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Hazard Mitigation Assistance (8)

Hazard Mitigation Assistance - Collection of documents
Collection Created:
February 13, 2017
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  • Environmental Assessment St. Charles Parish Magnolia Ridge Pump Station HMGP-DR-4080-LA Project #3.

    On August 29, 2012, Hurricane Isaac made landfall in the State of Louisiana as a Category 1 storm, causing high winds, extensive storm surge, and inland flooding over southern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana, which received greater than 20 inches of rain, producing both flash flooding and river flooding. Hurricane Isaac was declared a major disaster event, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 4080, and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding was made available to affected areas.

    Subsequently, St. Charles Parish submitted an HMGP application for funding to construct the Magnolia Ridge Pump Station, a 500 cubic feet per second (cfs) pump station that will be located in Boutte, Louisiana. The pump station will mitigate the risk of flooding of structures and streets during heavy rainfall and tidal surge events in the Magnolia Ridge watershed area which encompasses portions of Boutte and Paradis. During heavy rainfall and tidal surge events, this area experiences flooding of structures and streets. Currently, there are 231 residences, 41 businesses, 2 public buildings, and 25 school/hospital/church buildings within the AE Flood Zone watershed area, which encompasses parts of Boutte and Paradis, Louisiana. The proposed pump station will be located at the southernmost point in the watershed area in Boutte at coordinates 29.862917 Latitude and -90.409203 Longitude. The site of the proposed pump station is on land currently owned by St. Charles Parish. Site photographs are in Appendix A and location maps are in Appendix B.

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the President’s Council on Environmental Quality regulations to implement NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 1500-1508), and FEMA’s regulations implementing NEPA (44 CFR Part 10). FEMA is required to consider potential environmental impacts before funding or approving actions and projects. The purpose of this EA is to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Magnolia Ridge Pump Station. FEMA will use the findings in this EA to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

    This draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Clarifying the Additional 5 Percent Initiative

    The Additional 5 percent Initiative is funding that has been set aside to help communities enhance disaster resilience related to building codes, such as adopting the current International Building Code® and improving a community’s Building Code Effectiveness Grading Schedule (BCEGS) score.

  • Site-Specific Environmental Assessment Vermilion Parish Abbeville General Hospital Safe Room Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    Vermilion Parish has applied for Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding through the Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness under application number HMGP-DR-1786-LA Project #160. These funds are made available as a result of the federal disaster declaration that followed the landfall of Hurricane Gustav in September 2008. Wind damage was significant in areas from the south-central coast of Louisiana through greater Baton Rouge with this hurricane. Power was knocked out for days, some areas longer, across this region, with numerous trees down and other related wind damage. Tornadoes were reported in St. Tammany and Jefferson Parishes with several structures being damaged. Storm surge was a significant problem in parts of coastal Louisiana and along tidal lakes and rivers as Gustav moved onshore. Heavy rainfall affected parts of the state as well, including West Baton Rouge, Orleans, St. Tammany, and Vermilion Parishes.

    Section 404 (HMGP) of the Robert T. Stafford Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. § 5170c, authorizes FEMA to provide funding to eligible grant applicants for cost effective activities that have the purpose of reducing or eliminating risks to life and property from hazards and their effects. Mitigation grant program regulations and guidance that implement these authorities identify various types of hazard mitigation projects or activities that meet this purpose and may be eligible for funding. These projects represent a range of activities that protect structures, the contents within those structures, and/or the lives of their occupants.

    The purpose of the proposed project is to provide near-absolute life safety protection for the hospital personal and patients that cannot be relocated prior to, during, and after a hurricane event. Vermilion Parish Abbeville General Hospital’s (AGH) ability to safely house and protect their personal and patients will prevent a lapse in the availability of medical services and will ensure the overall health of the community can be effectively managed during and immediately after an event. The city of Abbeville is located northeast within the parish along a main access road, Highway 14. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the population of Abbeville is 12,446 (2014 estimate), and the Vermilion Parish population is 59,875 (2015 estimate).The Vermilion Parish Hazard Mitigation Plan (VPHMP) (March 2011) identifies hurricanes/tropical storms as one of the more frequent hazards for the parish. As such, safe rooms for critical facilities are identified in the action plan. There have been 15 hurricane/tropical storms affecting the area since 1957, according to VPHMP submitted with the application.

