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  • Using HAZUS-MH to Promote Seismic Safety

    HAZUS-MH has become a valuable tool for risk and emergency managers at all levels of government and the private sector. The earthquake model has been used to carry out national studies of annualized earthquake loss, to develop scenarios for catastrophic planning, to support evaluations of seismic safety of hospitals and other essential facilities, and to support risk assessments and mitigation planning in seismically vulnerable regions of the United States. This handout shows some of the ways HAZUS-MH has been used to promote seismic safety.
  • Environmental Assessment for the Cuyahoga Area Wide Radio System Communications Tower, Ohio (June 2008)

    Cuyahoga County has applied for funding under the Homeland Security Grant Program – Urban Area Security Initiative to construct a 299-foot self-support (lattice) communication tower within the previously disturbed Crowne Filtration Plant compound located at 955 Clague Road in the City of Westlake. The tower would provide interoperable communication among first responders within Cuyahoga County in the event of a natural disaster or act of terrorism. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), an Environmental Assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed project on the human environment.
  • FY08/FY09 NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare

    FY08/FY09 NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare
  • NIMS Alert 07-08 FY08/FY09 Healthcare Organizations

    NIMS Alert 07-08 -FY08/FY09Healthcare Organizations
  • Environmental Assessment for the Monte Cristo Grade Road Bridge, Snohomish County, Washington (June 2008)

    Snohomish County has applied for funding under FEMA’s Public Assistance program to construct a bridge that will restore access to Monte Cristo Grade Road near Verlot, Washington, which washed out during a record rainfall and flooding of the Southfork Stillaguamish River during October 19-21, 2003. Additional erosion occurred during the 2006 and 2007 flood seasons. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and FEMA’s regulations implementing NEPA (44 CFR Part 10), an Environmental Assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed project on the human environment.
  • Environmental Assessment for the Live Oaks Treatment Center Relocation Project, Harrison County, MS (June 2008)

    The Gulf Coast Mental Health Center (GCMHC) has applied for funding under FEMA’s Public Assistance Program being administered in response to Hurricane Katrina (FEMA-1604-DR-MS) for the proposed relocation of the Live Oaks Treatment Center (LOTC) formerly located at 15094 County Barn Road within the Gulf Coast Mental Health Center complex in Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi. Katrina’s storm surge and associated high winds severely damaged the LOTC. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and FEMA’s regulations implementing NEPA (44 CFR Part 10), an Environmental Assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed project on the human environment.
  • HAZUS-MH Overview: What Could Happen?

    HAZUS-MH combines science, engineering, and mathematical modeling with GIS technology to estimate losses of life and property—and shows those losses on a map. HAZUS-MH estimates impacts to the physical, social, and economic vitality of a community from earthquakes, hurricane winds, and floods.
  • HAZUS Hot Zone

    The March issue of FEMA’s HAZUS Hot Zone newsletter contains information about Orange County’s Facilities Risk Assessment Data Compilations, HUG News, Training Information, and 2008 National HAZUS User Conference details. The theme for the 2008 conference is “From Data Collection to Decision Making.”
  • NFIP/CRS Update Newsletter - August 2009

    NFIP/CRS Update is a publication of the National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System. Its purpose is to provide local officials and others interested in the Community Rating System with news they can use.
  • Risk Prioritization Tool for Dams

    The Risk Prioritization Tool for Dams is a standards-based decision-making tool for risk-based dam safety prioritization to be used by state dam safety regulators throughout the country to identify those dams within a large inventory that most urgently need attention and then allocate resources accordingly. Once priorities are judged, risk acceptance or tolerability is a matter of policy that will vary from state to state. The tool is quick and easy to implement; applicable to any type or number of dams; accommodates the broad differences between owners and information known about each dam; avoids subjectivity and unnecessary bias; and is defensible and reproducible. The tool requires very little disk space and will run on any computer that is currently running Microsoft Excel 2002 or newer. Before getting started, download and read the Users Manual. Section 2.2 explains installation and setup.
  • Regional NIMS Coordinators

    Regional NIMS Coordinators
  • Stay Dry: A Basic Application to View FEMA Flood Hazard Information Using Google Earth ™

    The “Stay Dry” utility allows you to use Google Earth (TM) to view basic flood hazard information from FEMA’s National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) for a community or an address. You can view flood hazard zones, cross sections and labels, community names and boundaries, Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) numbers and boundaries, and Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) case numbers and boundaries. To use the application, you must have Google Earth installed on your computer, a high-speed Internet connection, and the Stay Dry kmz file. The kmz file is available through FEMA's Map Service Center at http://msc.fema.gov.

  • NFHL GIS Data: Perform Spatial Analyses and Make Custom Maps and Reports

    Effective regulatory flood hazard information is available as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data in the form of the National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL). The NFHL provides users with the ability to determine the flood zone, base flood elevation and floodway status for a particular geographic location. It also has National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) community information, map panel information, cross section and hydraulic structure information, Coastal Barrier Resource System information (if applicable) and base map information, such as road, stream and public land survey data. The data made available through the NFHL may be used to perform spatial analyses and make custom maps and reports. This document provides further details on accessing and using the NFHL.

  • FEMA NFHL: View Custom Combinations of FEMA Flood Hazard Information Using Google Earth™

    The FEMA NFHL utility allows you to use Google Earth (TM) to view custom combinations of flood hazard information from FEMA’s National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL). View one, several, or all of the layers available in the application. The NFHL layers include flood hazard zones, floodways, Coastal Barrier Resources System and Otherwise Protected Area units, community boundaries and names, Base Flood Elevations, cross sections and coastal transects and their labels, hydraulic and flood control structures, and Flood Insurance Rate Map and Letter of Map Revision boundaries and numbers. Additional reference layers include the status of NFHL data availability, point locations for Letters of Map Amendment and Letters of Map Revision Based on Fill, Q3 base flood, and subbasin hydrologic units. To use the application, you must have Google Earth installed on your computer, a high-speed Internet connection, and the FEMA NFHL kmz file. The kmz file is available through FEMA's Map Service Center at http://msc.fema.gov.

  • National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL): New Products and Services for FEMA's Flood Hazard Map Data

    Effective regulatory flood hazard information is available as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data in the form of the National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL). The NFHL provides users with the ability to determine the flood zone, base flood elevation and floodway status for a particular geographic location. It also has National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) community information, map panel information, cross section and hydraulic structure information, Coastal Barrier Resource System information (if applicable) and base map information, such as road, stream and public land survey data. The NFHL dataset represents the current effective flood risk data for those parts of the country where maps have been modernized. It is a compilation of effective Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) databases and Letters of Map Revision (LOMR). The NFHL is updated as new data reaches its designated effective date and becomes valid for regulatory use under the NFIP.

  • NIMS ALERT: NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare Organizations

    NIMS ALERT: NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare Organizations
  • NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare Organizations

    NIMS Implementation Objectives for Healthcare Organizations
  • FY2008 NIMS Compliance Objectives States and Territories: Correction

    FY2008 NIMS Compliance Objectives States and Territories: Correction
  • Floodplain Management Bulletin on Historic Structures

    The purpose of this floodplain management bulletin is to explain how the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) defines historic structure and how it gives relief to historic structures from NFIP floodplain management require­ments (44 CFR §60.3). This bulletin also provides guidance on mitigation measures that can be taken to minimize the devastating effects of flooding to historic structures.
  • 2008 National Flood Conference Newsletter

    A daily recap of events taking place at the 2008 National Flood Conference