Be Prepared: Flooding

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Release date: 
February 14, 2007
Release Number: 
1675-005

Flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Flooding can happen in every U.S. state and territory. However, all floods are not alike. Some can develop slowly during an extended period of rain, or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Others, such as flash floods, can occur quickly, even without any visible signs of rain. Be prepared for flooding no matter where you live, but particularly if you are in a low-lying area, near water or downstream from a dam. Even a very small stream or dry creek bed can overflow and create flooding.

Prepare for Flooding

  • Elevate the furnace, water heater, and electric panel in your home if you live in an area that has a high flood risk.
  • Consider installing "check valves" to prevent flood water from backing up into the drains of your home.
  • If feasible, construct barriers to stop floodwater from entering the building and seal walls in basements with waterproofing compounds.
  • Property insurance does not typically cover flood damage. Talk to your insurance provider about your policy and consider if you need additional coverage.
  • Get a kit of emergency supplies and prepare a portable kit in case you have to evacuate.
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a thunderstorm hazard, including understanding the difference between a severe thunderstorm watch and a severe thunderstorm warning.
    • A flood watch or flash flood watch means there is a possibility of flooding or a flash flood in your area.
      • Be prepared to evacuate.
      • If time allows, bring in outside furniture and move your valuables to higher places in your home.
      • Unplug electrical appliances, moving them to higher levels, if possible. However, do not touch an electric appliance if you are wet or standing in water.
      • If you have a car, fill the gas tank in case you have to evacuate.
    • A flood warning means a flood is occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to evacuate do so immediately.
    • A flash flood warning means a flash flood is occurring. Seek higher ground immediately; do not wait for instructions.
  • Visit NOAA Watch (www.noaawatch.gov) for more weather-related information.

Plan to Evacuate

  • Plan how you will leave and where you will go if you are advised to evacuate.
  • If you do not have a car, plan alternate means of evacuating.
  • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
  • Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
  • Take your emergency supply kit.
  • Lock the door behind you.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for information.
  • Do not walk through moving water, if possible. Look for areas where the water is not moving. What might seem like a small amount of moving water can easily knock you down.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. If your vehicle becomes surrounded by rising water, get out quickly and move to higher ground, if possible. Stay Informed
  • If it has been raining hard for several hours or if it has been raining steadily for days there may be the potential for flooding. Use common sense and available information. If water is rising quickly or you see a moving wall of mud or debris, immediately move to higher ground.
  • Stay out of flood waters, if possible. The water may be contaminated or electrically charged. However, should you find yourself...
Last Updated: 
July 16, 2012 - 18:46
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