Fact Sheets

New Mexicans with uninsured losses should apply for FEMA Individual Assistance as soon as possible. Residents who have insurance should file their insurance claims prior to applying with FEMA.

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New Mexico residents should be aware that con artists and criminals may try to obtain money or steal personal information through fraud, scams or identity theft. In some cases, thieves try to apply with FEMA using names, addresses and Social Security numbers they have stolen from residents affected by a disaster.

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Effective April 4, 2022, the Federal Government transitioned from using the Data Universal Numbering System or DUNS number, to a new, non-proprietary identifier known as a Unique Entity Identifier, or UEI. For entities that have an active registration in the System for Award Management (SAM).gov prior to April 4, the UEI has automatically been assigned and no action is necessary. For all entities filing a new registration in SAM.gov after April 4, 2022, the UEI will be assigned to that entity as part of the SAM.gov registration process.

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All New Mexico residents affected by the ongoing wildfires who apply for FEMA assistance will receive a letter from FEMA stating an eligibility decision and the reason for it. Residents can also check the status of their applications online at disasterassistance.gov, which is the fastest way to get information to and from FEMA.

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If FEMA sent you a letter saying you are ineligible for assistance after the wildfires damaged your home, you still have options. People are considered ineligible typically for one of several common reasons. Often, you can appeal FEMA’s initial decision and possibly become eligible for assistance.

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The fiscal year (FY) 2022 Homeland Security Grant Program (HSGP) is one of three grant programs that support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) focus on enhancing the ability of state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as nonprofit organizations, to prevent, prepare for, protect against, and respond to acts of terrorism.

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Frequently asked questions on the Fiscal Year 2022 Transit Security Grant Program.

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Frequently asked questions on the Fiscal Year 2022 Tribal Homeland Security Grant Program.

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The FY 2022 Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP) is one of three grant programs that support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency’s focus on enhancing the ability of state, local, tribal and territorial governments, as well as nonprofit organizations, to prevent, prepare for, protect against, and respond to terrorist attacks. These grant programs are part of a comprehensive set of measures authorized by Congress and implemented by DHS to help strengthen the nation’s communities against potential terrorist attacks. The NSGP provides funding to nonprofit organizations at high risk of a terrorist attack for facility hardening and other physical security enhancements and activities.

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In fiscal year (FY) 2022, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is providing $15 million to enhance the ability of tribal nations to prevent, protect against, respond to and recover from potential terrorist attacks and other hazards.

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Last updated November 2, 2020