https://www.fema.gov/ en FEMA Approves $3.3 Million in Hazard Mitigation Grants for Bay and Jackson Counties https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211123/fema-approves-33-million-hazard-mitigation-grants-bay-and-jackson-counties <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Approves $3.3 Million in Hazard Mitigation Grants for Bay and Jackson Counties</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PENSACOLA, Fla. <strong> — </strong>FEMA has approved two hazard mitigation grants totaling more than $3.3 million to strengthen the resiliency of critical facilities in Bay and Jackson counties following Hurricane Michael.</p> <p>Funding from FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) will provide:</p> <ul><li><strong>Bay County</strong>: $1,953,899 for the installation of redundant fiber optic connections to ensure reliable communications for 93 critical facilities and programs – including 911 radio towers, law enforcement, fire stations and the government administration building – and 126 traffic signals throughout the county to enable efficient traffic flow during the evacuation and return of residents following any disaster. This project will also add fiber optic redundancy to many non-county facilities including Bay District Schools and the city fire and police departments of Lynn Haven, Panama City, Panama City Beach and Springfield.</li> </ul><ul><li><strong>Jackson County</strong>: $1,347,363 to purchase and install permanent diesel generators at 17 critical facilities throughout the county. Installation will include a concrete pad and an automatic transfer switch at each location, which will ensure the continuous delivery of electrical power from either a power company or a generator during future power outages. The permanent generators will be protected from flooding and wind.</li> </ul><p>The HMGP is an important source of federal disaster assistance. Program funding may become available after the president declares a major disaster, with a goal of strengthening communities by improving buildings and critical infrastructure. A 2018 report by the National Institute of Building Sciences found that one dollar spent on hazard mitigation saves more than six dollars of recovery and rebuilding costs.</p> <p>Generally, the HMGP may provide a state, tribe or territory with additional grants up to 15 percent of the total disaster grants awarded by FEMA for a federally declared disaster. States such as Florida that meet advanced mitigation planning criteria may qualify for a higher percentage.</p> <p>Florida has a FEMA-approved Enhanced Mitigation Plan, making the state eligible for HMGP funding not to exceed 20 percent of the estimated total amount of grant money spent by FEMA in the Hurricane Michael disaster. From this amount, the HMGP reimburses the state up to 75 percent of eligible costs for hazard mitigation projects. The remaining amount comes from other sources such as state and local assets and a combination of cash and in-kind sources.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>Kimberly.Kipp</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 11/23/2021 - 15:51</span> Tue, 23 Nov 2021 15:51:35 +0000 Kimberly.Kipp 629122 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Region 4 Announces New Youth Preparedness Council Members https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211118/fema-region-4-announces-new-youth-preparedness-council-members <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Region 4 Announces New Youth Preparedness Council Members</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>ATLANTA – 11 new members are joining the FEMA Region 4 2021-2022 Youth Preparedness Council, a group of high schoolers interested in improving the preparedness and resilience of their communities.</p> <p>Youth Council members were selected based on their community involvement, public service and potential to improve community resilience.</p> <p>“Engaging youth in disaster preparedness empowers them to act as change makers in their community,” said FEMA Region 4 Administrator Gracia Szczech. “They can share the preparedness message with their families and peers, and bring creative, new ideas to their communities to help them prepare for emergencies and disasters.”</p> <p>The Region 4 Youth Preparedness Council cultivates leadership and life skills through a platform for members to share ideas and help build stronger and more resilient communities.