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Hurricane Katrina - Louisiana (40)

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Declared: 08/29/2005
Collection Created:
September 20, 2013
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  • Record of Environmental Consideration

    Record of Environmental Consideration
  • Alternative Arrangements Records of Consideration

    Alternative Arrangements Records of Consideration
  • Alternative Arrangement Record of Environmental Consideration

    Alternative Arrangement Record of Environmental Consideration
  • Audubon Nature Center (ANC) New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana FEMA-DR-1603-LA October 2014

    Audubon Nature Center (ANC) New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana FEMA-DR-1603-LA October 2014///On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge well above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama Gulf Coasts. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the state of Louisiana due to damages from Hurricane Katrina and signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Program to repair, restore, and replace state and local government and certain Private Nonprofit facilities damaged as a result of the declared event./This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • State of Louisiana, Office of Facility Planning and Control Northshore Technical Community College St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

    State of Louisiana, Office of Facility Planning and Control Northshore Technical Community College St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

    Northshore Technical Community College (NTCC) was formerly located at 1000 Canulette Road, Slidell, Louisiana 70458. The campus facility is owned by the State of Louisiana, Office of Facility Planning and Control (FP&C) and is not presently in use, having been made safe and secure after Hurricane Katrina. NTCC, the tenant of FP&C, has determined that their needs would best be served by moving this facility to a new location. With FP&C’s concurrence, NTCC proposes to relocate to a 12.6-acre site within a currently undeveloped 41-acre tract owned by St. Tammany Parish. The new NTCC campus would consist of a 22,800 square-foot, single story building housing the functions that were distributed among the various buildings of the former Slidell location. There also would be parking as required by St. Tammany Parish Code. No change in function is proposed. The new facility would be sited at 65726 Highway 434, Lacombe, Louisiana 70445. An additional 185-acre tract located across Highway 434 from the project area would be acquired by St. Tammany Parish to accommodate stormwater detention. Only the NTCC project budget is being funded by FEMA.

    This Public Notice has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Southern University of New Orleans Park Campus construction of five buildings, New Orleans LA DR-1603-LA December 2014

    Southern University of New Orleans Park Campus Construction of Five (5) Buildings New Orleans, LA DR-1603-LA December 2014///Hurricane Katrina, a Category three (3) hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama Gulf Coasts on August 29, 2005. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the state of Louisiana due to damages from Hurricane Katrina and signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Program to repair, restore, and replace state and local government and certain private nonprofit facilities damaged as a result of the declared event./This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Facility Planning & Control: New Orleans City Park Golf Complex Orleans Parish FEMA-1603-DR-LA

    Facility Planning & Control: New Orleans City Park Golf Complex Orleans Parish FEMA-1603-DR-LA///Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005 near the town of Buras, Louisiana with sustained winds of more than 125 mph. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide Federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. This is pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance Program (PA) to assist in funding the repair, restoration, reconstruction, or replacement of public facilities damaged as a result of the declared disaster./This Final EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Plaquemines Parish Lake Hermitage Road Elevation Plaquemines Parish Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Project Number 1603-0419 Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana May 2015

    Draft Environmental Assessment Plaquemines Parish Lake Hermitage Road Elevation Plaquemines Parish Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Project Number 1603-0419 Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana May 2015

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama gulf coasts on August 29, 2005. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. President Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana due to damages from Hurricane Katrina and signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA' s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) to provide funds to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration.

    This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Construction of Drainage Improvements for Palmisano Blvd., Plaza Drive and 20 Arpent Bridge St. Bernard, Louisiana HMGP 1603-087-0011 Project number 1603-0418 FEMA-1603-DR-LA May 2015

    Environmental Assessment Construction of Drainage Improvements for Palmisano Blvd., Plaza Drive and 20 Arpent Bridge St. Bernard, Louisiana HMGP 1603-087-0011 Project number 1603-0418 FEMA-1603-DR-LA May 2015

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama gulf coasts on August 29, 2005. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour (mph). President George W. Bush signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) for the state of Louisiana on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 404 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Program (HMGP) to provide funds to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration.

