Collection: 2011 Tornadoes/Alabama

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Images of Preparedness, Mitigation, Recovery
Collection Created:
September 19, 2013
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  • Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011— A bulldozer hoists concrete buckets to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it.  Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted to through Birmingham.  The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    The High Road to Recovery

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011— A bulldozer hoists concrete buckets to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it. Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted to through Birmingham. The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Photograph by Ruth Kennedy taken on 08/09/2011 in Alabama

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Photograph by Ruth Kennedy taken on 08/09/2011 in Alabama

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Rebuilding After Disaster

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Fultondale, Ala., August 9, 2011 -- Carpenters rebuilding the Black Creek Station community of Fultondale, Alabama, originally built less than a year before the Spring tornados damaged or destroyed more than a third of the subdivision. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Two rocking chairs mark the former entrance of a Pleasant Grove home,  where only three and a half months before more than a half dozen homes and countless trees filled the landscape. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornado, has nearly completed their debris cleaning process and is starting  to build again. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    AL_1971_Ruth Kennedy _Pleasant Grove_08/17/2011

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Two rocking chairs mark the former entrance of a Pleasant Grove home, where only three and a half months before more than a half dozen homes and countless trees filled the landscape. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornado, has nearly completed their debris cleaning process and is starting to build again. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Laborers cover roof trusses with plywood, rebuilding a roof from a home nearly destroyed in the April 27th tornado. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornados, represents a small portion of approximately 20,000 homes and businesses destroyed in the spring storms.  FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Photograph by Ruth Kennedy taken on 08/17/2011 in Alabama

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Laborers cover roof trusses with plywood, rebuilding a roof from a home nearly destroyed in the April 27th tornado. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornados, represents a small portion of approximately 20,000 homes and businesses destroyed in the spring storms. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Laborers lay concrete block, the foundation for a new home replacing the home completely destroyed in the April 27th tornado. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornados, has nearly completed their debris cleaning process, and some residents are already rebuilding. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    AL_1971_Pleasant Grove_Ruth Kennedy taken on 08/17/2011

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Laborers lay concrete block, the foundation for a new home replacing the home completely destroyed in the April 27th tornado. The Pleasant Grove community, heavily impacted by the April 27th tornados, has nearly completed their debris cleaning process, and some residents are already rebuilding. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Amist the scene of rebuilding after destruction, a figurine quoting a bible verse remains in a yard amongst minor debris in Pleasant Grove.  Since the April 27th storms, 10 million cubic yards of debris have been created, some articles have been reported traveling as far as 160miles. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    AL_1971_ Ruth Kennedy_08/17/2011_Pleasant Grove

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Pleasant Grove, Ala., August 17, 2011 -- Amist the scene of rebuilding after destruction, a figurine quoting a bible verse remains in a yard amongst minor debris in Pleasant Grove. Since the April 27th storms, 10 million cubic yards of debris have been created, some articles have been reported traveling as far as 160miles. FEMA is working with local officals to help get the community back on its feet. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Birmingham, Ala., August 23, 2011 --  James Crawford III, HPA Engineer, FEMA, discusses the safety features of theof the Safe Room model with  Craig Witherspoon, Superintendent, Birmingham City Schools. FEMA's Mitigation Program uses these rooms to accommodate structures from extreme weather threats, such as tornadoes.  FEMA donated the model to Huffman High School to use as a reference for better safe rooms all over the Birmingham City School District. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Saftey Education in Birmingham, the DAWG HAUS Model

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Birmingham, Ala., August 23, 2011 -- James Crawford III, HPA Engineer, FEMA, discusses the safety features of theof the Safe Room model with Craig Witherspoon, Superintendent, Birmingham City Schools. FEMA's Mitigation Program uses these rooms to accommodate structures from extreme weather threats, such as tornadoes. FEMA donated the model to Huffman High School to use as a reference for better safe rooms all over the Birmingham City School District. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011 -- Plainview High School resumed classes on Aug 15, facilitated in 37 classroom modular units and a portable restroom unit.  The high school was heavily impacted by 3 tornadoes on April 27, devastating nearly 28 miles of the town.  Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    A Temporary Solution for Plainview High School

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011 -- Plainview High School resumed classes on Aug 15, facilitated in 37 classroom modular units and a portable restroom unit. The high school was heavily impacted by 3 tornadoes on April 27, devastating nearly 28 miles of the town. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Rainsville , Ala., August 22, 2011 -- Bejan Taheri (recovery committee chair for Rainsville, AL) holds Travis Owens (a 4 ½-month-old Rainsville resident) during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville. Travis is one of the 5000 residents of Rainsville heavily affected by the 3 tornadoes which destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Looking Way Into the Future in Rainsville

