesh of Massachusetts Alexia Nastasia of Missouri Mirika Jambudi of New Jersey Megan Cameron of New York Amira Seay of Texas Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington</p> <p> The next application cycle will open in early 2023. Teens in the eighth through 11th grades may apply online at <a href="https://community.fema.gov/PreparednessCommunity/s/apply-to-ypc">https://community.fema.gov/PreparednessCommunity/s/apply-to-ypc.</a></p> <p>To learn more about FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council, visit: <a href="http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council">http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council.</a></p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter </a>and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn </a>for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov </a>for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 06/29/2022 - 19:36</span> Wed, 29 Jun 2022 19:36:37 +0000 mary.j.edmon 637811 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Announces 2022 Youth Preparedness Council https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220628/fema-announces-2022-youth-preparedness-council <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden"> FEMA Announces 2022 Youth Preparedness Council</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON -- FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell announced the 2022-2023 Youth Preparedness Council members today.</p> <p>FEMA selected 15 new members to join 10 returning council members. Members were selected based on their dedication to public service, community involvement and potential to increase levels of community resilience throughout the country.</p> <p>This year, FEMA celebrates the council’s 10th anniversary. FEMA created the council in 2012 to bring together diverse young leaders interested in strengthening disaster preparedness across the nation and within their communities.</p> <p>“Today, we welcome and celebrate the new Youth Preparedness Council members, who represent the next generation of emergency managers,” said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell. “This culturally diverse, creative and dedicated group of young leaders will build upon the significant contributions made by past council members over the last decade, helping to make their communities more resilient to disasters.”</p> <h2>Youth Preparedness Council Members</h2> <h3>The New 2022 Council Members</h3> <p>Sophie Fares of California</p> <p>Lauren Coval of Colorado</p> <p>Taylor Worbington of Florida</p> <p>Vaishnavi Kumbala of Louisiana</p> <p>Navin Ramesh of Massachusetts</p> <p>Theo Illarionov of Massachusetts</p> <p>Janice Saji of Michigan</p> <p>Aarushi Bute of Missouri</p> <p>Meher Harjani of New Jersey</p> <p>Amanda Cisse of New York</p> <p>Kemi Heyward-Rotimi of North Carolina</p> <p>Neha Srinivasan of Oregon</p> <p>Ryan Liu of Texas</p> <p>Layla Ibrahim of Virginia</p> <p>Katie Clark of Washington</p> <h3>The Returning Council Members</h3> <p>Isaac Doll of Colorado</p> <p>Aubrey Dockins of Florida</p> <p>Miles Butler of Idaho</p> <p>Beitris Boyreau-Millar of Maryland</p> <p>Ranjana Ramesh of Massachusetts</p> <p>Alexia Nastasia of Missouri</p> <p>Mirika Jambudi of New Jersey</p> <p>Megan Cameron of New York</p> <p>Amira Seay of Texas</p> <p>Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington</p> <p>The council demonstrates FEMA’s commitment to promote and sustain a prepared nation. The council provides an avenue to engage young people by considering their perspectives, feedback and opinions. Council members meet with FEMA staff throughout their term to provide input on strategies, initiatives and projects.</p> <p>This year, each council member, all eighth through 12<sup>th</sup> graders, will participate in the Youth Preparedness Council summit held virtually in late July. During this annual event, members will participate in online preparedness activities, learn from senior leaders in national preparedness and engage with FEMA community preparedness staff who offer support and mentorship throughout their term.</p> <p>To learn more about FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council, visit: <a href="/ypc">fema.gov/ypc</a> </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 06/28/2022 - 14:42</span> Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:42:29 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 637748 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Clear Fire in Alaska https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20220627/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-clear-fire-alaska <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Clear Fire in Alaska</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Clear Fire burning in Yukon/Koyukuk Census Area/Denali Borough, Alaska. </p> <p>The state of Alaska’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Administrator Willie G. Nunn on Saturday, June. 25, 2022, at 11:17 p.m. PT. He determined that the Clear Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the first FMAG declared in 2022 to help fight Alaska wildfires. </p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Kobe Ag, Quota, and Anderson subdivisions. The fire also threatened Clear Space Force Radar Station, Golden Valley Electric Cooperative transmission lines, communication towers, the Alaska Highway, the Alaska Railroad, and several tribal allotments in the area. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire. </p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $786,552 will be available to Alaska through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.  </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/27/2022 - 18:15</span> Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:15:23 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 637706 at https://www.fema.gov