    This Final EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment Louisiana National Guard Camp Villere State Military Pilot Reconstruction, Slidell, Louisiana St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana Hazard Mitigation Grant Program FEMA Project Number 1603-0261 July 2015

    Draft Environmental Assessment Louisiana National Guard Camp Villere State Military Pilot Reconstruction, Slidell, Louisiana St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana Hazard Mitigation Grant Program FEMA Project Number 1603-0261 July 2015

    In accordance with 44 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Subpart B – Agency Implementing Procedures, Section 10.9, an Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). The EA determines if the proposed pilot reconstruction of a new residential structure at Camp Villere, in Slidell, Louisiana would have the potential for significant adverse effects on the quality of the human and natural environment. The results of this EA will be used to make a decision whether to initiate preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or to prepare a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

    This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment City of New Orleans: Gert Town Pool (Natatorium) Relocation Orleans Parish FEMA-1603-DR-LA New Orleans, Louisiana July 2015

    Draft Environmental Assessment City of New Orleans: Gert Town Pool (Natatorium) Relocation Orleans Parish FEMA-1603-DR-LA New Orleans, Louisiana July 2015

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005 near the town of Buras, Louisiana with sustained winds of more than 125 mph. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide Federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. This is pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended.

    This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment Burden Center Infrastructure Improvements LSU AgCenter – State of Louisiana, Office of Facility Planning and Control FEMA-1603-DR-LA Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana August 2015

    Draft Environmental Assessment Burden Center Infrastructure Improvements LSU AgCenter – State of Louisiana, Office of Facility Planning and Control FEMA-1603-DR-LA Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana August 2015

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on 29 August 2005, near the town of Buras, Louisiana, with sustained winds of more than 125 miles per hour. The accompanying storm surge caused extensive flooding throughout most of the Louisiana coastal zone. In addition, high winds, wind-blown debris, and wind-driven rain damaged a significant number of facilities, both within the coastal zone and farther inland, including many within Baton Rouge.

    This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment DPW Field Offices at Genois City of New Orleans FEMA-1603-DR-LA New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana August 2015

    Draft Environmental Assessment DPW Field Offices at Genois City of New Orleans FEMA-1603-DR-LA New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana August 2015

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on 29 August 2005, near the town of Buras, Louisiana, with sustained winds of more than 125 miles per hour. The accompanying storm surge damaged levees and entered the city of New Orleans from various coastal waterways, resulting in flooding throughout much of the city. The storm’s high winds, heavy rains, and flooding caused considerable damage to the site of the City of New Orleans’ Department of Public Works Field Offices complex.

    This Draft EA has been prepared to analyze the potential consequences to the natural and human environment associated with the Proposed Action, the No Action Alternative, and other potential alternatives per the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 55 parts 4321 et seq., 2000), the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 30 parts 1500 et seq., 2004), and 44 CFR Emergency Management and Assistance Ch. I Part 10.

     

     

  • Environmental Assessment St. Bernard Basin Back Protection Levee System Extension, Violet, Louisiana (HMGP Project Number 1603-0438) (October 2016)

    On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, a category 3 hurricane with a storm surge well above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama Gulf Coasts. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the state of Louisiana due to damages from Hurricane Katrina and signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) 5121, et seq. Section 404 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) to provide funds to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration.

    The Lake Borgne Basin Levee District (LBBLD) with the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East (SLFPA-E), through the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP) applied for funding under FEMA HMGP. The SLFPA-E is pursuing a FEMA certification of an existing interior levee system that connects to the federal levee system within Orleans Parish and St. Bernard Parish. The 40 Arpent Levee System is part of this interior levee system and extends from the Orleans/St. Bernard Parish line, where it connects to the Florida Avenue Levee, to south of the town of Verret, where it ties into high ground adjacent to the Hurricane and Storm Damage Risk Reduction System (HSDRRS). This Environmental Assessment was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the President’s Council on Environmental Quality regulations to implement NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 1500-1508), and FEMA’s procedures for implementing NEPA (FEMA Instruction 108-1-1).

  • Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment: City of New Orleans Youth Study Center Vicinity Streets/ St. Bernard Area (FEMA-1603-DR-LA),

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 3 hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama gulf coasts on August 29, 2005. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 125 miles per hour (mph). President George W. Bush signed a disaster declaration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) for the state of Louisiana on August 29, 2005, authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), PL 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Program to repair, restore, and replace state and local government and certain private nonprofit facilities damaged as a result of the declared event. In accordance with FEMA Instruction 108-1-1, a Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA) has been prepared pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ; 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). (Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act 2005).

