https://www.fema.gov/ en FEMA and KIRO-AM Seattle to Unveil New Emergency Broadcast Studio https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211118/fema-and-kiro-am-seattle-unveil-new-emergency-broadcast-studio <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA and KIRO-AM Seattle to Unveil New Emergency Broadcast Studio</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><em>Event Includes a Live Demonstration of the Upgraded Facility, Highlighting Broadcast Radio’s Critical Role in Nation’s Emergency Alert and Warning System</em></p> <p>SEATTLE — Together, FEMA and Bonneville Seattle have completed an important modernization at the emergency radio broadcast facility at Bonneville International’s KIRO-AM 710 in Seattle. This modernization project improves emergency alert systems that provide critical alerts and warnings to the public.</p> <p>The KIRO-AM facility serves as a Primary Entry Point (PEP) station for FEMA’s National Public Warning System (NPWS), maintained under FEMA’s Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS), and provides critical information to the public before, during and after incidents and disasters.</p> <p>Under the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization Act enacted in 2015, Congress required FEMA to upgrade PEP stations across the country to ensure continuity of terrestrial broadcast services under all hazards. PEP stations are specially designated NPWS broadcast stations that serve as the primary intake source of initial broadcasts for a national alert. FEMA equips these stations, which are operated by local station personnel, with backup communications equipment and power generators that enable them to continue broadcasting information to the public during and after an emergency, including conveying official alerts to communities regionally and nationwide. These free-standing emergency studios, located at the radio transmitter sites, are specially designed and hardened to withstand various natural disasters and acts of terrorism. This helps ensure that the President can alert and warn the public under all conditions. Currently, there are 77 PEP stations that are capable of reaching 90 percent of the U.S. population.</p> <p>KIRO-AM is the 14th PEP station to complete the all-hazards upgrade. The modernization to the emergency studio includes increased sheltering capabilities, expanded broadcast capacity, and sustainable power generation for all types of hazardous events, increasing KIRO-AM’s resiliency to continue broadcasting during emergencies.</p> <p>“It’s an honor for Bonneville Seattle to serve the community and we are proud to partner with FEMA. We share and salute the agency’s commitment to protecting the public,” said Darrell Brown, President, Bonneville International. “Radio is a lifeline, and the new studio and continued investment will ensure KIRO-AM 710’s resiliency during times of crisis when communication is vital.”</p> <p>"For generations, the KIRO-AM signal has been designated by the federal government as the one to broadcast critical information in case of a major disaster," said Cathy Cangiano, Senior VP/Market Manager, Bonneville Seattle. "It's a responsibility we take seriously. We are committed to getting out lifesaving information when our region needs us."</p> <p>If required, and in a national worst-case scenario, KIRO-AM would broadcast a message from the President or other national authorities within 10 minutes. Via FEMA’s Emergency Alert System, other radio stations in the Seattle area would begin re-broadcasting the information coming from KIRO and its news staff. Local authorities, such as the King County Office of Emergency Management, may also disseminate life-saving information by way of the new facilities installed at the KIRO tower site.</p> <p>FEMA, KIRO and King County are partners in distributing life-saving emergency information to the public.</p> <p>FEMA and Bonneville Seattle will hold an event on Friday, November 19, 2021, (11 a.m. to 1 p.m. PT) to unveil the upgraded KIRO-AM transmitter and PEP Site (22805 Dockton Road SW, Vashon, WA 98070.) The news conference will include FEMA and local officials, as well as a live demonstration from KIRO-AM 710 on-air hosts.</p> <p>Speakers include:</p> <ul><li>Antwane Johnson, Director, Integrated Public Alert and Warning System, FEMA</li> <li>Manny Centeno, IPAWS Program Manager, FEMA</li> <li>Brendan McCluskey, Director, King County Office of Emergency Management</li> <li>Jason Shirron, Technical Operations Coordinator, King County OEM</li> <li>Vince Maykovich, Acting Regional Administrator, FEMA Region 10</li> <li>Cathy Cangiano, VP/Market Manager, Bonneville Seattle</li> <li>Jason Ornellas, Regional Director of Engineering, Bonneville International West Region</li> <li>Dave Ross, On-Air Host, KIRO Radio 97.3 FM</li> </ul><p>For more information about IPAWS or the PEP modernization effort, go to FEMA’s website at <a href="https://www.fema.gov/emergency-managers/practitioners/integrated-public-alert-warning-system/broadcasters-wireless">https://www.fema.gov/emergency-managers/practitioners/integrated-public-alert-warning-</a> <a href="https://www.fema.gov/emergency-managers/practitioners/integrated-public-alert-warning-system/broadcasters-wireless">system/broadcasters-wireless. </a>To learn more about Bonneville Seattle and KIRO-AM 710 Seattle, visit <a href="https://bonneville.com/our-markets/seattle/">https://bonneville.com/our-markets/seattle/.</a></p> <p>For more information on attending the news conference, please RSVP and direct any questions to Jenette Warne at (206) 726-7000 <a href="mailto:jwarne@bonneville.com">jwarne@bonneville.com </a>or the FEMA Region 10 News Desk at</p> <p>(425) 487-4610, <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-NewsDesk@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-NewsDesk@fema.dhs.gov.</a></p> <p>###</p> <p>About FEMA:</p> <p>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during and after disasters. Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter </a>and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn </a>for the latest updates and visit FEMA.gov for more information. <em>FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.</em></p> <p>About Bonneville:</p> <p>Bonneville Seattle owns and operates KIRO-AM (710 ESPN Seattle), KIRO Radio 97.3 FM, AM 770 KTTH and is part of <a href="http://www.bonneville.com/">Bonneville International. </a>Bonneville International is an integrated media and marketing solutions company dedicated to building up, connecting, informing, and celebrating families and communities.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 11/18/2021 - 19:25</span> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 19:25:10 +0000 mary.j.edmon 628587 at https://www.fema.gov Canyon County Facing Probation from the National Flood Insurance Program https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211022/canyon-county-facing-probation-national-flood-insurance-program <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Canyon County Facing Probation from the National Flood Insurance Program </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – <a>Canyon County, Idaho, will be placed on probationary status by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) on December 21, 2021, due to violations in the community’s floodplain management program.</a></p> <p>Canyon County is an NFIP-participating community with 178 flood insurance policies in force that cover more than $45 million as of October 13, 2021.</p> <p>When a community joins the NFIP, it voluntarily adopts local floodplain management regulations to meet NFIP minimum floodplain management criteria. Placement on probation is a formal notice to the community that the local floodplain management program is not compliant with the criteria of the NFIP and is the first step in the process to suspend the community’s eligibility to participate in the NFIP.</p> <p>The probation will continue until all identified violations of the community’s floodplain management regulations are remedied to the maximum extent practicable.</p> <p>The identified program deficiencies include:</p> <ol><li>Necessary ordinance revisions to bring the floodplain management program into compliance with the NFIP minimum criteria.</li> <li>Failure to obtain or require permits for accessory structures and other development within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) that falls outside the requirements of building codes.</li> <li>Failure to obtain or require permits and certification of elevation or other as-built documentation for 73 floodplain development actions in the SFHA.</li> </ol><p>FEMA and the Canyon County Floodplain Administrator have communicated many times between 2015 and 2021, through meetings, letters, and emails. Canyon County previously committed to a compliance plan with milestones and deadlines for remedying the outstanding violations that have been identified. To date, Canyon County has not met the milestones provided in their compliance plan; and violations remain in the County’s floodplain management program.</p> <p>During the probationary period, flood insurance coverage will remain available within Canyon County. However, a $50 surcharge will be added to the premium of each new and renewed flood insurance policy sold within the community for at least one-year from the effective date of probation. Each flood insurance policyholder in unincorporated Canyon County will receive a notice about the impending probation and the $50 surcharge.