</p> <p>Members of the FEMA Region 4 YPC represent seven Southeast states:</p> <ul><li><strong>Matthew Barfield </strong>of Florida</li> <li><strong>Addie Brooks </strong>of Tennessee</li> <li><strong>Peyton Granger </strong>of South Carolina</li> <li><strong>Stella Lee </strong>of Florida</li> <li><strong>Devika Manoj </strong>of Georgia</li> <li><strong>Ja'Shaylee Minor </strong>of Mississippi</li> <li><strong>Saachi Mody </strong>of Florida</li> <li><strong>Ryan Mosley </strong>of Alabama</li> <li><strong>Samuel Rios </strong>of Kentucky</li> <li><strong>Isabella Tarsitano </strong>of Florida</li> <li><strong>Taylor Worbington </strong>of Florida</li> </ul><p>The council is an avenue for FEMA to engage youth and hear their perspectives, feedback and opinions. Members will be mentored by agency staff, to complete a preparedness project.</p> <p>To learn more about youth preparedness, visit <a href="http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness">www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>neily.chapman</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 11/18/2021 - 20:27</span> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 20:27:36 +0000 neily.chapman 628588 at https://www.fema.gov What to Expect in FEMA Home Inspections https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211122/what-expect-fema-home-inspections <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What to Expect in FEMA Home Inspections</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PEARL, Miss. – Individuals and households who live in Amite, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, Pike, Walthall and Wilkinson counties who were affected by Hurricane Ida from Aug. 28 – Sept. 1, 2021 and applied for federal assistance may need to have their homes inspected to verify losses.</p> <p>If you have already begun repairs and replacement, damage should be documented through photos/videos. All receipts for disaster-related purchases should be kept.</p> <p>If you carry homeowners insurance, FEMA may not send an inspector right away. You’ll need to submit insurance documentation to verify your coverage doesn’t meet your disaster-related needs or you have exhausted the Additional Living Expenses provided by the insurance company. FEMA cannot pay for damage covered by insurance or duplicate benefits from another source.</p> <h3>If you apply for FEMA assistance,<strong><em> </em></strong>a home inspector will contact you to schedule an appointment within 1 to 10 days. During that call, write down:</h3> <ul><li>The inspector's name;</li> <li>Date of call;</li> <li>Date and time of appointment; and</li> <li>Inspector’s telephone number.</li> </ul><p>The inspection generally takes 30 to 40 minutes and consists of looking at disaster-damaged areas of your home and reviewing your records. Inspectors can only verify your loss. They do not decide the outcome of your application for disaster assistance nor condemn property. FEMA inspects damaged property for disaster-recovery program purposes only. Inspectors will never ask for money.</p> <h3>The inspector will ask to see:</h3> <ul><li>Photo identification.</li> <li>Proof of ownership/occupancy of damaged residence such as homeowners insurance, a tax bill, mortgage-payment book or utility bill.</li> <li>Insurance documents: homeowners, mobile home, condominium and renters’ policies.</li> <li>List of household occupants living in residence at time of disaster.</li> <li>Disaster-caused damages and disaster-related losses to structural and personal property.</li> </ul><p>Your inspector will have FEMA identification in the form of a badge with a photo. If the inspector does not show you photo identification, do not proceed with the inspection.</p> <h3>FEMA has recently amended the criteria for which Individual Assistance is offered to disaster survivors. These include:</h3> <p>Issuing inspections for applicants that are pending verifications for identity, occupancy, and/or ownership and providing additional support to verify these requirements at the time of inspection and through additional outreach.</p> <ul><li>Providing financial assistance to applicants for the cost of needs (limited to wheelchair ramp, grab bars, and a paved path) due to a disaster-caused disability, when these items were not present in the home before the disaster.</li> <li>Providing financial assistance to repair property damaged by disaster-caused mold growth.</li> </ul><p>You should receive a determination letter with their eligibility decision and the reason for it by regular mail or email, typically on the same day or within 10 days after the inspection.</p> <p>For those who are eligible, the letter states the dollar amount of the grant and how the money must be used. If you disagree with FEMA’s decision, the letter explains how you can appeal the decision.