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FEMA Media Library

Seismic Retrofit Incentive Programs: A Handbook for Local Governments (FEMA 254 1994)

This handbook assists local government officials in developing seismic retrofit incentive programs. The handbook summarizes several case studies that describe the steps that seven California cities have taken to promote and implement retrofitting in their communities. Included are sections on using zoning as an incentive to retrofit; local government finance options; a description of the Unreinforced Masonry Buildings (URM) law and of recent legislation; and liability implications and considerations in the event of an earthquake.

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Earthquake Resistant Construction of Gas and Liquid Fuel Pipeline Systems Serving or Regulated by the Federal Government (FEMA 233 1992)

This report summarizes the vulnerability of gas and liquid fuel pipeline systems to damage in past earthquakes. The report lists the available standards and technologies that can protect such facilities against earthquake damage. An overview of measures taken by various federal agencies to protect pipeline systems is presented. The appendix presents summaries of statements made by representatives of federal agencies and other organizations contacted during the study.

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FEMA 156, Typical Costs for Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings. Volume 1: Summary. Second Edition.

This publication provides a methodology to estimate the costs of seismic rehabilitation projects at various locations in the United States. This edition is based on a sample of almost 2,100 projects, with data collected using a standard protocol, strict quality control verification, and a reliability rating. A sophisticated statistical methodology applied to this database yields cost estimates of increasing quality and reliability as more and more detailed information on the building inventory is used in the estimation process. Guidance is also provided to calculate the range of uncertainty associated with this process.

The compressed file contains the PDF file and a text file for use with screen readers.

Creating a Seismic Safety Advisory Board: A Guide to Earthquake Risk Management (FEMA 266 1995)

This guide assists states, state coalitions, and local governments in creating, developing, and nurturing seismic safety advisory boards. The guide provides information on board operations, including staffing and funding a board, and guidelines for strategic planning and developing a model seismic risk management program to measure progress. The appendices include model executive orders, enabling legislation, staff duty descriptions, workshop designs, and workshop rosters; examples of an interstate compact, articles of incorporation, and corporate bylaws; a list of existing seismic safety advisory boards; and a lexicon of terms.

The compressed file contains the PDF file and a text file for use with screen readers.

Seismic Considerations for Communities at Risk (FEMA 83 1995)

This publication is a companion volume to the 1994 edition of NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings. The publication provides individuals and community decision-makers with information to assess seismic risk, make informed decisions about seismic safety in their communities, and determine what can be done to mitigate risk. The publication includes information on the scope of earthquake risk in the U.S., the effects of earthquakes on buildings, how design can reduce earthquake effects, and the importance of seismic codes and the NEHRP Provisions. Also included are factors to consider when deciding whether and how to take action to reduce earthquake risk and suggestions for stimulating community action.

The compressed file contains the PDF document and a text file for use with screen readers.

Quick Reference Guide: Comparison of Select NFIP & Building Code Requirements for Special Flood Hazard Areas (2012)

This guide illustrates the similarities and highlights the differences between the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) minimum requirements and the requirements of the 2012 International Codes® (I-Codes®) and ASCE 24-05, Flood Resistant Design and Construction, a standard referenced by the I-Codes. The illustrations highlight some of the key similarities and differences between foundation types, lowest floor elevations, enclosures below elevated buildings and utilities requirements contained within the NFIP and I-Codes for most residential and commercial buildings (classified as "Category II" structures by the building codes).

Feb 28, 2017 - Available Flood Hazard Information for the State of New Mexico

This table includes the sources and locations of the flood hazard information available for New Mexico as of February 28, 2017, sorted by county and community.

May 31, 2017 - Available Flood Hazard Information for the State of New Mexico

This table includes the sources and locations of the flood hazard information available for New Mexico as of May 31, 2017, sorted by county and community.

Aug 31, 2017 - Available Flood Hazard Information Table for the State of New Mexico

This table includes the sources and locations of the flood hazard information available for New Mexico as of August 31, 2017, sorted by county and community.

Nov 30, 2017 - Available Flood Hazard Information for the State of New Mexico

This table includes the sources and locations of the flood hazard information available for New Mexico as of November 30, 2017, sorted by county and community.

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