    An Environmental Assessment (EA) including the project now under review was developed for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as part of City of New Orleans’ application for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). This EA concluded with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), dated 11 August 2015, which was affirmed by the State of Louisiana’s Office of Community Development (OCD), the administrator of the requested HUD funds. Any federal agency may adopt another federal agency’s EA, and is encouraged to do so, when such adoption would save time and money (40 C.F.R. §§ 1500.4[n], 1500.5[h], and 1506.3), providing the original document satisfies the adopting agency’s NEPA requirements. The delegated HUD EA, which includes additional work not a part of the grant application to FEMA, is included as Appendix A to this document.

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) also has been conducted in accordance with NEPA and the associated CEQ regulations, as well as FEMA’s own regulations implementing NEPA, Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands 1980; and Environmental Considerations 1980). The purpose of this SEA is to analyze potential environmental impacts of the proposed project that were not considered previously. FEMA will use the findings in this SEA in order to determine whether a FONSI adopting HUD’s EA is appropriate or whether preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is warranted.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment, Slidell City Barn Pump Station Drainage Improvements (HMGP Project Number 1603-0321), St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana (FEMA DR-1603-LA)

    On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina, a Category 3 hurricane with a storm surge well above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, and Alabama Gulf Coasts. Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the state of Louisiana due to damages from Hurricane Katrina and signed a disaster declaration (FEMA DR-1603-LA) authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), Public Law (P.L). 93-288, as amended 42 U.S.C. 5121, et seq. Section 404 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) to provide funds to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration.

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is being prepared in accordance with the FEMA Instruction 108-1-1 and the DHS Instruction 023-01-001-01, pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Parts 1500-1508). Through the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP), the City of Slidell has applied for funding under FEMA’s HMGP to reduce localized flooding during and after major storm events within the area of the City of Slidell. The locations for the proposed drainage improvements would be at Bayou Patassat (Latitude 30.273328, Longitude -89.787731) and the existing City Barn Pump Station (Latitude 30.273494, Longitude -89.788233). The purpose of this EA is to analyze and evaluate if the proposed drainage improvement project at the Slidell City Barn Drainage Pump Station (City Barn) would have the potential for significant adverse effects on the quality of the human and natural environment. The results of this EA will be used to make a decision whether to initiate preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or to prepare a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  • Programmatic Agreement among the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Louisiana State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), the Governor’s Office Of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP), and Participating Tribes (December 2016)

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) developed a Prototype Programmatic Agreement (FEMA Prototype Agreement) pursuant to 36 CFR § 800.14(b)(4) in consultation with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) and the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers to serve as a basis for negotiation of a State specific Programmatic Agreement (Agreement) with the State Historic Preservation Officer, State/Tribal Emergency Management Agency, and participating Tribes. This Programmatic Agreement addresses FEMA’s responsibilities under the National Historic Preservation Act, Pub. L. No. 89-665 (1966) (codified as amended at 54 U.S.C. § 306108), and the regulations implementing Section 106 of the NHPA (Section 106) at 36 CFR Part 800 for undertakings in the State of Louisiana in anticipation of or in the immediate aftermath of an event.  It provides for FEMA to consider the effects of its undertakings on historic properties as impacted communities and the State of Louisiana, and/or affected Tribes utilize FEMA assistance to conduct critical preparedness, response and recovery activities to safeguard public health and safety and/or to restore vital community services and functions. It conforms to the FEMA Prototype Agreement as designated by the ACHP on December 17, 2013, and was filed with the ACHP on December 21, 2016.

  • Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment, Pointe Coupee Parish Police Jury Floodwall Protection and Drainage Improvements, New Roads, LA, Project Number 1603-0249 (FEMA-1603-DR-LA), Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana (January 2017)

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida Gulf Coasts on August 24, 2005.  Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour.  On August 29, 2005, President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana and signed a disaster declaration authorizing the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana (Hurricane Katrina, DR1603 -LA).  FEMA is administering this disaster assistance pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), Public Law (PL) 93-288, as amended.  Section 404 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Program (HMGP) to provide funds to states and local governments to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster declaration. Through the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP), the applicant, Point Coupee Parish Police Jury, applied for funding under FEMA’s HMGP to reduce localized flooding during and after storm events within the area Pecan Acres. The hazard mitigation sites for the proposed floodwall and drainage improvements are for the Pecan Acres, Laurent, and Jackson Subdivisions, located in an unincorporated portion of the parish, north of and adjacent to the city of New Roads.  The central GPS coordinates for both the previously approved project and the proposed work are latitude, 30.7109 and longitude, -91.435.