</p> <p>Read your determination letter carefully. FEMA may need additional information or documentation from you — such as an insurance settlement showing you may not have been covered for all your essential needs — before you can be reconsidered for federal assistance.</p> <p>If you have any questions, you can always contact the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362. Persons who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability and use a TTY may call 800-462-7585. If you use 711 or Video Relay Service, call 800-621-3362. Lines are open daily from 6 a.m. to midnight Central Time. Find more details about the FEMA inspection process by visiting <a href="https://www.fema.gov/what-happens-inspection">www.fema.gov/what-happens-inspection</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>ricardo.zuniga</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 11/18/2021 - 17:18</span> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 17:18:23 +0000 ricardo.zuniga 628584 at https://www.fema.gov Houses of Worship in Mississippi May Be Eligible for FEMA Help https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211119/houses-worship-mississippi-may-be-eligible-fema-help <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Houses of Worship in Mississippi May Be Eligible for FEMA Help</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PEARL, Miss.— Qualifying houses of worship in Mississippi may be eligible for FEMA grants to cover hurricane-related expenses.</p> <p>Grants through FEMA’s Public Assistance Program can cover costs to repair or replace facilities damaged during a disaster. The program is primarily funded by FEMA and administered through the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency (MEMA).</p> <p>The Request for Public Assistance (RPA) deadline for Hurricane Ida is Nov. 21, 2021.</p> <p>FEMA defines religious facilities as a church, synagogue, mosque, temple or other house of worship without regard to the religious character of the facility. Help with repairs and replacement costs may be available in counties designated for the FEMA Public Assistance Program: Amite, Claiborne, Copiah, Covington, Franklin, George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Jefferson, Jefferson Davis, Lawrence, Lincoln, Pearl River, Pike, Simpson, Walthall, Wayne, and Wilkinson.</p> <p>To be an eligible, a house of worship must:</p> <ul><li>Be owned or operated by a nonprofit.</li> <li>Have damage caused by Hurricane Ida between Aug. 28 and Sept. 1.</li> <li>Have either not received funding or received insufficient funding after applying for a U.S. Small Business Administration disaster loan to repair or replace a facility.</li> <li>Provide a current ruling letter from the IRS granting tax exemption under Section 501 (c) (d) or (e) of the IRS Code, or provide documentation from the state confirming it is a nonprofit.</li> </ul><p>Houses of worship may contact MEMA for details on how to apply for FEMA assistance. They can get more information or submit their RPA online by visiting <a href="https://www.msema.org/about/public-assistance/">https://www.msema.org/about/public-assistance/</a>.</p> <p><strong>U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans are available for</strong><strong> </strong>certain nonprofits with<strong> <strong>up to $2 million of property damage</strong>.</strong></p> <p>Apply online at <a href="http://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/disaster-assistance.">sba.gov/funding-programs/disaster-assistance.</a> For questions and assistance completing an application, call 800-659-2955 or email <a href="mailto:FOCWAssistance@sba.gov">FOCWAssistance@sba.gov</a>.</p> <p>For the latest information on Hurricane Ida, visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4559">fema.gov/disaster/4626</a> or follow the FEMA Region 4 Twitter account at <a href="https://twitter.com/FEMARegion6">twitter.com/FEMARegion4</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>ricardo.zuniga</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 11/18/2021 - 17:09</span> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 17:09:35 +0000 ricardo.zuniga 628582 at https://www.fema.gov Renters May Be Eligible for Disaster Assistance https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211122/renters-may-be-eligible-disaster-assistance <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Renters May Be Eligible for Disaster Assistance</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PEARL, Miss<strong>. -- </strong>Federal disaster assistance is not just for homeowners. It’s available as well to eligible renters, including students, and can cover essential personal property and other disaster-related expenses such. These may include  temporary housing; replacement or repair of necessary personal property, such as furniture, appliances, clothing, textbooks or school supplies; replacement or repair of tools and other job-related equipment; vehicle repair; and reimbursement of uninsured/out of pocket expenses for medical and dental bills.