</p> <p>Failure to correct identified deficiencies and to improve the floodplain management program within Canyon County during the probationary period can lead to suspension from the NFIP. If a flood disaster occurs in a suspended community, most types of federal disaster assistance would not be available. This includes the acquisition, construction, or repair of insurable structures within the SFHA as well as federal assistance to individuals and households for housing and personal property.</p> <p>FEMA remains committed to providing technical assistance and guidance to remediate any deficiencies to help ensure that Canyon County residents and property owners continue to have flood insurance coverage available.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> ,and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a>, for the latest updates. Visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 10/22/2021 - 21:46</span> Fri, 22 Oct 2021 21:46:41 +0000 mary.j.edmon 627802 at https://www.fema.gov King County Library System and FEMA Partnership Makes Registering for Funeral Assistance Easier https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211013/king-county-library-system-and-fema-partnership-makes-registering-funeral <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">King County Library System and FEMA Partnership Makes Registering for Funeral Assistance Easier</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>BOTHELL, Wash. – A partnership between the King County Library System (KCLS) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) improves community access to the technology and resources needed to register for FEMA Funeral Assistance. This collaboration between KCLS and FEMA connects people with free community resources and expertise at libraries throughout King County (outside the city of Seattle).</p> <p>If you incurred COVID-19-related funeral, burial, or cremation expenses on or after January 20, 2020, FEMA may be able to help you with some of those costs. Applying for FEMA Funeral Assistance begins with a phone call to (844) 684-6333. Applicants must <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/coronavirus/economic/funeral-assistance/faq#documentation">provide documentation</a> before FEMA can fully process their application. Individuals who need help submitting their paperwork can use KCLS library scanners, computers, fax machines, and internet access to upload files; Library staff are available to assist with the process. Reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities are available by request.</p> <p>“While nothing can replace those we’ve lost to COVID-19, FEMA Funeral Assistance can help ease the financial burden of placing our loved ones to rest. It is vital that we remove digital barriers that might prevent someone from applying for this assistance,” says Acting Regional Administrator Vince Maykovich. “Just as library resources and staff deliver essential community services during periods of extreme heat or cold, they can provide access to information and resources to help anyone transmitting their FEMA application.”</p> <p>“As trusted sources of information and assistance, public libraries are well-versed in connecting community members to important resources,” stated KCLS Executive Director Lisa Rosenblum. “KCLS extends our services and support to King County residents, and we hope this partnership helps our communities in their times of need.”</p> <p>To apply for FEMA Funeral Assistance, call (844) 684-6333. The helpline is open Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. P.T.. Multilingual services are available. If you use a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service. You must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien to apply. However, there is no requirement for the deceased person to have been a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national or qualified alien. A funeral assistance video describing eligibility is available in <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&amp;v=4VN5STcJvtk">English </a>and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llHVrs2A2xY">Spanish</a>; view and share today.</p> <p>To make an appointment with a King County Library, call (800) 462-9600 or schedule an appointment with a KCLS Digital Navigator, visit the <a href="https://kcls.org/computer-help/">Computer and Internet Help page</a> at KCLS.org/Computer-Help.</p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Program, visit: <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/coronavirus/economic/funeral-assistance">COVID-19 Funeral Assistance | FEMA.gov</a>.</p> <p>About the King County Library System Founded in 1942, the King County Library System (KCLS) is one of the busiest public library systems in the country. Serving the communities of King County (outside the city of Seattle), KCLS has 50 libraries and over 1.1 million cardholders. In 2020, residents checked out more than 7.4 million digital eBooks and audiobooks through Rakuten OverDrive, making KCLS the No. 3 digital circulating library system in the world and the highest per capita in the U.S. In 2011, KCLS was named Library of the Year by Gale/Library Journal. Follow KCLS on <a href="https://twitter.com/KCLS">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/kingcountylibrarysystem?fref=photo">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/kingcountylibrary">YouTube</a> for the latest updates, and visit <a href="http://www.kcls.org/">kcls.org</a> for more information.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 10/13/2021 - 19:32</span> Wed, 13 Oct 2021 19:32:53 +0000 mary.j.edmon 627451 at https://www.fema.gov Washington Commission on Hispanic Affairs and FEMA Partner to Support Hispanic/Latinx Communities https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211006/washington-commission-hispanic-affairs-and-fema-partner-support <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Washington Commission on Hispanic Affairs and FEMA Partner to Support Hispanic/Latinx Communities </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – The Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs (CHA) and FEMA are partnering to expand access to the FEMA Funeral Assistance Program for Hispanic/Latinx communities in Washington. This collaboration is an opportunity for FEMA to work with the Commission to engage with, inform, and reach Hispanic/Latinx community members who have lost a loved one to COVID-19.</p> <p>“The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have—and continue to be—devastating,” says Vince Maykovich, Acting FEMA Region 10 Administrator. “By partnering with CHA, we want to build relationships with Hispanic/Latinx communities in Washington and raise awareness about how to register and participate in FEMA’s Funeral Assistance program.”</p> <p>“We facilitate access to information and resources to the Hispanic/Latinx communities across the state of Washington. This means that we advise, lead, and help make sure that information is delivered in a digestible, culturally relevant way. We hope to aid in raising awareness about this valuable and important program in our community. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected the Hispanic/Latinx community in our state, and we hope this information encourages our community to apply to this program and help ease the financial aspects of placing a loved one to rest,” says María Sigüenza, Executive Director of the Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs.</p> <p>If you incurred COVID-19-related funeral, burial, or cremation expenses on or after January 20, 2020, FEMA may be able to help you with some of those costs. To apply, call FEMA at 844-684-6333. The helpline is open Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. PT. Multilingual services are available. If you use a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service. You must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien to apply. However, there is no eligibility requirement for the deceased person to have been a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien. A funeral assistance video describing eligibility is available in <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&amp;v=4VN5STcJvtk">English</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llHVrs2A2xY">Spanish</a>, view and share today.</p> <p>For more information about FEMA’s COVID-19 Funeral Assistance Program visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/coronavirus/economic/funeral-assistance">FEMA.gov</a>.</p> <p>###</p> <p> </p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 10/06/2021 - 18:55</span> Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:55:49 +0000 mary.j.edmon 627197 at https://www.fema.gov President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Major Disaster Declaration for North Dakota https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210902/president-joseph-r-biden-jr-approves-major-disaster-declaration-north-dakota <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Major Disaster Declaration for North Dakota</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON — FEMA announced today that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the state of North Dakota to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by a severe storm, straight-line winds and flooding from June 7-11, 2021.