Collection: Hurricane Ike - Texas

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Declared: 09/13/2008
Collection Created:
September 20, 2013
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  • Picture slideshow highlighting Hurricane Ike Recovery efforts in Texas.

    Hurricane Ike Photo Essay

    Video by Daniel Green
    Picture slideshow highlighting Hurricane Ike Recovery efforts in Texas.
  • Hurricane Ike impacted the upper Gulf Coast on September 13, 2008. The people and communities have worked relentlessly to recover from the storm and rebuild their lives

    Ike one year Later

    Video by Daniel Llargues
    Hurricane Ike impacted the upper Gulf Coast on September 13, 2008. The people and communities have worked relentlessly to recover from the storm and rebuild their lives
  • The alligator capital of Texas was severely damaged due to Hurricane Ike. The biggest annual event of Anahuac, Texas was cancelled in September 2008.
As the community gets back to normal they celebrate Gator Fest 2009

    Gator Fest

    Video by Daniel Llargues
    The alligator capital of Texas was severely damaged due to Hurricane Ike. The biggest annual event of Anahuac, Texas was cancelled in September 2008. As the community gets back to normal they celebrate Gator Fest 2009
  • Hurricane Ike took a massive amount of debris from the Bolivar Peninsula and deposited it on Goat Island. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) work together to sort through the debris and remove hazardous materials that could harm the environment. FEMA pays for the endeavor. Gary Moore, EPA, and Jeff Lewellin, TCEQ, introduce us to the process.

    Hurricane Ike Hazardous Material Cleanup

    Video by Mark Meytin
    Hurricane Ike took a massive amount of debris from the Bolivar Peninsula and deposited it on Goat Island. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) work together to sort through the debris and remove hazardous materials that could harm the environment. FEMA pays for the endeavor. Gary Moore, EPA, and Jeff Lewellin, TCEQ, introduce us to the process.
  • Americorps NCCC is a volunteer organization for young people interested in community service. After Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast, the young people of Americorps were there to help FEMA help people in the recovery effort.

    Americorps Volunteers Pitch in After Hurricane Ike

    Video by Mark Meytin
    Americorps NCCC is a volunteer organization for young people interested in community service. After Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast, the young people of Americorps were there to help FEMA help people in the recovery effort.
  • El huracan Ike impacto las costas del Golfo de Mexico el 13 de septiembre de 2008. Las comunidades afectadas han trabajado sin parar para recuperarse de la tormenta y reconstruir sus vidas.

    Un ano despues del huracan Ike

    Video by Daniel Llargues
    El huracan Ike impacto las costas del Golfo de Mexico el 13 de septiembre de 2008. Las comunidades afectadas han trabajado sin parar para recuperarse de la tormenta y reconstruir sus vidas.
  • Hurricane Ike hit the Bolivar Peninsula and left tremendous damage behind. Massive amounts of debris were piled up and await the beginning of the clean-up process. FEMA funds provide for a specially trained team of experts to comb through the debris piles one last time to ensure no one missing from Hurricane Ike is still left undiscovered.

    Working Dog Searches for Missing in Bolivar Debris

    Video by Mark Meytin
    Hurricane Ike hit the Bolivar Peninsula and left tremendous damage behind. Massive amounts of debris were piled up and await the beginning of the clean-up process. FEMA funds provide for a specially trained team of experts to comb through the debris piles one last time to ensure no one missing from Hurricane Ike is still left undiscovered.
  • Hurricane Ike survivor, Jeanne Leslie, has been living in a FEMA provided Temporary Housing Unit since the storm destroyed her house in San Leon, Texas. After a little more than a year of residing in this unit while deciding whether to repair, rebuild or replace her damaged home, FEMA gave Leslie the option of purchasing this mobile home for her permanent use.

Jeanne shares her experience and thanks in this short video of a survivor's success story.

    Temporary House To Home

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    Hurricane Ike survivor, Jeanne Leslie, has been living in a FEMA provided Temporary Housing Unit since the storm destroyed her house in San Leon, Texas. After a little more than a year of residing in this unit while deciding whether to repair, rebuild or replace her damaged home, FEMA gave Leslie the option of purchasing this mobile home for her permanent use. Jeanne shares her experience and thanks in this short video of a survivor's success story.
  • Temporary Housing Units provide a short-term solution for disaster survivors whose homes or apartments are destroyed. Hurricane Ike hit Texas in September of 2008. The first Community Site named the Acadian Annex was opened by FEMA in January 2009 in response to housing needs in Bridge City, Texas.

Originally housing 40 units, the Acadian Annex Community Site has now closed one year and one month later. The residents there have all found more permanent housing solutions for their families. The homes have all been removed and the site has been returned to the original owner of the property.