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Rainsville , Ala., August 22, 2011 -- Bejan Taheri (recovery committee chair for Rainsville, AL) holds Travis Owens (a 4 ½-month-old Rainsville resident) during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville. Travis is one of the 5000 residents of Rainsville heavily affected by the 3 tornadoes which destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011 —Albie Lewis, Deputy FCO (Federal Coordinating Officer DR-1971-AL), shares a laugh with local residents during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville.  Three tornadoes destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Building the Future Together

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011 —Albie Lewis, Deputy FCO (Federal Coordinating Officer DR-1971-AL), shares a laugh with local residents during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville. Three tornadoes destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011— Throughout Rainsville, homes are quickly being rebuilt  and restored.  Aproximately 28 miles of Rainsville, including this home, was devastated by 3 tornadoes which struck the town on April 27.  Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA

    Rebuilding Across Rainsville

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011— Throughout Rainsville, homes are quickly being rebuilt and restored. Aproximately 28 miles of Rainsville, including this home, was devastated by 3 tornadoes which struck the town on April 27. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA
  • Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011— Officer Tim Devlin of the Rainsville Police Department discusses upcoming plans  with other Rainsville residents in a FEMA ESF#14 group exercise designed to help citizens express needs for rebuilding their town during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville.  Three tornadoes destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Rainsville Police Officer Discusses Town's Future

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Rainsville, Ala., August 22, 2011— Officer Tim Devlin of the Rainsville Police Department discusses upcoming plans with other Rainsville residents in a FEMA ESF#14 group exercise designed to help citizens express needs for rebuilding their town during a meeting at the Tom Bevill Enrichment Center in Rainsville. Three tornadoes destroyed a large portion of Rainsville on April 27th. Currently the FEMA ESF#14 team is working closely with Rainsville to rebuild the community to be better and stronger than before. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Tuscaloosa, Ala., August 19, 2011— Construction continues in the Forest Lake Community of Tuscaloosa, AL. On April 27, the Forest Lake area was destroyed by a tornado more than a mile wide. FEMA continues to work closely with Tuscaloosa to rebuild the community. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Rebuilding in Forest Lake

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Tuscaloosa, Ala., August 19, 2011— Construction continues in the Forest Lake Community of Tuscaloosa, AL. On April 27, the Forest Lake area was destroyed by a tornado more than a mile wide. FEMA continues to work closely with Tuscaloosa to rebuild the community. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011— Construction workers build the foundation to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it.  Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted to through Birmingham.  The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan.

    Going the Distance

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011— Construction workers build the foundation to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it. Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted to through Birmingham. The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan.
  • Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011—Welders straighten steel to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it.  Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted through to Birmingham.  The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan.

    Forging On

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Holt, Ala., August 19, 2011—Welders straighten steel to repair a section of Hurricane Creek Train Bridge, after an April 27th tornado ripped through the center of it. Hurricane Creek Bridge is the oldest and longest railroad bridge in the south east, built between 1909 and 1913. It is now owned by Alabama Southern Railroad, an 85 mile track running east from Columbus, MS to Birmingham, AL. Repair on the bridge began on May 25th and are expected to continue through November. Currently, trains are being rerouted through to Birmingham. The community of Holt is working closely with FEMA to create a long term recovery plan.
  • Holt, Ala., August 29, 2011—Holt citizens share what Holt means to them during a Long-Term Community Recovery meeting at Holt High school.  “Holt Forging Ahead” team works with the ESF 14 component of FEMA to unite the entire Holt community in an effort to rebuild, reshape, and revitalize after the April 27th tornado ravaged the town. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    What Holt Means

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Holt, Ala., August 29, 2011—Holt citizens share what Holt means to them during a Long-Term Community Recovery meeting at Holt High school. “Holt Forging Ahead” team works with the ESF 14 component of FEMA to unite the entire Holt community in an effort to rebuild, reshape, and revitalize after the April 27th tornado ravaged the town. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
  • Holt, Ala., August 29, 2011—Big sister Takishia Tillman, one of Holt's youngest residents quietly observe a Long-Term Community Recovery meeting at Holt High school.  “Holt Forging Ahead” team works with the ESF 14 component of FEMA to unite the entire Holt community an effort to rebuild, reshape, and revitalize after the April 27th tornado ravaged the town. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy

    Holt's Next Generation

    Photo by Ruth Kennedy
    Holt, Ala., August 29, 2011—Big sister Takishia Tillman, one of Holt's youngest residents quietly observe a Long-Term Community Recovery meeting at Holt High school. “Holt Forging Ahead” team works with the ESF 14 component of FEMA to unite the entire Holt community an effort to rebuild, reshape, and revitalize after the April 27th tornado ravaged the town. FEMA Photo/Ruth Kennedy
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