Main Content

Collection: IPAWS

The Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) is a modernization and integration of the nation’s alert and warning infrastructure and will save time when time matters most, protecting life and property.
Collection Created:
May 13, 2014
RSS Feed
  • <p>On October 3rd, 2018 at approximately 2:20 PM eastern time. FEMA will conduct a national test of the integrated public alert and warning system. This national system which includes the emergency alert system and the wireless emergency alerts will provide authenticated emergency information from emergency officials to the public through radio, television, cellular phones and some internet applications. We sat down with Antwan Johnson, the director of the integrated public alert and warning program at FEMA headquarters to help explain what people can expect from the test and why it&#39;s an important step in developing a more prepared nation.</p>

    Podcast - EAS WEA Test

    Audio by Mark Peterson

    On October 3rd, 2018 at approximately 2:20 PM eastern time. FEMA will conduct a national test of the integrated public alert and warning system. This national system which includes the emergency alert system and the wireless emergency alerts will provide authenticated emergency information from emergency officials to the public through radio, television, cellular phones and some internet applications. We sat down with Antwan Johnson, the director of the integrated public alert and warning program at FEMA headquarters to help explain what people can expect from the test and why it's an important step in developing a more prepared nation.

  • <p>El Sistema de Alertas de Emergencia Inal&aacute;mbricas (WEA, por sus siglas en ingl&eacute;s)</p>

<p>env&iacute;a mensajes por medio de su proveedor de tel&eacute;fono celular. La alerta</p>

<p>aparecer&aacute; en el cuadro de mensajes de su tel&eacute;fono, y har&aacute; un sonido alto con</p>

<p>vibraci&oacute;n. Este mensaje es distinto a un mensaje de texto. Su n&uacute;mero de tel&eacute;fono</p>

<p>no ser&aacute; compartido con nadie. Nota: el texto del alerta aparecer&aacute; en ingl&eacute;s.</p>

    Wireless Emergency Alert System online flyer (spanish)

    Photo by FEMA Graphic

    El Sistema de Alertas de Emergencia Inalámbricas (WEA, por sus siglas en inglés)

    envía mensajes por medio de su proveedor de teléfono celular. La alerta

    aparecerá en el cuadro de mensajes de su teléfono, y hará un sonido alto con

    vibración. Este mensaje es distinto a un mensaje de texto. Su número de teléfono

    no será compartido con nadie. Nota: el texto del alerta aparecerá en inglés.

  • <p>Photograph of the IPAWS exhibit booth used at various large conferences and events. At conferences IPAWS staff demonstrate alert origination and dissemination technologies, connect with stakeholders, and&nbsp;take questions from alerting authorities, private sector developers, and the general public.</p>

    Conferences and Events - The IPAWS Exhibit Booth

    Photo by Justin Singer

    Photograph of the IPAWS exhibit booth used at various large conferences and events. At conferences IPAWS staff demonstrate alert origination and dissemination technologies, connect with stakeholders, and take questions from alerting authorities, private sector developers, and the general public.

  • <p style="margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in">Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, September 19, 2018 &ndash; Siren of the first recently installed system in Guajataca Dam that works with Integrated Public Alert &amp; Warning System (IPAWS) of the United States. FEMA funds were used to install a series of 7 sirens in different places near the Guajataca Dam to alert residents of danger and evacuation procedures. FEMA/ Michael Medina Latorre</p>

    Guajataca Siren

    Photo by Michael Medina-Latorre

    Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, September 19, 2018 – Siren of the first recently installed system in Guajataca Dam that works with Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) of the United States. FEMA funds were used to install a series of 7 sirens in different places near the Guajataca Dam to alert residents of danger and evacuation procedures. FEMA/ Michael Medina Latorre