Read FEMA Decision Letters Carefully

Release Date:
June 9, 2022

Carefully Read the Entire Letter

Read your FEMA decision letter from start to finish. If it states you are “ineligible” for assistance or “no decision” can be made at this time, keep reading. The letter will explain what FEMA needs to continue processing your application. Many times, it’s a matter of providing more information or a missing document. Examples of missing documentation may include proof of insurance coverage, a copy of an insurance claim settlement document, proof of identity, proof of occupancy, proof of ownership and/or proof that the damaged property was the applicant’s primary residence when wildfire occurred.

Don’t become discouraged or frustrated. You can appeal FEMA’s decision.

Appeal. It’s Your Right.

You have up to 60 days from the date on your decision letter to submit your appeal. FEMA will review your written appeal and all supporting documentation; it will then either provide a written decision on your case or request more information.

Here are some tips to help the review process go faster:

  • Appeals must be in writing, signed and dated.
  • If someone other than the applicant or co-applicant writes the appeal letter, that person must sign your appeal. In addition, the applicant needs to include a signed statement authorizing the individual to act on his or her behalf.
  • Include documents that support your case.
  • Include your FEMA registration number and the disaster declaration number (DR-4652) on every page.
  • If you aren’t sure about the process or have questions, you can call the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362; specialists are available from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. local time, seven days a week. visit a local Disaster Recovery Center or

How to file your appeal

  • Mail: FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program National Processing Service Center, P.O. Box 10055, Hyattsville, MD. 20782-7055.
  • Fax: 1-800-827-8112.
  • Upload: Log onto to your FEMA account or create an account at disasterassistance.gov, click on “Check Status” and follow the directions.

To address many of the common myths and rumors during the New Mexico wildfires, FEMA activated a rumor/myth webpage. You can access it online at fema.gov/nm-rumors.

For the latest information visit fema.gov/disaster/4652. Follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6 or on Facebook at facebook.com/FEMARegion6/.

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Last updated June 9, 2022