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This suite of content is intended for use on your social media channels to explain FEMA’s disaster assistance programs. The content and visuals can help survivors navigate through the recovery process and get them the right information. Content is written for different social media platforms. In addition to any local area hashtags you may be using, please incorporate #FLRecovers into your messages as you are able for an additional signal boost.

Apply for assistance

If you live in Florida and were affected by Hurricane Irma, you can apply for assistance at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. You can also apply by calling 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service available) or 800-462-7585 (TTY)

If you were affected by #Irma, apply for assistance at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or call 800-621-3362. #FLRecovers

Get help with your #IrmaRecovery this month by visiting one of our centers, calling 800-621-3362 or go to www.DisasterAssistance.gov #FLRecovers

#3WaystoApply for #IrmaHurricane help: Call 800-621-3362 (711/VRS ok, or 800-462-7585 TTY), apply online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov, or visit one of our recovery centers. Apply Today! #FLRecovers

#FL: Here’s the info you’ll need to apply for disaster assistance. Call 800-621-3362 or visit www.DisasterAssistance.gov #Irma #FLRecovers

 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service) TTY: 800-462-7585. FEMA seal
This graphic lists seven info items that applicants will need when applying for individual disaster assistance. (This is version 2 of this graphic). Download Original
 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service), 800-462-7585 (TTY). In person at one of our Disaster Recovery Centers.
This graphic shares three ways to apply for disaster aid: online, by phone, or in person at a Disaster Recovery Center. (This is version 2 of this graphic) Download Original
 

What to expect after you apply for FEMA assistance

If you applied for assistance for Hurricane Irma, here's what you can expect next. Also, visit the disaster page for more resources and information like this: www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL. #FloridaStrong

 What to expect after you apply for FEMA aid. You may receive an application to apply for a low-interest long-term SBA loan. Completing the SBA loan application is an important step in finding out what aid may be available to you. As a homeowner you may borrow up to $200,000 to repair/replace your primary residence, and up to $40,000 to repair/replace personal property. You are not required to accept the loan in order to receive FEMA assistance, but it may enable you to be considered for additional types of assistance. An inspector will contact you to schedule a visit. Be ready to keep your scheduled appointment. Appointments take 30-40 minutes and you must be present. Contact your insurance agent if you have insurance. Prove your identity. Show these documents:-Photo ID: driver’s license or passport.-Proof of occupancy: lease or utility bill.-Proof of ownership: deed, title, mortgage payment book, or tax receipts.(*This is not an exhaustive list.) During the Inspector’s VisitInspectors will…-wear official FEMA ID badges.-confirm your disaster registration number.-review structural and personal property damages.-ask you to sign official documentation.-verify ownership and occupancy. Inspectors won’t….-determine eligibility.-cost any money.-ask for credit card information.-take the place of an insurance inspection. After the Inspector’s visit….You will be sent a decision letter. If approved for aid:-You will receive a check or an electronic funds transfer.-A follow-up letter will explain how the money can be used. If you have questions regarding the letter, you can visit a Disaster Recovery Center in your area (fema.gov/drc) or call us at 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service). For TTY, call 800-462-7585.
A graphic describing what happens after you register for disaster assistance with FEMA. Download Original
 A call from a FEMA inspector. A brief inspector's visit. A decision letter. If you receive a SBA loan application completing it is an important step in finding out what aid may be available to you.
A graphic with info on what to expect after you apply for assistance. The full version can be found here: https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/images/136415. Download Original
 

Filling out the SBA application

Waiting for your insurance settlement to come and need assistance now? Consider applying for an #SBALoan.

Have a question about your #SBA disaster loan application? Call 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service available) and TTY 800-462-7585.

Florida: If you receive a disaster loan application, it is critical that you fill it out completely so FEMA can help you figure out what kind of aid is available to you. If you have questions at any point during the process, call us at 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service available) and TTY 800-462-7585. You can also visit www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL for more information.

 www.disasterassistance.gov 800-621-3362 (711/Video Relay Service) 800-462-7585 (TTY) • You don’t need to wait for an insurance settlement. • For losses not fully covered by insurance. Housing-Related Expenses: • Temporary rental costs. • Repairs to your home to make it safe to live in. • Costs toward a replacement home if your home was destroyed. Medical, Dental, Child Care or Funeral Expenses Disaster Loan from the Small Business Administration: • Completing the application may make you eligible for other types of grants from FEMA. • You don’t have to accept a loan if offered one. • You don’t need to wait for an insurance settlement to apply. Primary Residence: • Repairs to damaged housing. • Up to $200,000. Personal Property: • Clothing, furniture, appliances, vehicles. • Up to $40,000. FEMA: • If you don’t qualify for a loan, you might be eligible for other grants. Other Needs: • Personal property. • Moving and storage. • Transportation. Voluntary Agencies: • You may be referred if you’ve been through the FEMA application process and still have unmet needs. You may appeal if you disagree with FEMA’s decision letter. Call 800-621-3362 to start the process.Updated 8/22/16.FEMA seal.
Sources of Financial Help After a Disaster provides an overview of resources available to disaster survivors, including voluntary agencies, insurance, FEMA assistance, and/or a disaster loan from the Small Business Administration. http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/111650 Download Original
Sources of Financial Help After a Disaster• Insurance• FEMA• Disaster Loan from the Small Business Administration• Voluntary Agencies
This graphic points to the http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/111650 Sources of Financial Help After a Disaster which provides an overview of resources available to disaster survivors, including voluntary agencies, insurance, FEMA assistance, and/or a disaster loan from the Small Business Administration. Download Original
      
 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service)800-462-7585 (TTY)www.disasterassistance.gov
This graphic provides an overview of the disaster assistance process, including voluntary agencies, insurance, FEMA grants, and/or a disaster loan from the Small Business Administration. http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/122899 Download Original
 

Ineligibility

For more information on how to appeal a FEMA decision, visit: www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL.

