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Collection: FEMA Region III Infographics

This collection includes infographics created by FEMA Region III for sharing and promoting emergency preparedness skills, information, and other resources. To learn more, please visit https://www.fema.gov/region-iii-dc-de-md-pa-va-wv.
Collection Created:
January 5, 2018
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  • <p>The Beat the Odds Infographic highlights that your chances of competing for a Winter Olympic Medal are&nbsp;1 in 1,385, 217, but your chances of experiencing a natural disaster are 1 in 4.* Being prepared for an emergency is a goal within reach. Take action today to be prepared for tomorrow&#39;s emergencies.</p>

<p>&nbsp;To learn more about a culture of preparedness, please visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/sports">www.fema.gov/sports</a>.</p>

<p><em>*Sources for statistics are Team USA, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Washington Post.</em></p>

    Beat the Odds Infographic

    Photo by Melissa Wiehenstroer

    The Beat the Odds Infographic highlights that your chances of competing for a Winter Olympic Medal are 1 in 1,385, 217, but your chances of experiencing a natural disaster are 1 in 4.* Being prepared for an emergency is a goal within reach. Take action today to be prepared for tomorrow's emergencies.

     To learn more about a culture of preparedness, please visit www.fema.gov/sports.

    *Sources for statistics are Team USA, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Washington Post.

  • <p>The Winning Times Infographic includes three time comparisons to highlight incredible feats and the time it takes to take a preparedness action. Athletes take months to years to train for an event, some of which are incredibly short. In winning time, you can take simple but effective actions to better prepare yourself for an emergency.&nbsp;</p>

<p>To learn more<strong> </strong>about a culture of preparedness, please visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/sports">www.fema.gov/sports</a></p>

    Winning Times Infographic

    Photo by Melissa Wiehenstroer

    The Winning Times Infographic includes three time comparisons to highlight incredible feats and the time it takes to take a preparedness action. Athletes take months to years to train for an event, some of which are incredibly short. In winning time, you can take simple but effective actions to better prepare yourself for an emergency. 

    To learn more about a culture of preparedness, please visit www.fema.gov/sports

  • <p>The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Infographic identifies traits and skills that can help you be prepared for an emergency with six specific tips: shutting off water; shutting off electricity; gardening for food and foraging safely; shutting off natural gas; using a fire extinguisher, and learning first aid and CPR skills.&nbsp;Each of these skills help you to be better prepared for future emergencies or disasters.&nbsp;</p>

<p>To learn more about a culture of preparedness, please visit <a href="http://www.fema.gov/sports">www.fema.gov/sports</a>.</p>

    Do-It-Yourself Infographic

    Photo by Amanda Hancher

    The Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Infographic identifies traits and skills that can help you be prepared for an emergency with six specific tips: shutting off water; shutting off electricity; gardening for food and foraging safely; shutting off natural gas; using a fire extinguisher, and learning first aid and CPR skills. Each of these skills help you to be better prepared for future emergencies or disasters. 

    To learn more about a culture of preparedness, please visit www.fema.gov/sports.

  • <p>Every player starts the game with the opportunity to work hard, be passionate and ultimately win...</p>

<p>... but resilience is a team sport, and in order to win, we must pursue a culture of preparedness.</p>

<p>Learn more about a culture of preparedness at <a href="http://www.fema.gov/sports">www.fema.gov/sports</a></p>

    Team Preparedness Infographic

    Photo by FEMA

    Every player starts the game with the opportunity to work hard, be passionate and ultimately win...

    ... but resilience is a team sport, and in order to win, we must pursue a culture of preparedness.

    Learn more about a culture of preparedness at www.fema.gov/sports

  • <p>Flooding is a year-round hazard. Learn more and get prepared at <a href="http://www.ready.gov/floods">www.ready.gov/floods</a>.</p>

    Flooding Can Happen Any Time of Year, Are You Prepared?

    Photo by Will Powell

    Flooding is a year-round hazard. Learn more and get prepared at www.ready.gov/floods.

  • <p>Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. The Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30. Hurricanes can happen along any U.S. coast or territory in the Atlantic or Pacific. Hurricanes can affect areas more than 100 miles inland. Hurricane season is most active in September. Threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides.</p>

    Quick Facts About Hurricanes

    Photo by Amanda Hancher

    Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. The Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30. Hurricanes can happen along any U.S. coast or territory in the Atlantic or Pacific. Hurricanes can affect areas more than 100 miles inland. Hurricane season is most active in September. Threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides.

  • <p>There are many actions for can take to prepare for hurricane season, including: Sign up for your community&#39;s warning system; Keep important documents in a safe place; Protect your property; Gather needed supplies for at least 4 days; If you are at risk for flash flooding watch for signs such as heavy rain; Practice going to a safe place; Based on your location and community plans match your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place; and Become familiar with your evacuation zone.</p>

    Prepare Now for Hurricane Season

    Photo by Amanda Hancher

    There are many actions for can take to prepare for hurricane season, including: Sign up for your community's warning system; Keep important documents in a safe place; Protect your property; Gather needed supplies for at least 4 days; If you are at risk for flash flooding watch for signs such as heavy rain; Practice going to a safe place; Based on your location and community plans match your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place; and Become familiar with your evacuation zone.

  • <p>This graphic outlines the responsiblities for implementing the Public Assistance (PA) program for FEMA, the Recipient (the State) and the Subrecipient (Applicant).</p>

    Understanding the Public Assistance Responsibilities Graphic

    Photo by Corey Rigby

    This graphic outlines the responsiblities for implementing the Public Assistance (PA) program for FEMA, the Recipient (the State) and the Subrecipient (Applicant).

  • <p>This is a hierarchical chart of FEMA Region III&#39;s organization.</p>

    FEMA Region III Organizational Chart

    Photo by Amanda Hancher

    This is a hierarchical chart of FEMA Region III's organization.