    Acadian Closing

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    Temporary Housing Units provide a short-term solution for disaster survivors whose homes or apartments are destroyed. Hurricane Ike hit Texas in September of 2008. The first Community Site named the Acadian Annex was opened by FEMA in January 2009 in response to housing needs in Bridge City, Texas. Originally housing 40 units, the Acadian Annex Community Site has now closed one year and one month later. The residents there have all found more permanent housing solutions for their families. The homes have all been removed and the site has been returned to the original owner of the property.
  • Galveston depends a great deal on tourism in order to survive. When Hurricane Ike hit in September 2008, many of the main attractions of Galveston were damaged and have been closed since. The recovery from such a disaster is an ongoing arduous process, but worthwhile for the communities depending on the revenue and in this case, keeping the rich history of our country alive.

    Galveston Railroad Museum

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    Galveston depends a great deal on tourism in order to survive. When Hurricane Ike hit in September 2008, many of the main attractions of Galveston were damaged and have been closed since. The recovery from such a disaster is an ongoing arduous process, but worthwhile for the communities depending on the revenue and in this case, keeping the rich history of our country alive.
  • In 1898, along with federal development of the Port of Galveston, construction on the present Fort Travis was begun. The fort was completed in 1899 and heavily damaged during the 1900 storm. Repairs included the present 15 foot sea wall. During World War I Fort Travis garrisoned troops defending the Port of Galveston and its approaches. 

In 1942, the fort was enlarged and 2,500 troops were stationed there. When the war ended, Fort Travis was declared surplus property, dismantled, and in 1949 sold to private interests. The 60 acre park was acquired through a Moody Foundation grant in 1976 and is operated by the Galveston County Beach and Parks Department. 

Hurricane Ike in 2008 destroyed much of the promenade, sidewalks, and portions of the caretaker's house originally used to house Generals serving at Fort Travis. The collaborative effort of several FEMA components are displayed in this video as they begin repairs to restore and protect against future damage from storm at this historic landmark.

    Fort Travis, Texas

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    In 1898, along with federal development of the Port of Galveston, construction on the present Fort Travis was begun. The fort was completed in 1899 and heavily damaged during the 1900 storm. Repairs included the present 15 foot sea wall. During World War I Fort Travis garrisoned troops defending the Port of Galveston and its approaches. In 1942, the fort was enlarged and 2,500 troops were stationed there. When the war ended, Fort Travis was declared surplus property, dismantled, and in 1949 sold to private interests. The 60 acre park was acquired through a Moody Foundation grant in 1976 and is operated by the Galveston County Beach and Parks Department. Hurricane Ike in 2008 destroyed much of the promenade, sidewalks, and portions of the caretaker's house originally used to house Generals serving at Fort Travis. The collaborative effort of several FEMA components are displayed in this video as they begin repairs to restore and protect against future damage from storm at this historic landmark.
  • In response to housing needs created by Hurricane Ike, FEMA provided over 3,700 Temporary Housing Units which were placed either on the survivor's property, in a commercial mobile home park or in a FEMA constructed Community Site throughout Texas. As families find a more permanent solution to their living arrangements the temporary units are deactivated and removed. This video shows the steps of breaking down these units and the elements involved in originally securing these temporary homes when first brought on site.

    Temporary Housing Unit Deactivation

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    In response to housing needs created by Hurricane Ike, FEMA provided over 3,700 Temporary Housing Units which were placed either on the survivor's property, in a commercial mobile home park or in a FEMA constructed Community Site throughout Texas. As families find a more permanent solution to their living arrangements the temporary units are deactivated and removed. This video shows the steps of breaking down these units and the elements involved in originally securing these temporary homes when first brought on site.
  • Unused or hardly used furniture has been removed from returned damaged Temporary Housing Units at the FEMA Bon Wier Staging Site in Texas. This furniture, as well as some appliances, have been stored and used to replace any broken items in units currently housing survivors. At this stage of hurricane recovery, the stored furniture is no longer needed since temporary housing is coming to a close as Hurricane Ike survivors find more permanent dwellings. This excess furniture has been donated to non-profit agencies to disperse among needy applicants.

    Furniture Donation

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    Unused or hardly used furniture has been removed from returned damaged Temporary Housing Units at the FEMA Bon Wier Staging Site in Texas. This furniture, as well as some appliances, have been stored and used to replace any broken items in units currently housing survivors. At this stage of hurricane recovery, the stored furniture is no longer needed since temporary housing is coming to a close as Hurricane Ike survivors find more permanent dwellings. This excess furniture has been donated to non-profit agencies to disperse among needy applicants.
  • Temporary Housing Units were provided by FEMA to qualified survivors of Hurricane Ike in Texas for temporary use while they repair or rebuild their damaged homes, or find an alternative, more permanent dwelling. This video reveals the entire cycle of use these manufactured units experience from start to finish and is typical in each declared disaster where temporary housing is needed.

    Life Cycle of a THU

    Video by Robert Kaufmann
    Temporary Housing Units were provided by FEMA to qualified survivors of Hurricane Ike in Texas for temporary use while they repair or rebuild their damaged homes, or find an alternative, more permanent dwelling. This video reveals the entire cycle of use these manufactured units experience from start to finish and is typical in each declared disaster where temporary housing is needed.

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