</p> <p><a>Renters who live in</a> Amite, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, Pike, Walthall and Wilkinson counties and were affected by Hurricane Ida from Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 may apply for FEMA disaster assistance.</p> <p>If you have renter’s insurance, first call your insurance provider to file a claim. Then apply with FEMA. You must provide FEMA with information from your insurance provider, which may include a settlement or denial.</p> <p>FEMA may provide financial assistance to those who were renting before Hurricane Ida so they could temporarily rent a place to live if they are displaced from their primary residence. FEMA rental assistance is intended to cover the monthly rent and cost of essential utilities (i.e., gas, electric and water). FEMA grants may also be used for security deposits but not for telephone, cable or internet service.</p> <p>If you are renting a basement apartment, a room in a house or over the garage, you may still be considered for FEMA assistance. Whether you’re a roommate, cousin or boarder, if you are a tenant who signed a formal rental agreement (or lease) with the owner of the residence before the disaster, and that agreement shows you live in a shared household, you can be considered separately for FEMA disaster assistance.</p> <p>FEMA refers some applicants to the U.S. Small Business Administration, which provides low-interest disaster loans to survivors. Those who do not qualify for an SBA loan are referred to FEMA and are considered for grants from FEMA’s Other Needs Assistance program. SBA loans can help cover repairs not covered by insurance. Renters can apply for loans up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed household contents including clothing, furniture, appliances and other personal property.</p> <p>If you are eligible for an SBA loan, you do not have to accept it. But you are strongly encouraged to complete the application and submit it to SBA.</p> <p>To apply for FEMA assistance:</p> <ul><li>Online, by visiting <a href="http://www.disasterassistance.gov">www.disasterassistance.gov</a>;</li> <li>By downloading the FEMA mobile app to a smartphone or tablet, or</li> <li>By calling the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362. If you use 711 or Video Relay Service, call 800-621-3362. Multi-lingual operators are available. Lines are open from 6 a.m. to midnight CDT seven days a week, and operators can connect you to a specialist who speaks your language. If you use a relay service, captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service.</li> </ul><p>The state has opened Disaster Registration Intake Centers where you can meet face-to-face with state and FEMA staff who can provide information about disaster assistance that may be available to you. The centers will be open through Nov. 13. Hours are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday noon to 4 p.m., closed Sundays.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>Amite County     </em><strong>   </strong>   </strong> The Harrison Building            910 Old McComb Liberty Road Liberty, MS 39645</p> <p><strong>Hancock County        </strong> Hancock Resource Center 454 Highway 90, Suite B Waveland, MS 39576                   </p> <p><strong>Harrison County        </strong> Harrison County Annex Building 9229 Highway 49 Gulfport, MS 39503</p> <p><strong>Pearl River County    </strong> Picayune Safe Room 501 Laurel Street Picayune, MS 39466</p> <p><strong>Pike County </strong>St. Andrews Mission  104 South Front Street McComb, MS 39648</p> <p><strong>Walthall County </strong>Walthall County EMA Office 908 Armory Road Tylertown, MS 39667</p> <p><strong>Wilkinson County    </strong>Wilkinson County EMA Office 1495 U.S. Hwy. 61 South Woodville, MS 39669</p> <p>To apply for an SBA loan, visit SBA’s secure website at <a href="https://DisasterLoanAssistance.sba.gov">https://DisasterLoanAssistance.sba.gov</a>. You can also email <a href="mailto:DisasterCustomerService@SBA.gov">DisasterCustomerService@SBA.gov</a> or call SBA’s Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 for more information.</p> <p>The deadline to apply for FEMA assistance and an SBA loan is the same: Dec. 22, 2021.