Florida: If you or someone you know received a denial letter for disaster assistance from Hurricane Irma, you may only be missing small details on your application. Here are a few common reasons applicants are deemed ineligible:

  • Lack of verification of occupancy of the damaged property;
  • Proof of identity;
  • No documentation of disaster damage;
  • Coverage by an insurance policy.

The best way to contact FEMA regarding your denial letter is to visit a Disaster Recovery Center. To locate a center near you visit www.FEMA.gov/DRC. You can also call 800-621-3362 (FEMA). Applicants who use 711 or Video Relay Service may also call 800-621-3362. People who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability and use a TTY may call 800-462-7585. The toll-free numbers are open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week. Multilingual operators are available.

Floridians: If you receive a decision letter from FEMA and you disagree with it, here’s what you should do:

  1. Read the letter carefully to find out why the decision was made. You may just need to provide more information, such as proof of occupancy or an insurance determination letter.
  2. Contact FEMA for help with filing an appeal or any questions. Call 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service) and TTY 800-462-7585 or visit a disaster recovery center near you: www.FEMA.gov/DRC
  3. File a written appeal within 60 days of receiving your decision letter.
What to do if you disagree with FEMA’s decision letter1. Read the letter carefully to find out why the decision was made.Do you need to provide additional information?• Insurance determination letter.• Proof of occupancy or ownership.• Proof of ID.• Applicant’s signature.Common reasons for the initial decision:• The damage was to a secondary home or a rental property, not a primary residence.• Someone else in the household applied and received assistance.• Disaster-related losses could not be verified.• Insurance covered all losses.2. Contact FEMA for help with filing an appeal or any questions.Call800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service available)800-462-7585 (TTY)VisitA Disaster Recovery Center3. File a written appeal.Explain why you think the decision was not correct.• Provide supporting information and documents.• Include your FEMA registration number on all documents.• Sign the letter.Mail or fax your appeal within 60 days of the decision letter date, or drop it off at a Disaster Recovery Center.
This graphic explains the appeals process for individuals who've applied for disaster assistance. The text reads as follows: Download Original
What to do if you disagree with FEMA's decision letter1. Read the letter carefully to find out why the decision was made.2. Contact FEMA for help with filing an appeal or any questions.3. File a written appeal.
This graphic provides an overview of the appeals process for individuals who've applied for disaster assistance. http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/images/111522 Download Original
 

Tracking Storm Damage

Keep these tips in mind as you continue to clean up from #Irma.
Don't wait to clean up storm damage from #Irma. Track your disaster-related costs and take photos & videos of damage.

How to find a DRC

 find a disaster recovery center. Visit FEMA.gov/DRC. Install the FEMA App. Meet one-on-one with FEMA staff at a recovery center or call us at 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service) and TTY 800-621-3362.
This graphic explains two ways survivors can look up disaster recovery center locations in their area. Download Original

FL: Visit a Disaster Recovery Center to get help w/ #Irma recovery and connect w/FEMA, @FLSERT & @SBAgov. More info: www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL

Florida residents: If you were affected by Hurricane Irma, visit a Disaster Recovery Center to meet one-on-one with FEMA, state representatives, and other partners to discuss:

  • Available disaster assistance programs
  • Registering for FEMA assistance
  • Checking the status of your application
  • Getting assistance from state agencies and voluntary organizations
  • U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans for homeowners, renters and businesses

Disaster Recovery Centers also offer assistive technology such as amplified telephones, phones that display text, amplified listening devices for people with hearing loss, and magnifiers for people with vision loss. Video Remote Interpreting is available and in-person sign language is available by request.

Find latest locations and hours on the FEMA app (http://fema.gov/mobile-app) or visit: http://asd.fema.gov/inter/locator/home.htm

For more information about Hurricane Irma Recovery visit: https://www.fema.gov/hurricane-irma

Volunteering / Donating

 How to help after a disaster. The best way to help is with cash donations to trusted organizations. · Cash is efficient, flexible to use, and requires no packaging or transport. · Trusted organizations will ensure your money goes to help those in need.FEMA does not transport donations, please work with a trusted organization.Looking to help after #Irma? Connect with trusted voluntary organizations & confirm what help is needed. Cash is often best.
Thank you for the outpouring of support for #Irma recovery. Please remember cash is best. www.volunteerflorida.org/irma
If you’re looking for information on how to help with the #Irma recovery, follow @VolunteerFla & visit www.volunteerflorida.org/irma

If you’re interested in helping with the Florida’s Hurricane Irma recovery, here are some tips to keep in mind:

  • To help voluntary/nonprofit organizations on the ground, don’t drop off goods without checking what’s needed first.
  • Cash is the best way of donating and offers the greatest flexibility in getting most-needed resources.

For more information on volunteering and donating, visit www.volunteerflorida.org/irma

Thank you for the outpouring of support for Florida’s Hurricane Irma recovery. Please remember that cash is best and visit www.volunteerflorida.org/irma for donation and volunteer opportunities.

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State/Tribal Government or Region: Florida | Region IV

Related Disaster(s):4337

Last Updated: 
10/15/2017 - 13:19