Blog

In June 2021, southeast Michigan faced destructive flooding that impacted a large area of Detroit and surrounding communities. As a part of the recovery process, Long Term Recovery Groups (LTRGs) were formed, with assistance from Michigan State Police Emergency Management division, FEMA, and the Michigan Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD).

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Leyda Becker is an expert on immigrants and refugees who come from all over the world in search of a new life in Kentucky. As the international communities liaison for the City of Bowling Green, Becker knows where they live, what languages they speak and their cultural needs.

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Are you an entrepreneurial analytics professional interested in using data to help the government prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters? Region 9 of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be hiring for several new analytics positions to strengthen the Region’s ability to tackle disaster-related challenges.

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On a rainy day, when streets were flooding and muddy streams were flowing fast, a team of FEMA hazard mitigation specialists arrived at Taylor County High School to demonstrate the destructive power of water.

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Bolinski received the 2022 Distinguished Service Award at the National Hurricane Conference in Orlando, Florida.  He received the award for the work he does to provide hurricane preparedness, hurricane planning and operational response and decision training making for federal, state and local partners.

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As the climate changes, FEMA is adapting to meet new challenges. Focusing on preserving the environment is just one of the many ways we are confronting the impacts of climate change. Director of the Office of Environmental Planning and Historic Preservation (EHP) Kristin Fontenot is one of the people on the frontline of these efforts.

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Now more than ever it is important to consider how we can move to a more green, inclusive and resilient future. As the climate changes, disasters like flooding are increasing in strength and frequency. FEMA is adapting to meet these new flood challenges to help you protect your community and improve the safety of the buildings you live, work and gather in. If you’re a leader in your community, here are the top five ways you can make a difference using FEMA tools.

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Many people spend time in churches, mosques, synagogues, temples, gurdwaras or other places of worship and public spaces. People should feel safe when they gather to express their faith or serve their community. As we continue to learn from faith and community leaders how to improve the safety and security of these spaces, we identified five ways your community can get started today.

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On Aug. 29, President Biden directed DHS to lead and coordinate efforts across the federal government to support vulnerable Afghans — including many who had worked alongside us in Afghanistan for the past 20 years — as they safely resettle in the U.S. This mission is known as Operation Allies Welcome.

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On April 1, FEMA turned 43. Over the past four decades, the agency has seen many changes. One thing that has not changed is the strength, passion and determination of the FEMA workforce. Together, we have worked to improve the way things are done, reach people where they are and build more resilient communities.

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Last updated September 9, 2021