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Collection: Hazard Mitigation Assistance

Hazard Mitigation Assistance - Collection of documents
Collection Created:
February 13, 2017
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  • <p>This image shows that every $1 spent on hazard mitigation provides the nation approximately $4 in future benefits.</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Stats Graphic

    Photo by Kirsten Roth

    This image shows that every $1 spent on hazard mitigation provides the nation approximately $4 in future benefits.

  • <p>This image describes a few facts that outline the history of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.</p>

    History of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program

    Photo by Kirsten Roth

    This image describes a few facts that outline the history of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.

  • <p>This image shows Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants in 2016.</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants in 2016

    Photo by Kirsten Roth

    This image shows Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants in 2016.

  • <p>Total Disaster Assistance in Billions:</p>

<p>$0 to $2 billion - 15%</p>

<p>$2 to $10 billion - 10%</p>

<p>$10 to $35 1/3 billion - 7.5%</p>

<p>Total Percentage eligible for HMGP: 20% (states with enhanced plans)</p>

<p>(0 to $35 1/3 billion dollars).</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Calculation

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Total Disaster Assistance in Billions:

    $0 to $2 billion - 15%

    $2 to $10 billion - 10%

    $10 to $35 1/3 billion - 7.5%

    Total Percentage eligible for HMGP: 20% (states with enhanced plans)

    (0 to $35 1/3 billion dollars).

  • <p>Benefits; Tribes as Applicant; Tribes as Subapplicant.</p>

<p>Control over entire application process; yes; no.</p>

<p>Set hazard mitigation and redevelopment priority to the tribe&#39;s specific needs; yes; possibly.</p>

<p>Submit own prioritized list of specific projects to FEMA; yes; no.</p>

<p>Additional preparation and review time for application submittal; yes; no.</p>

<p>5 percent initiative funding; yes; possibly.</p>

<p>Up to 7 percent of the Applicant&#39;s HMGP ceiling may be used for mitigation planning activities; yes; possibly.</p>

<p>Control of HMGP Advance Assistance Pilot funds available; yes; limited.</p>

<p>Funding available for management costs; yes; possibly.</p>

<p>Responsibilities; Tribes as Applicant; Tribes as Subapplicant.</p>

<p>Submit a disaster declaration request to FEMA within 30 days of the incident; yes; no.</p>

<p>Have minimum staffing requirements for grant administration; yes; no.</p>

<p>Have a FEMA-approved Hazard Mitigation Plan; yes; yes.</p>

<p>Have an approved Administrative Plan; yes; no.</p>

<p>Perform Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) application review (i.e., determination of technical feasibility and effectiveness); yes; yes.</p>

<p>Provide non-Federal match funds; yes; possibly.</p>

<p>Ensure Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) compliance and Federal requirements for floodplain management and protection of wetlands are met; yes; yes. Submit quarterly financial and progress reports; yes; yes.</p>

<p>Perform grant closeout procedures and maintain files for 3 years; yes; no.</p>

    Benefits of Tribes as Applicants or Subapplicants for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Benefits; Tribes as Applicant; Tribes as Subapplicant.

    Control over entire application process; yes; no.

    Set hazard mitigation and redevelopment priority to the tribe's specific needs; yes; possibly.

    Submit own prioritized list of specific projects to FEMA; yes; no.

    Additional preparation and review time for application submittal; yes; no.

    5 percent initiative funding; yes; possibly.

    Up to 7 percent of the Applicant's HMGP ceiling may be used for mitigation planning activities; yes; possibly.

    Control of HMGP Advance Assistance Pilot funds available; yes; limited.

    Funding available for management costs; yes; possibly.

    Responsibilities; Tribes as Applicant; Tribes as Subapplicant.

    Submit a disaster declaration request to FEMA within 30 days of the incident; yes; no.

    Have minimum staffing requirements for grant administration; yes; no.

    Have a FEMA-approved Hazard Mitigation Plan; yes; yes.

    Have an approved Administrative Plan; yes; no.

    Perform Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) application review (i.e., determination of technical feasibility and effectiveness); yes; yes.

    Provide non-Federal match funds; yes; possibly.