    This draft SEA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Environmental Assessment Lomitas Negras Arroyo Stabilization Project Rio Rancho, Sandoval County, New Mexico Southern Sandoval County Arroyo Flood Control Authority

    Draft Environmental Assessment Lomitas Negras Arroyo Stabilization Project Rio Rancho, Sandoval County, New Mexico Southern Sandoval County Arroyo Flood Control Authority

    HMGP DR‐4079‐NM, Project #11

    January 2017

    The Southern Sandoval County Arroyo Flood Control Authority (SSCAFCA) proposes to construct an off‐channel detention pond and bank stabilization features in the Arroyo de las Lomitas Negras to protect adjacent and downstream properties from flood and erosion damage, as well as reduce sediment deposition in downstream facilities. The project area is located in Rio Rancho, Sandoval County, New Mexico. It appears on the Loma Machete and Bernalillo, New Mexico US Geological Survey 7.5‐minute quadrangle maps.

    The nature of flood events in southern Sandoval County, New Mexico, which includes the City of Rio Rancho, is characterized by intense, short‐lived thunderstorms. These storms drop significant amounts of rainfall in a very short time, creating a surge of stormwater that flows in the arroyos or drainage ditches downstream toward the Rio Grande. As this area of New Mexico is semi‐arid, the soils in southern Sandoval County are generally highly erodible. Runoff from storm events can rapidly result in localized flooding and erode large segments of arroyo bank.

    When Rio Rancho was first platted in the 1960s, there were very few locations where sufficient property was retained in the public domain for the conveyance of stormwater. Consequently, residential and commercial properties have been impacted by large flows and erosion of watercourses. In developed areas of the city, this can result in damage to structures and other property, as well as pose a threat to the safety of inhabitants.

    In 2006, a large storm event occurred in the watershed, which resulted in overtopping of Saratoga Road and damage to the infrastructure associated with this roadway. Additionally, during the 2006 storm, localized flooding occurred at Enchanted Hills Elementary School and impacted New Mexico Highway 528 (NM 528), a significant arterial roadway.

    The project is designed to provide increased flood protection and reduce potential for damage to downstream areas where existing public infrastructure and residential development occur. Such areas are prone to damage by high flows and bank erosion resulting from storm events.

    This draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations

  • Benefit Cost Toolkit Version 5.3

    The Benefit Cost Tool Version 5.3 is used to perform benefit cost analysis for applications submitted under FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grant Programs. To use this tool you must first download the compressed file on this page, extract and save the file in one folder on your computer. While the program is installing, additional file sets will be downloaded from the internet. Make sure to maintain access to the internet until the program is fully installed. If you have any questions about the new BCA software program, please contact the BC Helpline at bchelpline@dhs.gov or at 1-855-540-6744. 

  • Hazard Mitigation Assistance Acquisition Process Frequently Asked Questions

    This document provides general information on the Hazard Mitigation Assistance acquisition process.

  • FY 2017 Mitigation Grant Application Cycle - Lessons Learned and Best Practices for Application Development

    This 90-minute webinar reviewed lessons learned and best practices identified during the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 mitigation grant cycle to assist in the development of applications for the FY 2017 Grant Cycle. It presented an overview of the results of the FY 2016 mitigation grant cycle, with a focus on common issues and best practices identified across all project types with an in-depth walk through of the innovative Drought and Flood Mitigation Projects (Green Infrastructure, Aquifer Storage and Recovery, Flood Diversion and Storage, and Floodplain and Stream Restoration).

  • 2018 Hazard Mitigation Workshop Tools

    These documents are useful tools for interested workshop attendees and presenters to prepare for the 2018 Hazard Mitigation Stakeholder Workshop.