National Flood Insurance Coverage Available To Homeowners, Renters And Business Owners

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Release date: 
August 14, 2002
Release Number: 
1425-68

San Antonio, TX -- In the wake of the Texas floods of 2002, officials are reminding Texas residents that they may purchase flood insurance coverage through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) administered by the Federal Insurance Administration.

"Year after year, flooding is the leading cause of property loss from natural disasters," Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Federal Coordinating Officer Scott Wells said. "But all too often, homeowners learn after the fact that protection against flood loss is not part of their normal insurance protection package."

"Of the more than 20,000 individuals affected by the Texas floods who registered for assistance, about 90 percent indicated that they do not have insurance coverage for damages," said Texas Division of Emergency Management, Department of Public Safety, State Coordinating Officer Duke Mazurek.

Flood damage is not normally covered by homeowner policies although disaster statistics show that when it comes to the risk of flood damage everyone is vulnerable. In fact, 25 percent of all flood insurance claims come from low-to-moderate risk areas.

Renters, homeowners and businesses throughout Texas can purchase flood insurance coverage provided by the NFIP. Flood insurance coverage is available for commercial and residential buildings as well as for contents. However, their community must participate in the NFIP.

"Maintaining a flood insurance policy is one of the most important things you can do to protect yourself from future flooding disasters," Mazurek said. "There is no need to subject yourself to the suffering and expense of flood damage. Flood insurance is easy to get, and available-regardless of risk."

Contact your local insurance agent about the availability of national flood insurance or call toll-free, 800-427-4661.

Last Updated: 
July 16, 2012 - 18:46
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