</p> <p>Federal funding also is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storm, straight-line winds and flooding in Burke, Divide, Emmons, Grant, Kidder, LaMoure, Sioux and Williams counties.</p> <p>Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.</p> <p>Lance Davis has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected areas. Davis said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further assessments.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mashana.davis</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 09/02/2021 - 00:33</span> Thu, 02 Sep 2021 00:33:33 +0000 mashana.davis 624838 at https://www.fema.gov September is National Preparedness Month https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210901/september-national-preparedness-month <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">September is National Preparedness Month</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>BOTHELL, Wash. – National Preparedness Month is observed each September to raise awareness about steps individuals, families and communities can take to be ready for disasters and emergencies that could happen at any time. This year’s National Preparedness Month theme is Prepare to Protect and highlights how preparing for disaster helps protect everyone you love.</p> <p> “Everyone has a role to play when it comes to preparing for disasters and emergencies,” says Acting Regional Administrator Vince Maykovich. “Whether it is getting to know your neighbors, updating your contact lists, changing the batteries in your smoke detectors, or having extra food on hand for your pet, I urge everyone to take an action and be a part of this year’s National Preparedness Month.” Each week in September, the campaign will focus on a different aspect of preparedness for individuals, families and communities.</p> <ul><li>Week 1: Sept. 1-4 Make A Plan</li> <li>Week 2: Sept. 5-11 Build A Kit</li> <li>Week 3: Sept. 12-18 Low-Cost, No-Cost Preparedness</li> <li>Week 4: Sept. 19-25 Engage Your Community on Preparedness</li> </ul><p> In partnership with the state emergency management offices and community partners in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, FEMA Region 10 is hosting several virtual sessions throughout the month for everyone to attend.</p> <ul><li><a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter </a>Spaces Preparedness Chat on September 13 from 12 – 1 p.m. PT</li> <li>R10 Family Prep Night <a href="http://bit.ly/3yzJ3kV">Webinar </a>on September 14 from 6:30 – 7:15 p.m. PT</li> <li>Livestock &amp; Large Animals Preparedness <a href="https://bit.ly/AnimalPrep2">Webinar </a>on September 17 from 10 – 11 a.m. PT</li> </ul><p> You can visit the <a href="https://fema.connectsolutions.com/r10communityprep/">FEMA Region 10 Individual and Community Preparedness Dashboard</a> for additional information on how to attend these virtual events. For more information on creating a family communication plan or building an emergency kit, visit <a href="http://www.ready.gov/">ready.gov</a>.</p> <p> ###</p> <p> Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information. FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 09/01/2021 - 22:01</span> Wed, 01 Sep 2021 22:01:17 +0000 mary.j.edmon 624827 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Schneider Springs Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5415/20210820/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-schneider-springs-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Schneider Springs Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Schneider Springs Fire burning in Yakima County, Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, at 6:25 p.m. PT. He determined that the Schneider Springs Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the eighth FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Washington wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Nile and Cliffdell. The fire also threatened critical communications infrastructure as well as fishing streams and spawning sites for threatened species.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/20/2021 - 20:20</span> Fri, 20 Aug 2021 20:20:54 +0000 hannah.weinstein 623985 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Twenty-Five Mile Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5414/20210818/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-twenty-five-mile-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Twenty-Five Mile Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash.</strong> –  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal fund to help with firefighting costs for the Twenty-Five Mile Fire burning in Chelan County, Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Administrator Vince Maykovich on Monday, August 17, 2021, at 10:39 p.m. PT. He determined that the Twenty-Five Mile Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the seventh FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Washington wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the request, the fire threatened buildings in and around the west side of Lake Chelan and homes alongside South Lakeshore Road. The fire also threatened critical communications infrastructure.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President’s Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have burned land within a designated area.  </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/18/2021 - 22:48</span> Wed, 18 Aug 2021 22:48:07 +0000 mary.j.edmon 623530 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Ford Corkscrew Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5411/20210817/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-ford-corkscrew-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Ford Corkscrew Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Ford Corkscrew Fire burning in Stevens County, Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021, at 8:41 p.m. PT. He determined that the Ford Corkscrew Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the sixth FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Washington wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire threatened homes in and around the communities of Ford, Springdale, Loon Lake, and Clayton. The fire also threatened cell phone towers and critical communications infrastructure.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mary.j.edmon</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 08/17/2021 - 18:45</span> Tue, 17 Aug 2021 18:45:38 +0000 mary.j.edmon 623464 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Muckamuck Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5410/20210816/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-muckamuck-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Muckamuck Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Muckamuck Fire burning in Okanogan County, Washington.</p> <p>The state of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021, at 12:41 a.m. PT. He determined that the Muckamuck Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the fifth FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Washington wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire was threatening the entire town of Conconully. The fire was also threatening both overhead and underground power lines and other infrastructure.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/16/2021 - 19:46</span> Mon, 16 Aug 2021 19:46:36 +0000 hannah.weinstein 623389 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Patton Meadow Fire in Oregon https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5409/20210816/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-patton-meadow-fire-oregon <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Patton Meadow Fire in Oregon</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><table><tbody><tr><td> <p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Patton Meadow Fire burning in Lake County, Oregon.</p> <p>The state of Oregon’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021, at 12:14 a.m. PT. He determined that the Patton Meadow Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the third FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Oregon wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire was threatening homes in and around the community of Lakeview. The fire was also threatening power lines, cultural resources in the Klamath Basin and critical communications equipment on Grizzly Peak, including radio repeaters, law enforcement networks and a cellular tower.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $584,083 will be available to Oregon through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/16/2021 - 18:44</span> Mon, 16 Aug 2021 18:44:01 +0000 hannah.weinstein 623386 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bedrock Fire in Idaho https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5407/20210813/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-bedrock-fire-idaho <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bedrock Fire in Idaho</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Bedrock Fire burning in Nez Perce County, Idaho, and on the Nez Perce Reservation.</p> <p>The state of Idaho’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Friday, August 13, 2021, at 12:32 a.m. PT. He determined that the Bedrock Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the first FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Idaho wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire was threatening homes in and around the community of Lenore. The fire has already burned some outbuildings and residences in the community and was also threatening a tribal fish hatchery, a post office, shops, barns, equipment sheds and transmission lines owned by Bonneville Power Administration.