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Collection: Iowa 2008 Tornadoes and Flooding - 10 Years Later

Updated visual collection of the DR1763 Disaster Declaration
Collection Created:
junio 21, 2018
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  • <p style="margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in">In the summer of 2008, much of the state of Iowa was under siege from tornadoes, severe storms and flooding.&nbsp; As a result, 85 of Iowa&rsquo;s 99 counties were designated for federal disaster assistance.&nbsp; Beth Freeman experienced the 2008 flooding first-hand when her community of Cedar Rapids was devastated.&nbsp; She then went on to oversee FEMA funding for thousands of recovery projects throughout the state.&nbsp; Hear her story &hellip; and how a decade of resilient actions has better prepared Iowa for future disasters.</p>

    10 Years After Disaster: A First-Hand Look at Iowa’s Historic Flood Recovery

    Audio by Barb Sturner

    In the summer of 2008, much of the state of Iowa was under siege from tornadoes, severe storms and flooding.  As a result, 85 of Iowa’s 99 counties were designated for federal disaster assistance.  Beth Freeman experienced the 2008 flooding first-hand when her community of Cedar Rapids was devastated.  She then went on to oversee FEMA funding for thousands of recovery projects throughout the state.  Hear her story … and how a decade of resilient actions has better prepared Iowa for future disasters.

  • <p style="margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in">In the summer of 2008, the University of Iowa suffered a disaster beyond imagination.&nbsp; The usually scenic Iowa River that winds through campus became a formidable enemy to the state&rsquo;s largest higher-education institution when it raged beyond its banks to historic flood levels, damaging more than 22 campus buildings.&nbsp; The university had to move quickly &ndash; not only to stay in business but to begin what would become an eight-year journey of recovery.&nbsp; University Architect Rod Lehnertz, who led the campus restoration, tells that story of recovery, the lessons learned and how the university is fighting back to minimize the impact of future floods.&nbsp;</p>

    10 Years After Disaster: The University of Iowa Stands Tall in Flood Protection

    Audio by Barb Sturner

    In the summer of 2008, the University of Iowa suffered a disaster beyond imagination.  The usually scenic Iowa River that winds through campus became a formidable enemy to the state’s largest higher-education institution when it raged beyond its banks to historic flood levels, damaging more than 22 campus buildings.  The university had to move quickly – not only to stay in business but to begin what would become an eight-year journey of recovery.  University Architect Rod Lehnertz, who led the campus restoration, tells that story of recovery, the lessons learned and how the university is fighting back to minimize the impact of future floods. 

  • <p style="margin-left:0in; margin-right:0in">The summers of 1993 and 2008 have one thing in common:&nbsp; Historic, devastating floods.&nbsp; The state of Iowa was severely impacted by both events.&nbsp; John Miller had a unique, front-row seat to both disasters &ndash; first as a FEMA Regional Administrator who oversaw the agency&rsquo;s role in much of the 1993 flood recovery for four Midwestern states &ndash; and then as a local official for Black Hawk County, Iowa in 2008 when floods would again devastate the state.&nbsp; Hear his unique perspective of how two events, 15 years apart, caused changes to better protect lives and property, and the steps others can take to continue forging a more resilient nation.&nbsp;</p>

    Living History: How Two Devastating Disasters Changed Iowa and the Nation – For the Better

    Audio by Barb Sturner

    The summers of 1993 and 2008 have one thing in common:  Historic, devastating floods.  The state of Iowa was severely impacted by both events.  John Miller had a unique, front-row seat to both disasters – first as a FEMA Regional Administrator who oversaw the agency’s role in much of the 1993 flood recovery for four Midwestern states – and then as a local official for Black Hawk County, Iowa in 2008 when floods would again devastate the state.  Hear his unique perspective of how two events, 15 years apart, caused changes to better protect lives and property, and the steps others can take to continue forging a more resilient nation.