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Bolinski received the 2022 Distinguished Service Award at the National Hurricane Conference in Orlando, Florida.  He received the award for the work he does to provide hurricane preparedness, hurricane planning and operational response and decision training making for federal, state and local partners.

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As the climate changes, FEMA is adapting to meet new challenges. Focusing on preserving the environment is just one of the many ways we are confronting the impacts of climate change. Director of the Office of Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) Kristin Fontenot is one of the people on the frontline of these efforts.

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Now more than ever it is important to consider how we can move to a more green, inclusive and resilient future. As the climate changes, disasters like flooding are increasing in strength and frequency. FEMA is adapting to meet these new flood challenges to help you protect your community and improve the safety of the buildings you live, work and gather in. If you’re a leader in your community, here are the top five ways you can make a difference using FEMA tools.

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Many people spend time in churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, gurdwaras or other places of worship and public spaces. People should feel safe when they gather to express their faith or serve their community. As we continue to learn from faith and community leaders how to improve the safety and security of these spaces, we identified five ways your community can get started today.

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On Aug. 29, President Biden directed DHS to lead and coordinate efforts across the federal government to support vulnerable Afghans — including many who had worked alongside us in Afghanistan for the past 20 years — as they safely resettle in the U.S. This mission is known as Operation Allies Welcome.

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On April 1, FEMA turned 43. Over the past four decades, the agency has seen many changes. One thing that has not changed is the strength, passion and determination of the FEMA workforce. Together, we have worked to improve the way things are done, reach people where they are and build more resilient communities.

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Thaddaeus Vasquez was pursuing a career in IT when he quickly realized that he did not enjoy sitting at a desk all day. After a conversation with a professor, he instead was inspired to take an emergency management training program with Job Corps.

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Photographs are a powerful storytelling tool that can stir emotions and put a human face on the effects of disasters. By showing the scope of a disaster and the work done to help survivors, FEMA photographers are in the unique position of telling FEMA’s story when words fail the imagination.

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National Level Exercise (NLE) 2022 examined the ability of all levels of government, private industry, and NGOs to respond to and recover from a large rupture along the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) fault line that runs along the Pacific coastal states.

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At FEMA, there is no short supply of women who have helped shape the emergency management field. This includes incredible women like Federal Coordinating Officer Lai Sun Yee, who responded after the September 11 attacks, and FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell, who is the first woman to serve as the FEMA Administrator. This month, we honor these women in celebration of Women’s History Month. Below we have highlighted just a few of the incredible women that make up the FEMA workforce.

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