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>In addition to the firefighting funds authorized under this FMAG, another $584,083 will be available to Idaho through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of future wildfires and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area.   </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">visit this page on FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/13/2021 - 19:31</span> Fri, 13 Aug 2021 19:31:43 +0000 hannah.weinstein 623297 at https://www.fema.gov Biden Administration Commits Historic $3.46 Billion in Hazard Mitigation Funds to Reduce Effects of Climate Change https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210805/biden-administration-commits-historic-346-billion-hazard-mitigation-funds <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Biden Administration Commits Historic $3.46 Billion in Hazard Mitigation Funds to Reduce Effects of Climate Change</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON – President Biden today approved more than $3.46 billion to increase resilience to the impacts of climate change nationwide. This significant investment will be available for natural hazard mitigation measures across the 59 major disaster declarations issued due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.</p> <p>With the growing climate change crisis facing the nation, FEMA’s <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/hazard-mitigation">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program</a> will provide funding to states, tribes, and territories for mitigation projects to reduce the impacts of climate change. Every state, tribe, and territory that received a major disaster declaration in response to the COVID-19 pandemic will be eligible to receive 4% of those disaster costs to invest in mitigation projects that reduce risks from natural disasters. This influx of funding will help communities prioritize mitigation needs for a more resilient future, including underserved communities that are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. These projects can help address effects of climate change and other unmet mitigation needs, including using funds to promote equitable outcomes in underserved communities</p> <p>“The Department of Homeland Security is committed to helping build stronger and more resilient communities that are prepared for future disasters,” said Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas. “States, tribes, territories, and localities will now receive the funding needed to treat the climate crisis with the sense of urgency it demands.  Through this funding, communities across the nation will have the critical resources needed to invest in adaptation and resilience, and take meaningful action to combat the effects of climate change.  This funding will also help to ensure the advancement of equity in all communities, especially those that are disproportionately at risk from climate change impacts.”</p> <p>"Climate change is our country’s biggest crisis. Our communities will continue to suffer from losses caused by extreme weather events unless we invest in mitigation efforts to reduce the impacts of climate change. This new funding is a tangible solution that we can implement today to help prevent future disasters. It will allow us to provide direct aid to states, tribes, and territories to complete mitigation projects, strengthen our infrastructure, identify long term solutions to these hazards and ultimately make a real difference in our communities,” said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell.</p> <p>Communities across the country have been impacted by the enormous effects of hurricanes, floods, wildfires, earthquakes, and other events. The increasing duration, intensity, and severity of such disasters—which are exacerbated by climate change as well as changes in population, land use, and weather patterns—are alarming and devastating, especially for underserved populations.</p> <p>For eligible mitigation projects, HMGP funding can cover 75% of total project costs and states or communities cover the remaining share. Preparing and mitigating for the impacts of climate change, which is one of the most important threats facing the United States, requires the full collaboration of the Federal Government to support state, local, tribal, and territorial governments.</p> <p>The FEMA <a href="/sites/default/files/documents/fema_mitigation-action-portfolio-support-document.pdf">Mitigation Action Portfolio</a> includes examples of innovative mitigation projects that address many types of natural hazards and emphasize the importance of collaboration between governments, private sector entities, and non-governmental organizations in order to achieve effective hazard mitigation and disaster resilience.  For example, mitigation projects can:</p> <ul><li>Reduce risks associated with climate change, such as wildfires, drought, increased flooding, and coastal erosion, through the use of nature-based features, such as storm water parks, living shorelines, and land conservation.</li> <li>Address persistent residential vulnerabilities by mitigating repetitive loss structures affected by flooding.</li> <li>Help utilities or other critical facilities adapt to future conditions and reduce risks, through microgrids, seismic and wind retrofits, flood protection, and other infrastructure protection measures. </li> </ul><p>This one-time investment represents a 23% increase in the funding made available for declared disasters since the program’s inception. Over the past 30 years, this program has made more than $15 billion available to states, tribes, and territories to make communities more resilient and reduce risks from future disasters.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>zella.campbell</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/05/2021 - 19:31</span> Thu, 05 Aug 2021 19:31:02 +0000 zella.campbell 622491 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Awards ODOT More Than $34 Million for Debris Removal in Wildfire Affected Counties https://www.fema.gov/press-release/4562/20210804/fema-awards-odot-more-34-million-debris-removal-wildfire-affected-counties <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Awards ODOT More Than $34 Million for Debris Removal in Wildfire Affected Counties</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Salem, Ore.</strong> –<a> FEMA has approved $34,488,250 for the State of Oregon to defray the costs of debris removal throughout Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Lincoln and Marion counties from 2020’s devastating wildfires under FEMA’s Public Assistance Program (PA).</a></p> <p><a>FEMA</a> funds will reimburse the Oregon Department of Transportation for the collection, removal and disposal of debris from destroyed structures throughout Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Lincoln and Marion counties following the September 2020 wildfires.</p> <ul><li><strong>Douglas County</strong> $2,036,091 in PA funds were obligated for contractors to gather and haul away an estimated 8,339 tons of mixed debris from approximately 65 private residential properties.</li> <li><strong>Jackson County</strong> $10,274,429 in PA funds were obligated for contractors to gather and haul away an estimated 42,079 tons of mixed debris from approximately 328 private residential properties.</li> <li><strong>Lane County</strong> <a>$6,734,763 in PA funds were obligated for contractors to gather and haul away an estimated 27,582 tons of mixed debris from approximately 215 private residential properties.</a></li> <li><strong>Lincoln County</strong> $3,508,341 in PA funds were obligated for contractors to gather and haul away an estimated 19,961 tons of mixed debris from approximately 112 private residential properties.</li> <li><strong>Marion County</strong> $11,934,626 in PA funds were obligated for contractors to gather and haul away an estimated 48,878 tons of mixed debris from approximately 381 private residential properties.</li> </ul><p>Debris removed from these properties included: miscellaneous metals (excluding vehicles); burned debris and ash; contaminated soil; and vegetative debris (hazardous trees) that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety from private property for disposal.</p> <p>ODOT obtained the authority to remove debris on private property—not including commercial property— by signed right of entry agreements between the county and private property owners.</p> <p>Funding for this Public Assistance (PA) project is authorized under Sections 403 of the Robert T. Stafford Act for Oregon to cover wildfire-related expenses, reimbursing eligible applicants for the cost of debris removal; life-saving emergency protective measures; and the repair, replacement or restoration of disaster-damaged facilities like buildings, roads and utilities.</p> <p>FEMA’s PA grant program is an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) works with FEMA during all phases of the PA program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.</p> <p>Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop project worksheets and scopes of work. Following approvals by FEMA and OEM, FEMA obligates funding for the project.