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Georgia Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds (DR-4294)

Incident Period: January 02, 2017
Major Disaster Declaration declared on January 25, 2017

Individual Assistance Applications
Approved: 321

Total Individual & Households Program
Dollars Approved: $631,364.39

Total Public Assistance Grants
Dollars Obligated: $15,432,996.17


A survivor home badly damage by a tornado.

Stay in Touch

After you apply, we may need to contact you to schedule an inspection or to get additional information to help process your application. Let us know as soon as possible if you’ve moved or have a new phone number.

Update contact information online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by 800-621-3362 (711 or Video Relay Service). If you use TTY, call 800-462-7585.

Other Language Resources:

Beware of Fraud & Scams When Seeking Disaster Assistance

FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance personnel walks towards a survivor's house.

After a disaster scam artists, identity thieves and other criminals may attempt to prey on vulnerable survivors. The most common post-disaster fraud practices include phony housing inspectors, fraudulent building contractors, bogus pleas for disaster donations and fake offers of state or federal aid.

Survivors should keep in mind:

  • Federal and state workers never ask for, or accept money, and always carry identification badges
  • There is NO FEE required to apply for or to get disaster assistance from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration or the state
  • Scam attempts can be made over the phone, by mail or email, text or in person

Price Gouging

Price gouging occurs when a supplier marks up the price of an item more than is justified by his actual costs. Survivors are particularly susceptible because their needs are immediate, and have few alternatives to choose from. If you find price gouging, contact your State's Office of the Attorney General.

Dealing with Contractors:

Survivors should take steps to protect themselves and avoid fraud when hiring contractors to clean property, remove debris or make repairs.

Simple rules to avoid becoming a victim of fraud:

  • Only use contractors licensed by your state
  • Get a written estimate and get more than one estimate
  • Demand and check references
  • Ask for proof of insurance
    • i.e., liability and Workmen's Compensation
  • Insist on a written contract and refuse to sign a contract with blank spaces
  • Get any guarantees in writing
  • Make final payments only after the work is completed
  • Pay by check.

The best way to avoid fraud is to arm yourself against it by having a checklist to remind you of what you need to demand when hiring a contractor.

Charitable Giving Scams

Donating money or supplies to the relief effort is another way to help survivors. Be alert to scams during an emergency. Learn more about donating.

If you are aware of a potential charity scam, you can report it to the state consumer affairs or attorney general's office:

Those who question the validity of a contact or suspect fraud are encouraged to call the toll free FEMA Disaster Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721. Complaints also may be made by contacting local law enforcement agencies.

What to Expect After You Apply

What to Expect After You Apply for FEMA Aid• A call from a FEMA Inspector• A brief Inspector's visit• A decision letter

Once homeowners register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a FEMA housing inspector will call to schedule an inspection for those living in designated counties. Here’s what survivors need to know about the inspection process:

Everyone should know:

  • The FEMA inspector will show a photo ID badge.
  • If you are not shown photo identification, then do not allow the inspection.
  • If you suspect someone is posing as a FEMA inspector, call your local law enforcement agency.
  • You may receive visits from more than one inspector. Other inspectors may represent federal, state, parish and local government agencies, the U.S. Small Business Administration, the National Flood Insurance Program and/or insurance companies.       
  • Representatives of volunteer agencies may contact you to offer their services.

Before the FEMA inspection, it’s important that you know:

  • An adult 18 or older who lived in the residence before the disaster must be present for the inspection.
  • That person must have the following documents:
    • Photo identification;
    • Proof of ownership and occupancy of the damaged residence such as: property tax bill; mortgage payment bill or receipt, or utility service bill;
    • Homeowner and vehicle insurance documents;
    • List of persons living in residence at time of disaster that you compiled; and
    • List of disaster damage to the home and its contents that you compiled.

Most important to know:

  • You cannot get an inspection without registering with FEMA.
    • Call 800-621-FEMA (3362). For TTY call 800-462-7585. People who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS) can call   800-621-3362.
    • You can register online at www.disasterassistance.gov.
    • You can register with FEMA at a Disaster Recovery Center.

How You Can Help

 How to help after a disaster. The best way to help is with cash donations to trusted organizations. · Cash is efficient, flexible to use, and requires no packaging or transport. · Trusted organizations will ensure your money goes to help those in need.

When disaster strikes, every little bit helps. To make the most of your contributions, please follow our guidelines to learn the most effective and safest ways to donate cash, goods, or time following a disaster.

  • Cash is best. Financial contributions to recognized disaster relief organizations are the fastest, most flexible, and most effective method of donating. Organizations on the ground know what items and quantities are needed, often buy in bulk with discounts and, if possible, purchase through area businesses which supports economic recovery.
  • Confirm donations needed. Critical needs change rapidly – confirm needed items BEFORE collecting; pack and label carefully; confirm delivery locations; arrange transportation. Unsolicited goods NOT needed burden local organizations’ ability to meet survivors’ confirmed needs, drawing away valuable volunteer labor, transportation, and warehouse space.
  • Connect to volunteer. Trusted organizations operating in the affected area know where volunteers are needed, and can ensure appropriate volunteer safety, training, and housing.

Financial Assistance

Individual Assistance - Dollars Approved

$631,364.39

Total Individual & Households Program (IHP) - Dollars Approved*

$458,957.44

Total Housing Assistance (HA) - Dollars Approved*

$172,406.95

Total Other Needs Assistance (ONA) - Dollars Approved*

321

Total Individual Assistance (IA) - Applications Approved*

Public Assistance - Dollars Approved

$15,432,996.17

Total Public Assistance Grants (PA) - Dollars Obligated✝

$8,915,178.86

Emergency Work (Categories A-B) - Dollars Obligated✝

$6,424,799.31

Permanent Work (Categories C-G) - Dollars Obligated✝

* Dollars Approved: Assistance dollars approved but not necessarily disbursed.
✝ Dollars Obligated: Funds made available to the State via electronic transfer following FEMA's final review and approval of Public Assistance projects.

Learn more about FEMA Disaster definitions. Information is updated every 24 hours.

Preliminary Damage Assessment Report

PDA Report; FEMA-4294-DR

 

Related Links

Last Updated: 2017-01-25 05:00