    Ensure Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) compliance and Federal requirements for floodplain management and protection of wetlands are met; yes; yes. Submit quarterly financial and progress reports; yes; yes.

    Perform grant closeout procedures and maintain files for 3 years; yes; no.

  • <p>A graphic that outlines the roles of Tribes as subapplicants or applicants for hazard mitigation grants.</p>

    Role of Tribes as Subapplicants and Applicants for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    A graphic that outlines the roles of Tribes as subapplicants or applicants for hazard mitigation grants.

  • <p>Applicant: The entity, such as a state, territory, or Federally-recognized tribe, applying to FEMA for a federal award that will be accountable for the use of the funds. Once funds are awarded, the applicant becomes the recipient or pass-through entity, or both.</p>

<p>Subapplicant: The entity, such as a community/local government, Federally-recognized tribe, or private nonprofit, that submits a subapplication to the applicant for FEMA assistance. Once funding is awarded, the subapplicant becomes the subrecipient.</p>

    Definitions of the Applicants and Subapplicants of Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Applicant: The entity, such as a state, territory, or Federally-recognized tribe, applying to FEMA for a federal award that will be accountable for the use of the funds. Once funds are awarded, the applicant becomes the recipient or pass-through entity, or both.

    Subapplicant: The entity, such as a community/local government, Federally-recognized tribe, or private nonprofit, that submits a subapplication to the applicant for FEMA assistance. Once funding is awarded, the subapplicant becomes the subrecipient.

  • <p>A graphic that sums up the different roles in the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grant process.</p>

    Roles in the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grant Process

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    A graphic that sums up the different roles in the Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grant process.

  • <p>U.S. Map with State locations of the following projects:</p>

<p>Washington: Loss Avoidance Study: City of Snoqualmie;</p>

<p>Loss Avoidance Study: Cities of Issaquah and Stanwood Drainage Improvement Projects.</p>

<p>Oregon: Oregon Property Acquisition and Structure Elevation.</p>

<p>California: Northern California Flood Control Mitigation; Sonoma County California Structure Elevation Mitigation; Southern California Flood Control Mitigation.</p>

<p>Colorado: Higher Regulatory Standards 2013 Colorado Floods.</p>

<p>Iowa: Southwestern Community College Tornado Safe Room; Iowa Building Modification Projects; Iowa Flood Reduction Projects.</p>

<p>Wisconsin: Flood Mitigation Projects.</p>

<p>Missouri: Eastern Missouri Building Acquisition.</p>

<p>North Carolina: Losses Avoided from Hurricane Matthew.</p>

<p>Alabama: Birmingham, AL Acquisitions.</p>

<p>Mississippi: Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson Counties.</p>

<p>Louisiana: Jefferson Parish.</p>

<p>Florida: Broward County Hurricane Wind Mitigation Projects.</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Assistance Loss Avoidance Studies

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    U.S. Map with State locations of the following projects:

    Washington: Loss Avoidance Study: City of Snoqualmie;

    Loss Avoidance Study: Cities of Issaquah and Stanwood Drainage Improvement Projects.

    Oregon: Oregon Property Acquisition and Structure Elevation.

    California: Northern California Flood Control Mitigation; Sonoma County California Structure Elevation Mitigation; Southern California Flood Control Mitigation.

    Colorado: Higher Regulatory Standards 2013 Colorado Floods.

    Iowa: Southwestern Community College Tornado Safe Room; Iowa Building Modification Projects; Iowa Flood Reduction Projects.

    Wisconsin: Flood Mitigation Projects.

    Missouri: Eastern Missouri Building Acquisition.

    North Carolina: Losses Avoided from Hurricane Matthew.

    Alabama: Birmingham, AL Acquisitions.

    Mississippi: Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson Counties.

    Louisiana: Jefferson Parish.

    Florida: Broward County Hurricane Wind Mitigation Projects.

  • <p>Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Cost Share pie graph: FEMA 75%, Non-Federal 25%.</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Cost Share

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Cost Share pie graph: FEMA 75%, Non-Federal 25%.