</p> <p>FEMA’s PA program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain types of private non-profit organizations including some houses of worship, so that communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.</p> <p>The federal share for PA projects is not less than 75% of the eligible cost. The state determines how the non-federal share of the cost of a project (up to 25%) is split with the sub-recipients like local and county governments.</p> <p>###</p> <p>Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Those who use a Relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their assigned number for that service. They should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number. Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish)</p> <p>Disaster survivors affected by the Oregon wildfires and straight-line winds can also get personalized mitigation advice to repair and rebuild safer and stronger from a FEMA Mitigation Specialist. For information on how to rebuild safer and stronger or to inquire as to your new flood risk following a fire near you, email <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov</a>, a FEMA Hazard Mitigation specialist will respond survivor inquiries. When rebuilding check with your local building official and floodplain administrator for guidance.</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMARegion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4562">fema.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 08/04/2021 - 17:11</span> Wed, 04 Aug 2021 17:11:20 +0000 hannah.weinstein 622457 at https://www.fema.gov ICYMI: FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell Traveled West to Address Climate Change, Connect with State, Tribal Leaders on Wildfire Response and Mitigation Efforts https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210729/icymi-fema-administrator-deanne-criswell-traveled-west-address-climate <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">ICYMI: FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell Traveled West to Address Climate Change, Connect with State, Tribal Leaders on Wildfire Response and Mitigation Efforts</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON – Last week, FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell and acting U.S. Fire Administrator&nbsp;Chief Tonya Hoover, traveled to Idaho, Oregon and California to meet with federal, state&nbsp;and tribal officials for discussions on wildfire preparedness, response and mitigation efforts.</p> <p>“We spent our time out West connecting directly with state and tribal leaders who were ready to have tough conversations about what their communities are going through in the face of climate change,” said Administrator Criswell. “Wildfires are a central part of the larger climate crisis our country is facing, and we can’t shy away from the work that must be done to mitigate future risk.”</p> <p>The 2021 wildfire season has already burned nearly 3.4 million acres across 13 states in the U.S. and FEMA has approved 19 Fire Management Assistance Grants&nbsp;in support of state wildfire fighting efforts.</p> <p>“Wildfires aren’t seasonal anymore; they are a year-round threat,” said Administrator Criswell. “FEMA’s investment in reducing the impact of climate change isn’t seasonal either, it’s the biggest thing we are doing right now and we’re doing it every day.”</p> <p>On Tuesday, July 20 Administrator Criswell traveled to Idaho where she visited the Idaho Office of Emergency Management to meet with Director Brad Richy and the National Interagency Fire Center. While at the center, she was briefed by the National Multi-Agency Coordination Group&nbsp;on wildfire threats around the country. The center recently raised the National Wildland Fire Preparedness level to Level 5 (highest level), which is the earliest the level has been reached in the past 10 years.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <img src="/sites/default/files/photos/fema_f1-wildfire-response-mitigation-efforts-2.jpg" alt="From left, Idaho Office of Emergency Management Director Brad Richy, acting U.S. Fire Administrator, Chief Tonya Hoover, FEMA Region 10 acting Administrator Vince Maykovich, FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell, White House National Security Council representative Caitlin Durkovich, USFA representative Aitor Bidaburu and NIFC representative Grant Cogswell outside of the Smoke Jumpers base at the NIFC." style="width:65%"> <p>BOISE, Idaho (July 20, 2021) – From left, Idaho Office of Emergency Management Director Brad Richy, acting U.S. Fire Administrator&nbsp;Chief Tonya Hoover, FEMA Region 10 acting Administrator Vince Maykovich, Administrator Criswell, White House National Security Council representative Caitlin Durkovich, U.S. Fire Administration representative Aitor Bidaburu and National Interagency Fire Center representative Grant Cogswell outside of the Smoke Jumpers base at the center.</p> <p><a>On Wednesday, July 21 Administrator Criswell traveled to Oregon, where she was hosted by the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Chairwoman Cheryle A. Kennedy along with other tribal leaders and emergency managers from five Oregon tribes for a discussion on wildfire priorities and challenges. The Administrator also visited Oregon for a meeting with Gov.&nbsp;Kate Brown and Oregon’s Emergency Management Director, Andrew Phelps. The Administrator was provided with an update on Oregon’s active response to the Bootleg fire as well as possible mitigation strategies to combat future heat emergencies. </a></p> <p>The Administrator met and thanked the FEMA staff working in Salem&nbsp;and was accompanied by the Region 10 acting Regional Administrator&nbsp;Vincent Maykovich.</p> <p>Gov. Kate Brown issued a <a href="https://www.oregon.gov/newsroom/Pages/NewsDetail.aspx?newsid=64148">statement</a> following her meeting with Administrator Criswell to discuss ongoing wildfire recovery efforts and natural disaster preparedness moving forward.</p> <img src="/sites/default/files/photos/fema_f1-wildfire-response-mitigation-efforts.jpg" alt="FEMA Administrator Criswell (left) sits with Tribal Council Chairwoman Cheryle A. Kennedy at the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde." style="width:65%"> <p>GRAND RONDE, Ore. (July 21, 2021) – Administrator Criswell (left) sits with Tribal Council Chairwoman Cheryle A. Kennedy at the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde.<br /> &nbsp;</p> <img src="/sites/default/files/photos/fema_f1-wildfire-response-mitigation-efforts-3.jpg" alt="FEMA Administrator Criswell meets with Oregon Governor Kate Brown, Oregon Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps and acting U.S. Fire Administrator Tonya Hoover for a discussion on the state’s wildfire preparedness efforts." style="width:65%"> <p>PORTLAND, Ore. (July 21, 2021) – Administrator Criswell (right, center) meets with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (left, center), Oregon Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps and acting U.S. Fire Administrator Tonya Hoover for a discussion on the state’s wildfire preparedness efforts.<br />&nbsp;</p> <p>On Thursday, July 22 Administrator Criswell traveled to California where she was hosted by California Gov. Gavin Newsom, California Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) Director Mark Ghilarducci, and California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention Director Thom Porter and leadership for briefings and tours of areas affected by wildfires and the ongoing drought. California leaders briefed the Administrator on their forest and vegetation management&nbsp;and mitigation actions, and the group. The group surveyed Folsom Lake, which is currently at 26% capacity. While at Folsom Lake, the Administrator was briefed on drought conditions, cascading impacts and the state’s current response actions. CalOES hosted a wrap-up discussion at their headquarters, focused on recovery and mitigation, and the partnerships, challenges, actions&nbsp;and projects the state is currently focused on. FEMA Region 9 Administrator Robert Fenton joined Administrator Criswell throughout her trip to make introductions to federal, state and tribal officials and help facilitate discussions.</p> <p>Gov. Newsom issued a <a href="https://www.gov.ca.gov/2021/07/22/governor-newsom-meets-with-new-fema-administrator-on-devastation-of-climate-crisis-signs-resources-budget-trailer-bill/">statement</a> following his tour with Administrator Criswell of Folsom Lake reservoir and North Fork American River Shaded Fuel Break in Placer County.</p> <img src="/sites/default/files/photos/fema_f1-wildfire-response-mitigation-efforts-4.jpg" alt="FEMA Administrator Criswell meets with California Governor Gavin Newsom (center) and CalOES Director Mark Ghilarducci (right) outside of CAL FIRE Station 30." style="width:65%"> <p>SACRAMENTO, Calif. (July 22, 2021) – Administrator Criswell meets with California Gov. Gavin Newsom (center) and California Office of Emergency Services Director Mark Ghilarducci (right) outside of California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention Station 30.</p> </div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/29/2021 - 17:36</span> Thu, 29 Jul 2021 17:36:35 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 622206 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Cedar Creek Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5401/20210721/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-cedar-creek-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Cedar Creek Fire in Washington </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Cedar Creek Fire burning in Okanogan County, Washington.