    This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) is being prepared in accordance with the FEMA Instruction 108-1-1 and the DHS Instruction 023-01-001-01, pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Parts 1500-1508).  The SEA evaluates the potential impacts of the proposed action on the physical and human environment. This SEA supplements the existing Environmental Assessment (EA) dated March 2016.  Together, these documents evaluate the Hazard Mitigation proposal funding action and related potential impacts that would result from implementing the project. FEMA is also using the SEA to document compliance with other applicable federal laws and executive orders (E.O.), including the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), E.O. 11988 (Floodplains), E.O. 11990 (Wetlands), and E.O. 12898 (Environmental Justice). The results of this EA will be used to make a decision whether to initiate preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or to prepare a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  • Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment, City of New Orleans Desire Area Road Network Infrastructure Recovery Restoration (FEMA-1603-DR-LA), Orleans Parish, Louisiana (January 2017)

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on 29 August 2005, near the town of Buras, Louisiana, as a Category 3 storm with sustained winds of more than 125 miles per hour. The accompanying high winds, heavy rains, and flooding caused an accumulation of various types of debris on the streets and rights-of-way of New Orleans. Rain accumulation, in combination with debris blockage, saturated soils, and insufficient drainage, caused flooding and standing water in most of the parish/city. As a result of this event, the roadway system incurred considerable damage. President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on 29 August 2005, authorizing the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana. This assistance is pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), Public Law (P.L.) 93-288, as amended. Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Program to assist with funding the repair, restoration, reconstruction, or replacement of public facilities damaged as a result of the declared disaster.

    In accordance with FEMA Instruction 108-1-1, a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) was prepared pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ; 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) (Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act 2005). The PEA, entitled “The City of New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans Joint Infrastructure Recovery Request Project” (JIRR), which would encompass the project now under review, was developed by FEMA to streamline approval of road and utility repair and replacement projects in the City of New Orleans within the PA Program. The JIRR PEA concluded with a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), dated 16 June 2016. The JIRR PEA, which includes additional work not part of the grant application to FEMA, may be accessed at: https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/116899

    This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) also has been conducted in accordance with NEPA and the associated CEQ regulations, as well as FEMA’s own regulations implementing NEPA (44 C.F.R. Parts 9-10) (Floodplain Management and Protection of Wetlands 1980; Environmental Considerations 1980). The purpose of this SEA is to analyze potential environmental impacts of the proposed project (29.9924, -90.0367) that were not considered previously in the JIRR PEA. FEMA will use the findings in this SEA in order to determine whether a FONSI adopting the JIRR EA is appropriate or whether preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is warranted.

  • Draft Environmental Assessment, Society of the Holy Family School, Construction of New School Facility (FEMA-1603-DR-LA), Orleans Parish, Louisiana (March 2017)

    Hurricane Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge above normal high tide levels, moved across the Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida Gulf Coasts on August 24, 2005.  Maximum sustained winds at landfall were estimated at 140 miles per hour. On August 29, 2005, President George W. Bush declared a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA-1603-DR-LA) on 29 August 2005, authorizing the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide federal assistance in designated areas of Louisiana.  This assistance is pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), Public Law (P.L.) 93-288, as amended.  Section 406 of the Stafford Act authorizes FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) Program to assist with funding the repair, restoration, reconstruction, or replacement of public facilities damaged as a result of the declared disaster.

    The Society of the Holy Family School (SOHF) has requested, through the State of Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (LA GOHSEP), that FEMA provide disaster assistance consisting of federal grant funds in accordance with the provisions of the Stafford Act.  The Society of the Holy Family has determined that repair of the damaged facilities to pre-Katrina condition would not be in the best interest of the community.  Consequently, in accordance with 44 C.F.R. § 206.203(d)(1), the SOHF has requested a change of location project, which will allow funds to restore the pre-disaster function of a damaged facility.  The SOHF proposes to construct a new 4,190 square foot (sf) Lafon Child Development Center in the location of the existing FEMA-funded temporary trailers on the school campus.  (Latitude 30.014527, Longitude -90.007457)

    In accordance with FEMA Instruction 108-1-1, a Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA) has been prepared pursuant to Section 102 of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ; 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). (Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act 2005). The purpose of this DEA is to analyze potential environmental impacts of the proposed project.  FEMA will use the findings in this DEA to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).