  • <p><strong>Enhanced Plan: </strong>A hazard mitigation plan that includes all elements of the Standard&nbsp;State Mitigation Plan&nbsp;and demonstrates that the state has developed a comprehensive mitigation program and is capable of managing increased funding to achieve its mitigation goals. Also, the plan is integrated to the extent practicable with other state and/or regional planning initiatives and FEMA mitigation programs and initiatives.</p>

<p><strong>Standard Plan: </strong>A hazard mitigation plan is a stakeholder-driven document that a state, tribal, or local government uses to describe risks and vulnerabilities as well as long-term strategies and implementation approaches for reducing loss of life and property from natural disasters. Mitigation plans are key to breaking the cycle of disaster damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage.</p>

<p><strong>Benefit of an Enhanced Plan:</strong></p>

<p>A state with a FEMA-approved Enhanced Mitigation Plan is eligible to receive increased funds under HMGP following a disaster declaration. Specifically, a state with an Enhanced Mitigation Plan receives HMGP funds based on 20% of the total estimated eligible Stafford Act disaster assistance, versus 15% for states without Enhanced Mitigation Plans.</p>

    Mitigation Plan Benefits and Definitions

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Enhanced Plan: A hazard mitigation plan that includes all elements of the Standard State Mitigation Plan and demonstrates that the state has developed a comprehensive mitigation program and is capable of managing increased funding to achieve its mitigation goals. Also, the plan is integrated to the extent practicable with other state and/or regional planning initiatives and FEMA mitigation programs and initiatives.

    Standard Plan: A hazard mitigation plan is a stakeholder-driven document that a state, tribal, or local government uses to describe risks and vulnerabilities as well as long-term strategies and implementation approaches for reducing loss of life and property from natural disasters. Mitigation plans are key to breaking the cycle of disaster damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage.

    Benefit of an Enhanced Plan:

    A state with a FEMA-approved Enhanced Mitigation Plan is eligible to receive increased funds under HMGP following a disaster declaration. Specifically, a state with an Enhanced Mitigation Plan receives HMGP funds based on 20% of the total estimated eligible Stafford Act disaster assistance, versus 15% for states without Enhanced Mitigation Plans.

  • <p>Local Government: Per 44 CFR Section 201.2, local government is any county, municipality, city, town, township, public authority, school district, special district, intrastate district, council of governments (regardless of whether the council of governments is incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under state law), regional or interstate government entity, or agency or instrumentality of a local government; any Indian tribe or authorized tribal organization, or Alaska Native village or organization that is not a Federally-recognized tribe; and any rural community, unincorporated town or village, or other public entity.</p>

<p>Federally-Recognized Tribe: The governing body of any Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe under the Federally Recognized Tribe List Act of 1994 (25 U.S.C. 479a et seq.). This does not include Alaska Native corporations, the ownership of which is vested in private individuals. &nbsp;Only Federally-recognized tribes can directly request disaster declarations from the federal government.</p>

    Definitions of Local Government and Federally-Recognized Tribes for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Local Government: Per 44 CFR Section 201.2, local government is any county, municipality, city, town, township, public authority, school district, special district, intrastate district, council of governments (regardless of whether the council of governments is incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under state law), regional or interstate government entity, or agency or instrumentality of a local government; any Indian tribe or authorized tribal organization, or Alaska Native village or organization that is not a Federally-recognized tribe; and any rural community, unincorporated town or village, or other public entity.

    Federally-Recognized Tribe: The governing body of any Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe under the Federally Recognized Tribe List Act of 1994 (25 U.S.C. 479a et seq.). This does not include Alaska Native corporations, the ownership of which is vested in private individuals.  Only Federally-recognized tribes can directly request disaster declarations from the federal government.

  • <p>A graphic explaining Mitigation cost sharing.</p>

    Mitigation Cost Sharing Graphic

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    A graphic explaining Mitigation cost sharing.

  • <p>A graphic with stats on Hazard Mitigation Program funds.</p>

    $13.8 Billion Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Funds

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    A graphic with stats on Hazard Mitigation Program funds.