</p> <p>The State of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) was approved by FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich on Tues., July 20, 2021, at 2:50 p.m. PT. He determined that the Cedar Creek Fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. This is the fourth FMAG declared to help fight Washington wildfires in 2021.</p> <p>At the time of the state’s request, the wildfire was threatening homes in and around the community of Mazama and the north end of the Methow Valley. The fire was also threatening recreational, electrical and communications infrastructure as well as roads, utilities, and businesses in the area.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair, and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. This authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, an additional $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/21/2021 - 16:49</span> Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:49:48 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621845 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Announces Initial Initiatives to Advance Equity https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210721/fema-announces-initial-initiatives-advance-equity <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Announces Initial Initiatives to Advance Equity</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Today, FEMA announced two initiatives to advance equity across the agency, which are the first step in focusing the agency toward reducing barriers and increasing opportunities.  The two major initiatives are the formation of an Equity Enterprise Steering Group and the establishment of a robust stakeholder engagement process to develop the agency’s 2022 – 2026 Strategic Plan. Both initiatives include internal and external stakeholders to reflect the agency’s commitment to advancing equity. These actions are just the first of many planned for the coming months.   </p> <p>Too many disaster survivors face barriers in accessing assistance programs and resources to support their recovery. Certain populations – specifically low-income neighborhoods, communities of color, people with disabilities and older adults, those with language barriers and those living in rural and isolated areas – are disproportionately impacted by disasters. FEMA is committed to ensuring disaster assistance programs do not exacerbate existing inequal conditions.</p> <p>“We’re turning a page at FEMA and infusing equity throughout our agency, programs, and policies to better serve people who face unique barriers before, during and after disasters,” said FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell. “Systemic racism across institutions and society has sidelined generations of people of color and low-income households and that practice needs to end.”</p> <p>The new Equity Enterprise Steering Group is focused on assessing issues like access and delivery of FEMA programs, services, and activities. Members include representatives from each of the major offices across the agency and is co-chaired by the Office of Equal Rights and the Office of Response and Recovery. The group is designed to drive forward our commitment to equity in every part of the agency, not just certain programs. </p> <p>FEMA is developing the 2022-2026 Strategic Plan through inputs from stakeholders within the agency and beyond to reflect a whole of community perspective. Stakeholders will inform the agency’s goals and objectives, with equity as a foundational priority for the coming years.</p> <p>Administrator Criswell added: “As emergency managers, we must meet people where they are. Our first steps forward will shape future decisions by engaging our teams, partners, key stakeholders, and the public to boost access and reduce barriers. In time, we hope our work will ultimately lead to systematic generational change for underserved populations in disaster-prone communities.”</p> <h2>Increasing Additional Equitable Measures</h2> <p>FEMA continues to use equity as a lens to drive response operations and deliver better services to marginalized and other vulnerable populations. While FEMA continues to work towards creating equitable outcomes for survivors, the agency is working within this specific authorities and responsibilities to make changes, including: </p> <ul><li><strong>Spearheading a successful Community Vaccination Centers Mission</strong> to combat COVID-19 and administer vaccinations, in which more than 58% of all vaccines were given to individuals of color, provides a model for how equity considerations can be incorporated into other policies and programs.</li> <li><strong>Encouraging active employee engagement </strong>to ensure internal discussions generate new ideas on workplace diversity, equity, and inclusion. Diverse organizations such as FEMA’s Employee Resource Groups and other employee-led groups have partnered with senior leadership to seek ideas and input.</li> <li><strong>Hosting a Command and General Staff “Equity Stand Down” </strong>with over 400 FEMA field leaders on Aug. 4-5. This will provide critical information on civil rights law, equity levers field leaders can pull to enhance equity, and training on how to use the many tools available within FEMA to incorporate equity into tactical decision making (e.g., where to place Disaster Recovery Centers).</li> <li><a><strong>Issuing a request for information</strong></a><strong> </strong><strong>and began soliciting public comment on our programs to help identify regulations and policies</strong> that may benefit from modification, streamlining, expansion or repeal to better address climate change and underserved communities and populations. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/event/public-comment-period-climate-change-and-underserved-populations">request for information</a> closed today, July 21.</li> <li><strong>Assessing several programs </strong>to determine where the agency can make improvements and where there is a need for support from other federal partners and the legislative branch.</li> <li><strong>Expanding eligibility criteria for Critical Needs Assistance</strong> to include applicants who state they have a need for shelter but have not been able to leave their damaged dwelling.</li> <li><strong>Expanding access by integrating a Documentation Drop Off Center model</strong> for Disaster Recovery Centers that enables survivors to submit documentation in-person, notifies survivors when a representative is available, and provides estimated wait times.</li> </ul><h2>Contact Us</h2> <p>If you have any questions, please contact FEMA Office of External Affairs:</p> <ul><li>Congressional Affairs at (202) 646-4500 or at <a href="mailto:FEMA-Congressional-Affairs@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-Congressional-Affairs@fema.dhs.gov</a> </li> <li>Intergovernmental Affairs at (202) 646-3444 or at <a href="mailto:FEMA-IGA@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-IGA@fema.dhs.gov</a></li> <li>Tribal Affairs at (202) 646-3444 or at <a href="mailto:FEMA-Tribal@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-Tribal@fema.dhs.gov</a></li> <li>Private Sector Engagement at (202) 646-3444 or at <a href="mailto:nbeoc@max.gov">nbeoc@max.gov</a></li> </ul><h3>Follow Us</h3> <p>Follow FEMA on social media at: <a href="https://www.fema.gov/blog">FEMA Blog</a> on fema.gov, <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMA">@FEMA</a> or <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMAEspanol">@FEMAEspanol</a> on Twitter, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/FEMA">FEMA</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/FEMAespanol">FEMA Espanol</a> on Facebook, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/fema">@FEMA</a> on Instagram, and via <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/FEMA">FEMA YouTube channel</a>.</p> <p>Also, follow Administrator Deanne Criswell on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMA_Deanne">@FEMA_Deanne</a>.</p> <h3>FEMA Mission</h3> <p>Helping people before, during, and after disasters.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>zella.campbell</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/21/2021 - 14:39</span> Wed, 21 Jul 2021 14:39:45 +0000 zella.campbell 621841 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Red Apple Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5398/20210715/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-red-apple-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Red Apple Fire in Washington </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Red Apple burning in Chelan County, Washington.</p> <p>FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the State of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) on Wednesday, July 14, 2021, at 3:36 p.m. PT. This is the third FMAG declared to help fight Washington wildfires in 2021.</p> <p>At the time of the State’s request, the fire was threatening homes in and around the communities of Cashmere and Wenatchee. The fire also threatened critical communication sites for emergency medical services, law enforcement, and cell phone service in the area in addition to roads, bridges, public utility facilities for Chelan County and Douglas County, and environmental resources including the Swakane wildlife refuge and local hiking trails.  