Blog

FEMA Deputy Administrator Erik A. Hooks discusses the Great ShakeOut – and why you should participate in the international earthquake drill.

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October is National Community Planning Month, where we highlight the importance of mitigation planning in everyday life. Planning is the best step state, local, tribal and territorial governments can take to build a safer tomorrow. It helps us assess natural hazard risk in their communities and understand how it is changing. Planning also allows us to craft an equitable process that builds long-term, risk informed plans.

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After a disaster, you may feel overwhelmed and unsure of how to move forward. The road to recovery can be intimidating, but you are not alone. It’s important to ask for help as you navigate each step of the process. One of the best places to get direct help is at a Disaster Recovery Center (DRC).

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When communities come together after disasters like Hurricane Ian, we are reminded that recovery is a whole community effort.  From creating shelter space to providing comfort dogs, there are many ways response organizations come forward to aid in the recovery process. Every day, FEMA is honored to work with these voluntary, faith-based and private sector partners to help those affected by disasters.

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Disasters can leave behind a trail of destruction. Sometimes, this includes items in your home that hold great sentimental, historic or monetary value to you or a family member. Here are four steps save your family treasures after a disaster.

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Millions of Americans across the country have been affected by disasters, from Alaska to Puerto Rico, from Florida to South Carolina. FEMA is not slowing down as it continues to respond and help disaster survivors.

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When a disaster strikes, it is people coming together to help that brings hope to survivors. Hurricanes Fiona and Ian left trails of catastrophic destruction, uprooting the lives of millions. The recovery will be long, grueling and costly. It will take the efforts of countless people to help affected communities recover – from all levels of government to non-profit organizations to generous individuals like you.

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People may face different challenges during a disaster, depending on their individual circumstances. As we recover from Hurricane Ian, there are some actions people with disabilities and older adults with medical conditions can take to care for their unique needs.

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Hurricane Ian is bearing down on Florida, bringing life-threating storm surge, powerful winds and the possibility of flash floods. Most of Florida, as well as southern states, will be affected by the hurricane. It is important to listen to local officials if they recommend that you evacuate. If you are unable to evacuate or if you are told to shelter-in-place, here are some last-minute ways you can prepare.

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Carson City became Nevada’s second community to participate in FEMA’s High Water Mark Initiative. This initiative helps communities increase local awareness of flood risk by posting high water mark signs to help educate the public and encourage mitigation action.

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Last updated September 9, 2021