  • <p>Disaster strikes/President declares disaster.</p>

<p>Contact your local emergency management agency for support and to provide requested information.</p>

<p>Work with the community to develop and submit a project application through your State.</p>

<p>FEMA approves project and awards funding.</p>

<p>Work may begin on approved project.</p>

<p>Provide compliance documentation to local officials to finalize and close out project.</p>

    Individual Steps for the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Process

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Disaster strikes/President declares disaster.

    Contact your local emergency management agency for support and to provide requested information.

    Work with the community to develop and submit a project application through your State.

    FEMA approves project and awards funding.

    Work may begin on approved project.

    Provide compliance documentation to local officials to finalize and close out project.

  • <p>HMGP Funding Available.</p>

<p>1. Project Scoping</p>

<p>2. Project Development</p>

<p>3. Project Submission</p>

<p>4. Project Review</p>

<p>5. Project Award and Obligation</p>

<p>6. Project Implementation and Monitoring</p>

<p>7. Award Closeout</p>

    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Steps

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    HMGP Funding Available.

    1. Project Scoping

    2. Project Development

    3. Project Submission

    4. Project Review

    5. Project Award and Obligation

    6. Project Implementation and Monitoring

    7. Award Closeout

  • <p>Timeline from 0 to 48 months.</p>

<p>Step 1: Project scoping, 6 months.</p>

<p>Step 2: Project development, 5 months.</p>

<p>Step 3: Project submission, 1 month.</p>

<p>Step 4: Project review, Average of 90 days.</p>

<p>Step 5: Project award and obligation, 1 to 3 months.</p>

<p>Step 6: Project implementation and monitoring, Up to 36 months.</p>

<p>Step 7: Award closeout, 90 days.</p>

    Timeline for the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Timeline from 0 to 48 months.

    Step 1: Project scoping, 6 months.

    Step 2: Project development, 5 months.

    Step 3: Project submission, 1 month.

    Step 4: Project review, Average of 90 days.

    Step 5: Project award and obligation, 1 to 3 months.

    Step 6: Project implementation and monitoring, Up to 36 months.

    Step 7: Award closeout, 90 days.

  • <p>Inverted triangle flowchart - top to bottom:</p>

<p>Individual homeowners, businesses, and private nonprofits may apply for funding through eligible subapplicants to</p>

<p>Subapplicants: State Agencies; Federally-Recognized Tribes; Tribal Agencies; Local Government/Communities to</p>

<p>Applicants: Territories; Federally-Recognized Tribes; States to</p>

<p>FEMA.</p>

    Eligible Applicants and Subapplicants for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Inverted triangle flowchart - top to bottom:

    Individual homeowners, businesses, and private nonprofits may apply for funding through eligible subapplicants to

    Subapplicants: State Agencies; Federally-Recognized Tribes; Tribal Agencies; Local Government/Communities to

    Applicants: Territories; Federally-Recognized Tribes; States to

    FEMA.

  • <p>Inverted triangle flowchart - top to bottom:</p>

<p>Individual homeowners, businesses, and private nonprofits may apply for funding through eligible subapplicants to</p>

<p>Subapplicants: State Agencies; Federally-Recognized Tribes; Tribal Agencies; Local Government/Communities to</p>

<p>Applicants: Territories; Federally-Recognized Tribes; States to</p>

<p>FEMA.</p>

    Eligible Applicants and Subapplicants for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Inverted triangle flowchart - top to bottom:

    Individual homeowners, businesses, and private nonprofits may apply for funding through eligible subapplicants to

    Subapplicants: State Agencies; Federally-Recognized Tribes; Tribal Agencies; Local Government/Communities to

    Applicants: Territories; Federally-Recognized Tribes; States to

    FEMA.

  • <p>Frontloading Steps: Develop/update hazard mitigation plan; Identify the community need; project scoping; project development; subapplication development.&nbsp; Then, Subapplication submission and review; Award; Project implementation; project monitoring; project closeout.&nbsp; Then process begins again.</p>

    Steps in the Hazard Mitigation Grant Project Process

    Photo by Roosevelt Grant

    Frontloading Steps: Develop/update hazard mitigation plan; Identify the community need; project scoping; project development; subapplication development.  Then, Subapplication submission and review; Award; Project implementation; project monitoring; project closeout.  Then process begins again.