At the time of the State’s request, there were three other large fires burning uncontrolled within the State.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the State’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, an additional $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The <a href="https://www.fema.gov/disaster/disaster-recovery-reform-act-2018">Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018</a> authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/15/2021 - 18:03</span> Thu, 15 Jul 2021 18:03:47 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621678 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Chuweah Creek Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5397/20210714/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-chuweah-creek-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Chuweah Creek Fire in Washington</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Chuweah Creek Fire burning in Washington.</p> <p>In coordination with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the State of Washington submitted a request to FEMA for a <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) declaration for the Chuweah Creek Fire on Monday, July 12, 2021.  FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the State’s request on Tuesday, July 13, 2021, at 6:27 p.m. PT, making it the second FMAG declared to help fight Washington wildfires in 2021.</p> <p>At the time of the State’s request, the fire was threatening homes in and around the community of Nespelem.  The fire was also threatening roads, tribal government buildings, a tribal prison, parks and recreation facilities, farms, utilities, the local watershed, streams and fish spawning sites, as well as locations of cultural significance. These homes and facilities are on tribal land and are under tribal jurisdiction. </p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the State’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, an additional $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 07/14/2021 - 20:04</span> Wed, 14 Jul 2021 20:04:59 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621647 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bootleg Fire in Oregon https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5396/20210712/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-bootleg-fire-oregon <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Bootleg Fire in Oregon</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Bootleg Fire burning in Klamath County, Oregon.</p> <p>FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the State of Oregon’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) on Saturday, July 10, 2021, at 5:22 p.m. PT. This is the second FMAG declared to help fight Oregon wildfires in 2021.</p> <p>At the time of the State’s request, the fire was threatening homes in and around the communities of Sprague River, Bly, and Beatty. The fire also threatened roads, bridges, utilities, infrastructure, recreation and businesses in the area. Oregon continues to experience extreme heat conditions and has burn bans and red flag warnings in place.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the State’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, an additional $584,083 will be available to Oregon through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 07/12/2021 - 18:22</span> Mon, 12 Jul 2021 18:22:38 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621558 at https://www.fema.gov Wildfire Recovery: Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Tops $160 Million https://www.fema.gov/press-release/4562/20210706/wildfire-recovery-federal-assistance-individuals-households-tops-160-m <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Wildfire Recovery: Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Tops $160 Million</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>Salem, Ore.</strong> –<a> It has been 10 months since the 2020 wildfires ravaged communities throughout Oregon. In that time, FEMA, along with its federal partners, has provided more than $160 million to help individuals, homeowners and renters on their road to recovery.</a></p> <p>“We at FEMA, along with our state and federal partners, continue to commit ourselves to helping those affected by the 2020 wildfires,” said Federal Coordinating Officer in charge of recovery, Toney Raines. “Together we have worked diligently to provide grants, low-interest disaster loans and direct temporary housing.”</p> <p><strong>Federal Dollars Help the Recovery Effort</strong></p> <p>As of July 5, 2021, FEMA has provided more than $45.4 million in direct federal assistance that has been approved for individuals and households affected by last year’s wildfires. This includes:</p> <ul><li>More than $29.9 million in housing assistance;</li> <li>More than $7.2 million in other needs assistance;</li> <li>More than $3.8 million through the Crisis Counselling Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs to assist individuals and communities in recovering from the psychological effects of disasters through community-based outreach and educational services; and</li> <li>More than $4.5 million to survivors to help them meet critical needs, such as unemployment assistance, legal services and immediate needs assistance.</li> </ul><p>The U.S. Small Business Administration has approved more than $61 million in low-interest disaster loans to businesses, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners and renters. To date, 561 loans have been approved, with 527 loans direct to homeowners and renters and 34 loans to help businesses get back on their feet.</p> <p><strong>Direct Temporary Housing</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.fema.gov/assistance/individual">FEMA Individual Assistance</a> has also provided direct temporary housing to those survivors who need safe, sanitary and functional housing while they rebuild or find more suitable permanent housing.</p> <p>To date, more than $13.6 million has been spent to mission assign the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to build group housing sites in five eligible counties: Jackson, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion. Sites in Lane and Jackson counties are still under construction. These FEMA group sites help provide additional temporary housing for disaster survivors, in the form of RVs, mobile home units and travel trailers.</p> <p>Currently, units are placed on pads at Madrone Hill, Southern Oregon RV Park, Valley of the Rogue State Park (Jackson County), and sites constructed by USACE for FEMA in Totem Pole (Jackson County), Willow Estates (Jackson County), Mill City (Linn and Marion Counties) and Lincoln City (Lincoln County). In total, FEMA has spent more than $40.6 million in acquiring, installing and maintaining RVs, mobile home units and travel trailers for temporarily house survivors in eligible counties. </p> <p>Also, in a first of its kind program, FEMA and USACE are in the process of restoring fire-damaged mobile home parks in Jackson County to increase availability of temporary housing.</p> <p>The first of these sites, Totem Pole, has already been completed and is providing housing for 26 family households displaced by the disaster. Two other parks, Rogue Valley Mobile Village (Medford) and Coleman Creek (Phoenix) are in construction and should be ready for occupancy later this summer.</p> <p>“Recovery takes time,” said Raines, “and FEMA will be here, boots on the ground, every step of the way.”</p> <p>###</p> <p>Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585). Those who use a Relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should update FEMA with their assigned number for that service. They should be aware phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number. Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish)</p> <p>Disaster survivors affected by the Oregon wildfires and straight-line winds can also get personalized mitigation advice to repair and rebuild safer and stronger from a FEMA Mitigation Specialist. For information on how to rebuild safer and stronger or to inquire as to your new flood risk following a fire near you, email <a href="mailto:FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov">FEMA-R10-MIT@fema.dhs.gov</a>, a FEMA Hazard Mitigation specialist will respond survivor inquiries. When rebuilding check with your local building official and floodplain administrator for guidance.</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMARegion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4562">fema.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA's mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 07/06/2021 - 23:28</span> Tue, 06 Jul 2021 23:28:50 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621397 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Andrus Fire in Washington https://www.fema.gov/press-release/5395/20210706/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-andrus-fire-washington <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight Andrus Fire in Washington </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Andrus Fire burning in Spokane County, Washington.</p> <p>FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the State of Washington’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) on Monday, July 5, 2021, at 9:05 p.m. PT. This is the first FMAG declared to help fight Washington wildfires in 2021.