</p> <p>For the latest on Mississippi Hurricane Ida recovery efforts, visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4626">www.fema.gov/disaster/4626</a>. Follow us on Twitter at <a href="http://twitter.com/femaregion4">twitter.com/femaregion4</a> and<strong> </strong><a href="https://u7061146.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn=TeZUXWpUv-2B6TCY38pVLo9jw1V-2Bo5zjnJlDYvuv2Uss9fUVdD4qLUR5g5P6aeNyAlWOKN_LMDzpl4Nq0l0W7twxHuEzy-2BkxlPg1d7K-2BpAa67OMQF5aA3Z72-2FXM6Bwrk4PgC4ALq-2FN1KZFbq0dIvnjAHIkenOosVeIy4jryNdFhuuVQTvMNeSZQoq3SlT5fPNb9sLEVqccFjBpGLgekSvXV4V4hRGXKdRoDwH7rTrfqYkkwnBGBQ7mTam70ypCa7vTSGgQPx3VU-2BsGnPThHbfDLBkZWFlMiQwx8seofD3qtXHJlJ4IB4EF6LVlCG5HnEzQtAAkMrLOBTy9t4Vb7B3fmmefuNpMnUhT-2Fjwku7Jg2LYMW7EUDxOK70xI4UAjuhp332OxfRqkwLThQXmMBpNL4AL1zHZnUDpnOkYUu-2B-2BxUfTtmne8-3D">www.facebook.com/fema</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>ricardo.zuniga</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 11/18/2021 - 16:53</span> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:53:14 +0000 ricardo.zuniga 628581 at https://www.fema.gov How to File a Successful Appeal for FEMA Assistance https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211110/how-file-successful-appeal-fema-assistance <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">How to File a Successful Appeal for FEMA Assistance</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>NASHVILE, Tenn.— </strong><a><strong>The deadline has passed for residents in Dickson, Hickman, Houston, and Humphreys counties to apply for disaster assistance from FEMA for the Aug. 21 severe storms and flooding, but if survivors don’t agree with the final outcome, they may still appeal. </strong></a></p> <p><strong>To make a successful appeal it is </strong>important to write a letter explaining why you disagree with FEMA’s decision and    to include documentation that supports your claim.</p> <p>Anyone who would like to speak with a FEMA specialist directly about how to file an appeal can always call the FEMA <strong>Helpline at 800-621-3362 or (TTY) 800-462-7585. </strong><a>Lines are open daily from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central Time, seven days a week. If you use a relay service, such as video relay service (VRS), captioned telephone service or others, give FEMA the number for that service.</a></p> <p>Here are some tips to help you file a successful appeal:</p> <p><strong>1. Understand why FEMA deemed your claim ineligible before writing the appeal.</strong></p> <ul><li>You may not agree with it but analyze why FEMA determined your application was ineligible. It could be as simple as a missing document, which you can submit with your appeal. Read FEMA’s letter from beginning to end to completely understand what the agency needs from you.</li> </ul><p><strong>2. Make sure you provide evidence for your appeal. Documentation, depending on your situation, may include: </strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Copy of flood insurance</strong> declaration page.</li> <li><strong>For proof of occupancy</strong>, FEMA accepts an employer statement, lease, utility bill (electric, water/sewer, etc.), bank or credit card statement, phone bill, cable/satellite bill, driver’s license, state-issued identification card, motor vehicle registrations, letters from local schools (public or private), documents from federal or state benefit providers, social service organizations (such as community assistance programs and non-profits), or court documents. <em>All bills and/or statements must be dated within 3 months of the disaster</em>. <ul><li><strong>To prove ownership</strong>, include your mortgage or insurance documents, mortgage payment booklet, tax receipts or a deed. If your documents were lost or destroyed, contact financial, insurance and/or government agencies in your area to see if you can get a replacement. The following website also offers guidance on replacing lost documents: <a href="http://www.usa.gov/replace-vital-documents">http://www.usa.gov/replace-vital-documents</a>.</li> <li><strong>Survivors living in mobile homes or travel trailers</strong> can include a signed statement from a commercial or mobile home park owner.</li> <li><strong>For homes that have been passed down over the generations</strong> without any traditional ownership verification, you may include a public official’s letter or receipts for major repairs or improvements to verify ownership.</li> <li><strong>As a last resort,</strong> and only after all other options have been exhausted, FEMA may accept a written document in which you declare yourself the owner of property. The letter does not need to be notarized, but it must match the information on your FEMA application.  </li> </ul></li> </ul><p><strong>3. Can’t write the appeal yourself? Have someone write it for you.</strong></p> <ul><li>If you are the applicant and are unable to write an appeal letter yourself, ask someone to write it for you. Consider asking a family member, friend or a lawyer.</li> <li>Residents may also get assistance for appeals from free legal disaster assistance by calling <strong>844-HELP4TN (844-435-7486) </strong>or online at <a href="https://tn.freelegalanswers.org/">https://tn.freelegalanswers.org/</a>. Additionally, survivors can access information about their rights and resources, including links to upcoming legal clinics, and local resources at <a href="https://www.help4tn.org/">https://www.help4tn.org/</a></li> </ul><p><strong>4. Know your deadline.</strong></p> <ul><li>You have <strong>60 days</strong> from the date of your FEMA determination letter to appeal. Circle the deadline on your calendar or write yourself a note to keep the date in the forefront. Once FEMA reviews your letter, you may receive a phone call or a follow-up letter asking for more documentation.</li> </ul><p><strong>5. Don’t forget to sign your appeal letter. And when you’re ready, there are three ways to submit your appeal:</strong></p> <ul><li>Fax it to 800-827-8112</li> <li>Send it by mail to FEMA National Processing Service Center, P.O. Box 10055, Hyattsville, MD 20782-8055</li> <li>Upload documents to your disasterassistance.gov account.</li> </ul><p><strong>6. Include your application number on every page of the documents you submit.</strong></p> <p><strong>7</strong><strong>. Expect a decision letter to your appeal within 90 days.</strong></p> <p>For more information on Tennessee’s disaster recovery, visit <a href="https://www.tn.gov/tema.html">www.tn.gov/tema.html</a> and <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4609">www.fema.gov/disaster/4609</a>. You may also follow FEMA on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/fema">www.facebook.com/fema</a> and Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion4">@FEMARegion4</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>felicia.jordan</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 11/10/2021 - 20:16</span> Wed, 10 Nov 2021 20:16:05 +0000 felicia.jordan 628260 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Approves Nearly $5.6 Million More for Lynn Haven Parks Recovery https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211110/fema-approves-nearly-56-million-more-lynn-haven-parks-recovery <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Approves Nearly $5.6 Million More for Lynn Haven Parks Recovery</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PENSACOLA, Fla. — FEMA has approved an additional $5,598,399 for the state of Florida to reimburse the city of Lynn Haven for its continuing permanent repairs to five city parks and sports complex after Hurricane Michael in 2018. </p> <p>Funding from FEMA's Public Assistance grant program will be used for the repairs at A.L. Kinsaul Park, Cain Griffin Park, James E. Rogers Park, Leslie Porter Park, Monument Park and the Lynn Haven Sports Complex.</p> <p>Repairs will be made to beach and dog parks, splash parks, basketball and tennis courts, ballfields, concession stands, restrooms, pavilions, pedestrian trails and bridges, playgrounds and parking lots to restore them to their pre-disaster design, function and capacity. </p> <p>This reimbursement brings the total of FEMA grants to the city for Hurricane Michael recovery to $40.9 million.</p> <p>FEMA’s Public Assistance program is an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) works with FEMA during all phases of the program and reviews projects prior to FEMA final approval.</p> <p>Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop projects and scopes of work. FEMA obligates funding for projects to FDEM after final approval.</p> <p>Once a project is obligated, FDEM works closely with applicants to finalize grants and begin making payments. FDEM has procedures in place designed to ensure grant funding is provided to local communities as quickly as possible.</p> <p>FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations, including houses of worship, so communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>Kimberly.Kipp</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 11/10/2021 - 20:15</span> Wed, 10 Nov 2021 20:15:07 +0000 Kimberly.Kipp 628259 at https://www.fema.gov FEMA Approves Additional $1 Million Grant for Escambia County Debris Removal https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211109/fema-approves-additional-1-million-grant-escambia-county-debris-removal <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">FEMA Approves Additional $1 Million Grant for Escambia County Debris Removal </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>PENSACOLA, Fla. — FEMA has approved a grant of $1,016,712 for the state of Florida to reimburse Escambia County for the costs of its county-wide debris removal after Hurricane Sally.