FEMA Region III Infographics (6)

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This collection includes infographics created by FEMA Region III for sharing and promoting emergency preparedness skills, information, and other resources. To learn more, please visit https://www.fema.gov/region-iii-dc-de-md-pa-va-wv.
Collection Created:
January 5, 2018
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  • The Beat the Odds Infographic has a background image of a speed skating race, with the competitors leaning close together. It reads that your chances to compete for a Winter Olympic medal: 1 in 1,385, 217. Your chances of experiencing a natural disaster: 1 in 4. Sources for statistics are Team USA, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Washington Post. The bottom tag line reads: learn more about a culture of preparedness at www.fema.gov/sports.

    Beat the Odds Infographic

    The Beat the Odds Infographic highlights that your chances of competing for a Winter Olympic Medal are 1 in 1,385, 217, but your chances of...

    Photo by Melissa Wiehenstroer - Jan 23, 2018
  • The Winning Times Infographic includes three different composite images, each with a time comparison to highlight incredible feats and the time it takes to take a preparedness action. The top image is of a downhill skier, sliding along a slope. It reads: 1:44:19, the time it took for Lindsay Vonn to win a gold medal in Women’s Downhill is…the same time it would take to download the FEMA app.’ The second image is of a hockey team, with two players jostling for the puck. It reads: 60:00, the 1980 USA Men’s Hockey team only needed 60 minutes to win gold…in less than an hour your whole family can make a preparedness plan. The last image is of a speed skating race, showing only the legs of the leading skaters. It reads: 1:08:94, in the time it took Shani Davis to speed skate 1000 meters to win the gold medal…you could have signed up for local emergency alerts. The tagline at the very bottom reads: learn more about a Culture of Preparedness at www.fema.gov/sports

    Winning Times Infographic

    The Winning Times Infographic includes three time comparisons to highlight incredible feats and the time it takes to take a preparedness action. Athletes...

    Photo by Melissa Wiehenstroer - Jan 19, 2018
  • The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Infographic features an ice skater in the center, surrounded by six graphics with corresponding graphics: a water valve, a light bulb, a shovel, a flame, fire, and a heart. At the top, it reads: ‘Are you ready for the Winter Games of Preparedness?’ The Ready logo is used for the word ready. What are the traits and skills that it takes to be prepared for emergencies? Preparing for emergencies is similar to training for any sport: you need to work at it over time. It isn’t just as simple as just getting a kit and waiting for disaster to strike. Train like you win medals in the arena that could save your live and those of your loved ones. Learn critical skills and make a plan. Resolve to be ready in 2018 with these easy-to-learn tasks. Each of the six circles represents traits and skills that can help you be prepared for an emergency: shut off water, shut off natural gas, shut off electricity, use a fire extinguisher, garden for food and forage safely, and learn first aid and CPR. Gardening for food and forage safely: Learn about renewable food sources that you can use in an emergency. Look up your local State Extension Service and dig in to all that nature has to offer. Learn First Aid & CPR: you might be the only help available until others arrive. Learn how to provide lifesaving first aid and have a kit. American Red Cross chapters can provide information and training. Get certified today! Shut off electric utilities: teach household members where and how to shut off the electricity to prevent fires and cascading utility damages. Always shut off all the individual circuits before shutting off the main circuit. Use a fire extinguisher: make sure you have a current ABC type fire extinguisher and that everyone knows where it is and how to use it. Contact your local fire department for information on training in your area. Shut off water utilities: locate the shut off valve for the water line and label it with a tag for easy identification. Make sure all household members know where it is and how to turn it off. Shut off natural gas: contact your company for proper procedures and share with your household. If you smell or hear gas, leave immediately, turning off via main outdoor valve. NEVER attempt to turn the gas back on yourself. Join a culture of preparedness; learn more at www.fema.gov/sports

    Do-It-Yourself Infographic

    The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Infographic identifies traits and skills that can help you be prepared for an emergency with six specific tips: shutting off...

    Photo by Amanda Hancher - Jan 23, 2018
  • An image of five hockey players skating on the ice, with two players fighting for the puck up front. The text reads that ‘Every player starts the game with the opportunity to work hard, be passionate and ultimately win... but resilience is a team sport, and in order to win, we must pursue a culture of preparedness.’ At the bottom, a tag line reads: Learn more about a culture of preparedness at www.fema.gov/sports

    Team Preparedness Infographic

    Every player starts the game with the opportunity to work hard, be passionate and ultimately win...

    ...
    Photo by FEMA - Jan 23, 2018
  • The background image shows a close-up view of a lake or pond partially covered in ice and bare tree branches reflected in the water. In the center of the image, text reads: “Flooding can happen at any time of year.” Below that, in larger font, text reads: “Are you prepared?” At the bottom of the image, text reads: “For more information on flood safety visit Ready.gov/floods.”

    Flooding Can Happen Any Time of Year, Are You Prepared?

    Flooding is a year-round hazard. Learn more and get prepared at www.ready.gov/floods.

    Photo by Will Powell - Feb 08, 2018
  • This graphic outlines the responsiblities for public assistance for FEMA, the Recipient (the State) and the Subrecipient (Applicant). Under FEMA it reads: Coordinates with all federal, state and local agencies; establishes Joint Field Office; collects project and cost data; approves grants and obligates funds; and provides technical assistance. Under the Recipient (State), it reads: educates subrecipients; works with FEMA to manage Public Assistance Program; collects project and cost data; disburses grants to applicants (ex. community, county, local public entity); and monitors and manages use of grants by subrecipients. Under the Subrecipient (Applicant) it reads: requests assistance; identifies damaged facilities; provides information to support request; maintains accurate documentation; and performs necessary work (repair, debris, etc.).

    Understanding the Public Assistance Responsibilities Graphic

    This graphic outlines the responsiblities for implementing the Public Assistance (PA) program for FEMA, the Recipient (the State) and the Subrecipient ...

    Photo by Corey Rigby - Jul 19, 2018