FEMA Sends $33 Million To State For Repairs At Waterbury State Office Complex

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Release date: 
September 27, 2013
Release Number: 
NR 098

Agency Also Sends $5.3 Million For Vermont’s Irene-Related Administrative Costs

WILLISTON, Vt. – The Federal Emergency Management Agency has put $33 million into the state’s coffers to repair damage at the Waterbury State Office Complex caused by flooding from Tropical Storm Irene. 

Roughly $33 million of Public Assistance funding represents FEMA’s 90 percent reimbursement of a total eligible cost to the State of $36.3 million to perform work on approximately 40 buildings and tunnels at the Waterbury State Office Complex.

“This is not a case of saying ‘The check is in the mail,’” said Federal Coordinating Officer Mark Landry, the head of FEMA’s operations in Vermont. “The money is in the bank.”

FEMA and the state announced in late August that of the estimated $225 million total price tag for the cleanup, renovation and new construction associated with the Waterbury State Office Complex and Vermont State Hospital, more than $66 million in costs will be eligible for FEMA Public Assistance reimbursement.

“Getting this money so quickly is terrific news for the state,” said Administration Secretary Jeb Spaulding. “This means that we can draw down these funds immediately to pay for the work being done in Waterbury.”

The $33 million of Public Assistance funding represents the bulk of outstanding funds for the Waterbury State Office Complex and Vermont State Hospital projects.

In addition, FEMA sent the state approximately $5.3 million to cover administrative and grant management expenses related to Vermont’s recovery from Tropical Storm Irene. 

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FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Last Updated: 
September 30, 2013 - 10:56
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