</p> <p>Escambia County employees collected and removed an additional 19,436 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 1,589 tons of construction and demolition debris from public roads and rights of way between Nov. 21, 2020 and Feb. 18, 2021, removing any of the remaining threat to public health and safety. <a> </a></p> <p>The grant is awarded through FEMA’s Public Assistance program is an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) works with FEMA during all phases of the program and reviews projects prior to FEMA final approval.</p> <p>Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop projects and scopes of work. FEMA obligates funding for projects to FDEM after final approval.</p> <p>Once a project is obligated, FDEM works closely with applicants to finalize grants and begin making payments. FDEM has procedures in place designed to ensure grant funding is provided to local communities as quickly as possible.</p> <p>FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal and local governments, and certain private nonprofit organizations, including houses of worship, so communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>Kimberly.Kipp</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 11/09/2021 - 20:24</span> Tue, 09 Nov 2021 20:24:39 +0000 Kimberly.Kipp 628221 at https://www.fema.gov State, FEMA Continue Recovery Work in Western North Carolina https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211109/state-fema-continue-recovery-work-western-north-carolina <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">State, FEMA Continue Recovery Work in Western North Carolina</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h3><a>State, FEMA Continue Recovery Work in Western North Carolina</a></h3> <p><strong>WAYNESVILLE, N.C</strong>. – The deadline for individuals and households to apply for FEMA disaster assistance has passed, but work continues to support Western North Carolina’s recovery from Tropical Storm Fred.</p> <p>Survivors in Buncombe, Haywood and Transylvania counties who registered with FEMA can check the status of their applications, ask questions and get information in several ways:</p> <ul><li>Visit FEMA’s website at <a href="///C:/Users/emcknigh/AppData/Local/Microsoft/Windows/INetCache/Content.Outlook/ZRDBE163/DisasterAssistance.gov">DisasterAssistance.gov</a></li> <li>Use the <a href="https://www.fema.gov/about/news-multimedia/mobile-app-text-messages">FEMA App</a> for smartphones</li> <li>Call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 (800-462-7585 TTY). Multilingual operators are available. Those who use a relay service such as a videophone, InnoCaption or CapTel should provide FEMA with their specific phone number assigned to that service.</li> </ul><p>Survivors who were unable to register before the Nov. 8 deadline and who can provide justification for late registration may contact FEMA and request consideration to apply.</p> <p>Two months after the major disaster declaration, more than $18 million in federal grants, loans and flood insurance payments have been approved for homeowners, renters and businesses in Buncombe, Haywood and Transylvania counties. This includes:</p> <ul><li>$3.18 million in FEMA grants for 673 individuals and households.</li> <li>$3.5 million in disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration for businesses, homeowners and renters.</li> <li>$11.8 million in National Flood Insurance Program claims paid to policyholders.</li> </ul><p>FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance Teams went door-to door in Buncombe, Haywood and Transylvania counties conducting outreach to 2,600 homes and making contact with 2,000 individuals to offer help with registration and provide referrals to address unmet needs.</p> <p>FEMA continues to coordinate with the State of North Carolina on reimbursement for emergency services, debris removal, repair or replacement of damaged public infrastructure and funding to mitigate against losses from future storms.