Disaster Aid For Tennessee's Tornado Recovery Reaches $8.4 Million

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Release date: 
March 17, 2008
Release Number: 
1745-034

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- More than $8.4 million has been approved in federal disaster assistance as grants and loans to Tennesseans recovering from last month?s severe storms and tornadoes.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) report that more than 4,243 Tennesseans in
18 counties have registered for individual assistance.??

Below are key recovery numbers as of Monday, March 17:

  • $2,984,402 has been approved through FEMA's Individuals and Households Program for housing assistance, including rental assistance and repairs to homes for eligible applicants. Of that, $2,146,509 is for housing assistance and $837,893 is to help applicants cover other essential disaster-related needs.

  • $5,472,600 in loans to homeowners, renters and business owners has been approved by the U.S. Small Business Administration(SBA).

  • 2,890 residents have visited Disaster Recovery Centers operated jointly by FEMA and the state of Tennessee.

  • 2,232 home inspections have been completed.

SBA is the federal government's primary source of money for the long-term rebuilding of disaster-damaged private property. SBA helps homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes, and private non-profit organizations fund repairs or rebuilding efforts, and cover the cost of replacing lost or  disaster-damaged personal property. These disaster loans cover uninsured and uncompensated losses and do not duplicate benefits of other agencies or organizations. For information about SBA programs, applicants may call (800) 659-2955 or online at www.sba.gov.

FEMA coordinates the federal government's role in preparing for, preventing, mitigating the effects of, responding to, and recovering from all domestic disasters, whether natural or man-made, including acts of terror.

Last Updated: 
July 16, 2012 - 18:46
State/Tribal Government or Region: 
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