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FEMA Public Assistance to New York Tops $1 Million

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Release date: 
June 27, 2007
Release Number: 

ALBANY, N.Y. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has obligated more than $1 million in Public Assistance (PA) funds to help New York counties repair flood damage and rebuild infrastructure damaged or destroyed in the April nor'easter.

This represents 75 percent of the cost of approved public assistance projects. The remaining 25 percent will be paid by the State of New York.

"With these Public Assistance funds, FEMA is helping New Yorkers recover from the damaging floods," said FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer Marianne C. Jackson. "FEMA and New York State continue to work with the affected counties to clean up and rebuild damaged infrastructure."

These monies include grants awarded to date and more funding will be approved as work projects are completed. Public Assistance (PA) funds have been obligated for the following jurisdictions:

Albany $5,976
Columbia $12,307
Dutchess $53,678
Essex $168,400
Greene $11,881
Montgomery $13,347
Schoharie $34,633
Ulster $1,005
Orange $125,927
Putnam $24,638
Rockland $35,601
Suffolk $32,298
Westchester $583,702
TOTAL $1,103,397

Many of the approved PA projects fund debris removal, a major undertaking for local governments after floodwaters recede.

Public Assistance funds are available to state and local governments and certain private non-profits to respond to and recover from disasters. PA funds may be provided to reimburse costs incurred for emergency actions taken during and immediately after a disaster to protect life and property, to conduct debris removal and to restore disaster-damaged infrastructure.

FEMA coordinates the federal government's role in preparing for, preventing, mitigating the effects of, responding to, and recovering from all domestic disasters, whether natural or man-made, including acts of terror.

Last Updated: 
February 5, 2013 - 14:33
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