</p> <p>For more information about  Tropical Storm Fred recovery in North Carolina, visit <a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/www.fema.gov/disaster/4617__;!!HYmSToo!Oj-3DlI4re-rPmhE3_taccVFMFlRJZ8S201YfaZMHlP-lKKv1AWg6tUMGsLL9pEG_6o$">fema.gov/disaster/4617</a> and <a href="http://www.ncdps.gov/TSFred">ncdps.gov/TSFred</a>. Follow us on Twitter: <a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/twitter.com/ncemergency__;!!HYmSToo!Oj-3DlI4re-rPmhE3_taccVFMFlRJZ8S201YfaZMHlP-lKKv1AWg6tUMGsLLLjxYSJM$">@NCEmergency </a>and <a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https:/twitter.com/FEMAregion4__;!!HYmSToo!Oj-3DlI4re-rPmhE3_taccVFMFlRJZ8S201YfaZMHlP-lKKv1AWg6tUMGsLLZxIW3Bg$">@FEMARegion4</a>.</p> <p>###</p> <p><em>FEMA’s mission is helping people before, during, and after disasters.</em> </p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>brianasummer.fenton</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 11/09/2021 - 19:01</span> Tue, 09 Nov 2021 19:01:06 +0000 brianasummer.fenton 628215 at https://www.fema.gov Tips for Storm Survivors to Avoid Contractor Fraud https://www.fema.gov/press-release/20211101/tips-storm-survivors-avoid-contractor-fraud <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Tips for Storm Survivors to Avoid Contractor Fraud </span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>NASHVILLE, Tenn.</strong>  – With many residents in Middle Tennessee repairing and rebuilding their properties after damage from the August storms and flooding, federal and state recovery officials encourage those hiring a contractor to be aware of fraud. Disasters bring out fraudsters and con artists, many of whom claim to be affiliated with FEMA when they’re not. FEMA does not certify contractors.</p> <p><strong>Other tips to keep in mind when hiring a contractor:</strong></p> <ul><li><strong>Do your research.</strong> Scam artists will usually come to you to offer their services — either at your door, on the phone or through email — so be especially wary of solicitors. <ul><li><strong>Don’t offer personal financial information over the phone</strong>. Know who you are dealing with and always ask for identification.</li> <li><strong>Get estimates from multiple contractors</strong> and your insurance company. Reject any offer that seems too good to be true.</li> <li><strong>Ask for references from past customers.</strong></li> <li><strong>Use the Better Business Bureau, </strong><a href="http://www.bbb.org/"><strong>www.bbb.org</strong></a><strong>, and internet search engines.</strong> Fraudulent firms change names frequently, so search the web for their address and phone number, and include terms like “review,” “scam” and “complaint”.</li> <li><strong>Verify insurance.</strong> Contractors should have disability and workers' compensation insurance. If they don’t, you may be liable for accidents on your property.</li> <li><strong>Make sure contractors have the proper licensing</strong> and are bonded.</li> <li><strong>Ensure contractors obtain the necessary permits</strong> to do the job.</li> <li><strong>Demand satisfaction.</strong> Don’t sign completion papers or make final payment until the work is done correctly.</li> </ul></li> <li><strong>Don’t wire money or use reloadable debit or gift cards.</strong> There is no legitimate reason to use this form of payment.</li> <li><strong>Get agreements in writing.</strong> Read the contract carefully, and if you don’t understand every word, take it to an expert. Never sign a contract with blank spaces to be filled in.  <ul><li>Make sure the contract details all work to be performed, the costs, projected completion date and how to negotiate changes and settle disputes.</li> </ul></li> <li><strong>Take a picture </strong>of your contractor, their vehicle and license plate and/or the contractor’s business card and driver’s license.</li> <li><strong>Report your concerns</strong>. Potential fraud should be reported to your local law enforcement agency. You can also visit the Tennessee Dept. of Commerce and Insurance and file an online complaint form <a href="https://www.tn.gov/commerce/resources-services/file-a-complaint.html">File a Complaint (tn.gov)</a> or call the free <strong>FEMA Disaster Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721</strong> available 24-hours a day.</li> </ul><p>For more information on Tennessee’s disaster recovery, <a>visit </a><a href="https://www.tn.gov/tema.html">www.tn.gov/tema.html</a> and <a href="http://www.fema.gov/disaster/4609">www.fema.gov/disaster/4609</a>. You may also follow FEMA on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/fema">www.facebook.com/fema</a> and Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/femaregion4">@FEMARegion4</a>.</p></div> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span>felicia.jordan</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 11/01/2021 - 20:16</span> Mon, 01 Nov 2021 20:16:19 +0000 felicia.jordan 628010 at https://www.fema.gov