U.S. flag

미국 정부 공식 웹사이트입니다

Dot gov

.gov로 공식 웹사이트임을.

연방 정부 웹사이트는 종종 .gov 또는 .mil로 끝납니다. 민감한 정보를 공유하기 전, 귀하가 연방 정부 사이트에 접속하셨는지 확인하십시오.

Https

이 사이트는 보안이 유지됩니다.

https://는 귀하가 공식 웹사이트에 접속했음과 귀하가 제공하는 정보는 확실히 안전하게 암호화 및 전송될 것입니다.

alert - warning

이 페이지는한국어로(으로) 번역되지 않았습니다. 해당 언어의 리소스는 한국어 페이지를 방문해 주십시오.

Disaster Authorities

There are many different authorities that define how FEMA responds to disasters. In this section, you can find information about how each of these authorities affect the agency’s operations.

alert - info

Visit our Guidance Documents page for more information on how we administer statutory and regulatory authorities.

Learn About Disaster Authorities

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act constitutes the statutory authority for most federal disaster response activities and established the presidential disaster declaration process.

The Defense Production Act is the primary source of presidential authorities to expedite and expand the supply of materials and services from the U.S. industrial base needed to promote the national defense. DPA authorities may support emergency activities related to the Stafford Act, and may also protect or restore critical infrastructure.  

On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina became the most devastating natural disaster in U.S. history. As a result, President George W. Bush signed into law the Post-Katrina Emergency Reform Act on Oct. 4, 2006. The act significantly reorganized FEMA and provided it new authority to remedy gaps that became apparent in Hurricane Katrina response efforts.

Following Hurricane Sandy’s Oct. 24, 2012 landfall, the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 authorizes several significant changes to the way FEMA may deliver federal disaster assistance to survivors.

Following the devastating hurricane and wildfire season of 2017, the Disaster Recovery Reform Act of 2018 brought about reforms that acknowledge the shared responsibility for disaster response and recovery, aim to reduce the complexity of FEMA, and build the nation’s capacity for the next catastrophic event.