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DHS Approved Programs

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Approved Programs
(for use of authorities provided in
section 101 of the Defense Production Act)

In accordance with subsection 202(c) of Executive Order 13603, the DHS programs listed below have been determined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency Associate Administrator for the Office of Policy and Program Analysis to be necessary or appropriate to promote the national defense and are, thereby, eligible to be supported using the priorities and allocations authorities provided in section 101 of the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended [50 U.S.C. § 4511].  For the purposes of the Federal Priorities and Allocations System (FPAS) regulations and other FPAS guidance and procedures, these programs are commonly referred to as “DHS Approved Programs.”

  1. Programs involving emergency preparedness activities conducted pursuant to title VI of the Stafford Act.  Such activities include activities and measures designed or undertaken to prepare for or minimize the effects of a hazard  upon the civilian population, to deal with the immediate emergency conditions which would be created by the hazard, and to effectuate emergency repairs to, or the emergency restoration of, vital utilities and facilities destroyed or damaged by the hazard.
  2. Intelligence and warning systems to counter terrorism within the United States.  This includes intelligence and warning systems that help to: (1) prevent terrorist attacks within the United States; (2) reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; (3) minimize damage from a terrorist attack in the United States; and (4) recover from a terrorist attack in the United States.
  3. Border and transportation security programs to counter terrorism within the United States.  This includes border and transportation security programs that help to: (1) prevent terrorist attacks within the United States; (2) reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; (3) minimize damage from a terrorist attack in the United States; and (4) recover from a terrorist attack in the United States.
  4. Programs to address chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats within the United States.  This includes programs to prevent, prepare for, respond to, recover from, or mitigate these threats, whether resulting from natural or man-caused events.
  5. Other programs, including law enforcement, to counter terrorism within the United States.  This includes programs that help to: (1) prevent terrorist attacks within the United States; (2) reduce the vulnerability of the United States to terrorism; (3) minimize damage from a terrorist attack in the United States; and (4) recover from a terrorist attack in the United States.
  6. Programs to protect or restore critical infrastructure.  U.S. critical infrastructure includes any systems and assets, whether physical or cyber-based, so vital to the United States that the degradation or destruction of such systems and assets would have a debilitating impact on national security, including, but not limited to, national economic security and national public health or safety.
  7. Federal Government continuity programs and functions.  These include: (1) development, operation, training, exercise, and assessment of Continuity of Operations and Continuity of Government programs; (2) development, operation, training, exercise, and assessment of the Emergency Alert System and the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System; and (3) development, testing, implementation, and sustainment of national security and emergency preparedness communications capabilities that are survivable, resilient, and enduring.

 

Last Updated: 
08/13/2018 - 13:46