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FEMA Awards South Florida Communities Nearly $25.7 Million for Hurricane Irma Expenses

Release date: 
October 15, 2019
Release Number: 
NR 394

ORLANDO, Fla. - FEMA has approved $25,697,214 for the State of Florida to help numerous south Florida communities defray the costs of responding to and cleaning up from Hurricane Irma under FEMA's Public Assistance Program.

The grants consist of:

  •  $1,319,909 to reimburse the City of Deerfield Beach for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017 following the September 2017 storm. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 54,492 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 3,339 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed 2 damaged trees and 791 hanging limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $1,746,147 to reimburse the City of Hialeah for staff overtime and emergency measures enacted between Sept. 4 and Oct. 3, 2017. During that time period, city workers and first responders set up and staffed an emergency operations center; performed evacuations; barricaded streets blocked by downed electric lines and debris; and set up emergency generators around the city.
  •  $1,371,754 to reimburse the City of Homestead for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the city between Oct. 18 and Dec. 16, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 25,921 cubic yards of mixed debris. This included removing 599 damaged trees and hanging limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $3,772,810 to reimburse the City of Miramar for the collection, reduction, and disposal and of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Dec. 16, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away an estimated 353,597 cubic yards of vegetative debris and construction/demolition debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed an estimated 617 hanging tree limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $1,087,811 to reimburse the City of North Lauderdale for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, contractors gathered and hauled away more than 80,000 cubic yards of vegetative debris and from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed damaged trees and hanging tree limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $3,243,311 to reimburse the City of North Miami for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Dec. 16, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 105,877 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 15,397 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed 6 damaged trees and 4,804 hanging limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $1,114,600 to reimburse the City of Parkland for the collection, reduction, and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 89,310 cubic yards of vegetative debris from roads and public property landfill disposal.
  •  $2,624,837 to reimburse the City of Pompano Beach for the collection, reduction, and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 149,819 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 37,519 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal.
  •  $1,204,936 to reimburse the City of Sunrise for first responder and city worker overtime and emergency measures enacted between Sept. 7, and Sept. 12, 2017. During that time period, steps were taken to provide additional security and patrols for residential areas and barricade roads due to dangerous conditions. In addition, support was provided to keep city wastewater systems operational and an Emergency Operations Center set up and staffed.
  •  $1,947,156 to reimburse the City of Sunrise for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, contractors gathered and hauled away 102,249 cubic yards of vegetative debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed 251 damaged trees and 3,594 hanging limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $1,084,966 to reimburse the City of Tamarac for the collection, reduction, and disposal of debris within the city between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, city workers and contractors gathered and hauled away 50,661 cubic yards of vegetative debris and 7,529 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris from roads and public property for landfill disposal. They also removed 77 damaged trees and 2,224 hanging limbs that were determined to pose a threat to public health and safety.
  •  $3,988,525 to reimburse the Village of Islamorada for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout the village between Oct. 18, 2017 and March 10, 2018. During that time period, contractors gathered and hauled away 16,419 cubic yards of vegetative debris, 27,423 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris and 653 cubic yards of sand from roads and public property for landfill disposal.
  •  $1,190,452 to reimburse the Village of Key Biscayne for the collection, reduction and disposal of debris throughout Key Biscayne between Sept. 18 and Oct. 17, 2017. During that time period, contractors gathered and hauled away 47,033 cubic yards of vegetative debris, 3,022 cubic yards of construction/demolition debris and 72 cubic yards of sand from roads and public property for landfill disposal.

Funding for this Public Assistance (PA) project is authorized under Sections 403 of the Robert T. Stafford Act for Florida to cover Hurricane Irma-related expenses, reimbursing eligible applicants for the cost of debris removal; life-saving emergency protective measures; and the repair, replacement or restoration of disaster-damaged facilities like buildings, roads and utilities.

FEMA's Public Assistance grant program is an essential source of funding for communities recovering from a federally declared disaster or emergency. The Florida Division of Emergency Management works with FEMA during all phases of the PA program and conducts final reviews of FEMA-approved projects.

Applicants work directly with FEMA to develop project worksheets and scopes of work. Following approvals by FEMA and FDEM, FEMA obligates funding for the project.

FEMA's Public Assistance program provides grants to state, tribal, and local governments, and certain types of private non-profit organizations including some houses of worship, so that communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies.

The federal share for Public Assistance projects is not less than 75 percent of the eligible cost. The state determines how the non-federal share of the cost of a project (up to 25 percent) is split with the sub-recipients like local and county governments.

Last Updated: 
October 15, 2019 - 14:28