</p> <p>At the time of the State’s request, the fire was threatening homes in and around the city of Cheney. The fire also threatened communication sites, roads, a school, electrical infrastructure, and recreational facilities in the area. Washington continues to experience extreme heat conditions and has burn bans and red flag warnings in place.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the State’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, an additional $778,778 will be available to Washington through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-grant-program-post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###</p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 07/06/2021 - 18:51</span> Tue, 06 Jul 2021 18:51:15 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621393 at https://www.fema.gov Don’t Spark a Fire This Fourth of July -- Celebrate Your Holiday Safely https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210701/dont-spark-fire-fourth-july-celebrate-your-holiday-safely <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Don’t Spark a Fire This Fourth of July -- Celebrate Your Holiday Safely</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – This fire season, FEMA is urging extreme caution with any Fourth of July celebrations that include fireworks, campfires, or grilling. Record-breaking temperatures and drought conditions have increased the fire danger of outdoor recreational activities this summer.</p> <p>Much of the region is currently under red flag warnings and faces the risk of thunderstorms and lightning strikes. Outdoor activities (driving on high grass, camping, grilling) heighten the <a href="https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/summer.html">threat of human-caused wildfires</a>.  While fireworks are an American tradition, they also intensify wildfire danger and can be extremely dangerous in the hands of consumers.</p> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/News-and-Research/Fire-statistics-and-reports/US-Fire-Problem/Fire-causes/osfireworks.pdf">National Fire Protection Association</a>, an estimated 19,500 fires reported to local fire departments in the U.S. in 2018 were started by fireworks. The <a href="https://www.usfa.fema.gov/blog/cb-060319.html">safest way to enjoy fireworks</a> is to attend a display put on by professionals or view a virtual show. Be sure to heed local regulations for firework use.</p> <p>Group holiday gatherings also bring increased chance of exposure to <a href="https://www.ready.gov/pandemic">COVID-19</a>. Follow local guidance for safe outdoor activities as well as recommendations for face coverings and social distancing guidelines.</p> <p>FEMA wishes you a safe and happy holiday weekend.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 07/01/2021 - 20:33</span> Thu, 01 Jul 2021 20:33:34 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 621362 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight 0419 Fire in Oregon https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210630/5394/fema-authorizes-funds-fight-0419-fire-oregon <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Authorizes Funds to Fight 0419 Fire in Oregon</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>.  -  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the 0419 Fire burning in Deschutes County, Oregon, near the City of Redmond.</p> <p>FEMA Region 10 Acting Regional Administrator Vincent Maykovich determined that the fire threatened to cause such destruction as would constitute a major disaster. He approved the State of Oregon’s request for a federal <a href="https://www.fema.gov/fire-management-assistance-grant-program">Fire Management Assistance Grant</a> (FMAG) on Tues. June 29, 2021, at 11 p.m. PT. This is the first FMAG declared in 2021 to help fight Oregon wildfires.</p> <p>At the time of the State’s request, the fire was threatening homes in and around the city of Redmond. The fire also threatened the Redmond Municipal Airport, Central Oregon Community College, as well as local businesses, railroads, and transmission lines in the area. The State of Oregon continues to experience extreme heat conditions and has burn bans and red flag warnings in place.</p> <p>FMAGs are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and are made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials, and supplies. </p> <p>The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the State’s eligible firefighting costs under an approved grant for managing, mitigating, and controlling designated fires. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.</p> <p>With this FMAG authorization, additional funds will be available to Oregon through the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) Post Fire</a> for the mitigation of wildfire and related hazards, such as flood after fire or erosion. Some eligible wildfire project types include defensible space measures, ignition-resistant construction, and hazardous fuels reduction. The Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 authorizes FEMA to provide <a href="https://www.fema.gov/grants/mitigation/post-fire">HMGP Post-Fire</a> funds to eligible states and territories that receive Fire Management Assistance declarations and federally recognized tribes that have land burned within a designated area. </p> <p>###  </p> <p>Follow FEMA Region 10 on <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion10">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/company/fema-region-10">LinkedIn</a> for the latest updates and visit <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/organization/region-10">FEMA.gov</a> for more information.</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em></p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>hannah.weinstein</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 06/30/2021 - 21:41</span> Wed, 30 Jun 2021 21:41:58 +0000 hannah.weinstein 621348 at https://www.fema.gov Two FEMA Region 10 Youth Join 2021-2022 Youth Preparedness Council https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20210616/two-fema-region-10-youth-join-2021-2022-youth-preparedness-council <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Two FEMA Region 10 Youth Join 2021-2022 Youth Preparedness Council</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>BOTHELL, Wash</strong>. – FEMA announced the 2021–2022 Youth Preparedness Council members and two are from FEMA Region 10, Miles Butler of Idaho and Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington. Members are selected based on their dedication to public service, community involvement and their engagement efforts in community resilience throughout the country. FEMA created the council in 2012 to bring together diverse young leaders interested in strengthening disaster preparedness across the nation and within their communities.</p> <p>The council supports FEMA’s commitment to build a culture of preparedness in the United States and provides an avenue to engage young people by considering their perspectives, feedback and opinions. Council members meet with FEMA staff throughout their term to provide input on strategies, initiatives and projects.</p> <p>Miles is excited to engage with other youth, “I want youth to know how easy it is to prepare and how much preparedness could do for them and their families. I always remind myself preparedness saves lives.”  </p> <p>This year, each council member will participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit held virtually in late July. During this annual event, members will participate in online preparedness activities; learn from senior leaders in national preparedness; and engage with FEMA community preparedness staff who offer support and mentorship throughout their term.</p> <p>Shivani is eager for the upcoming summit and to work with teenagers focused on emergency management. “If nothing else, 2020 has shown us that disasters can happen anytime, and we need to be prepared before the next disaster strikes. Preparedness education begins at a young age and creates a future generation of prepared individuals.”</p> <p><strong>The 2021-2022 council members are:</strong></p> <p>Nyl Aziaya of Alabama.</p> <p>Nico Bremeau of California.</p> <p>Isaac Doll of Colorado.</p> <p>Aubrey Dockins of Florida.</p> <p>Miles Butler of Idaho.</p> <p>Devangana Rana of Illinois.</p> <p>Vishnu Iyer of Indiana.</p> <p>Beitris Boyreau-Millar of Maryland.</p> <p>Ranjana Ramesh of Massachusetts.</p> <p>Hunter Tobey of Massachusetts.</p> <p>Amanda Hingorani of Nebraska.</p> <p>Mirika Jambudi of New Jersey.</p> <p>Megan Cameron of New York.</p> <p>Amira Seay of Texas.</p> <p>Shivani Jayaprakasam of Washington.</p> <p>Each year, 15 teens serve on this distinguished council. The next application cycle will open in early 2022. Teens in the eighth through 11th grades may apply online at <a href="https://community.fema.gov/PreparednessCommunity/s/apply-to-ypc">https://community.fema.gov/PreparednessCommunity/s/apply-to-ypc</a></p> <p>To learn more about FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council, visit: <a href="http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council">http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council</a>. </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>mayshaunt.gary</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 06/16/2021 - 17:15</span> Wed, 16 Jun 2021 17:15:47 +0000 mayshaunt.gary 620967 at https://www.fema.gov