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  • Incremental Seismic Rehabilitation of Hotel and Motel Buildings

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    This manual provides owners of hotel and motel buildings with the information necessary to assess the seismic vulnerability of their buildings and to implement a program of incremental seismic rehabilitation for those buildings.
  • Installing Seismic Restraints for Electrical Equipment

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    This guide (available for download from www.viscma.com/publications.htm) provides equipment installers with information on how to attach electrical equipment to buildings to minimize earthquake damage. Many examples of attachments are presented, including anchors and seismic restraints. An electrical danger instruction chart and safety requirements and codes are included.
  • Installing Seismic Restraints for Duct and Pipe

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    This is one of three fully illustrated guides (available for download from www.viscma.com/publications.htm) that show equipment installers how to attach mechanical equipment (FEMA 412), electrical equipment (FEMA 413), and duct and pipe (FEMA 414) to buildings to minimize earthquake damage. The guides describe various types of equipment and include a chart that identifies the types of recommended equipment, the configuration for restraint, and the type of attachment needed. Step-by-step instructions and precautions for each type of equipment and methods for installing the equipment are included. Examples of anchoring and seismic restraint devices; attachment types and instructions for installing equipment in different configurations; and special cases for housekeeping pads, cable assemblies, supports for control panels, and residential equipment are included. The publication does not cover non-building structural framing required to elevate equipment above the floor.
  • Improvement of Nonlinear Static Seismic Analysis Procedures

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    This state-of-the-art resource captures the latest advances in nonlinear static analysis. It evaluates FEMA and Applied Technology Council (ATC) procedures for estimating the response of structures to ground shaking and attempts to address the significantly different results in estimates of maximum displacement that these procedures generate. This report sets the stage for future improvements to FEMA 356 or the ATC report, Seismic Evaluation and Retrofit of Concrete Buildings (ATC-40). The CD-ROM, FEMA 440CD, June 2005, contains the document (FEMA 440) and supplementary summaries in PDF files.
  • Seismic Considerations for Steel Storage Racks Located in Areas Accessible to the Public

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    This report highlights issues for consideration in the seismic design, installation, ongoing inspection, maintenance, and use of steel single selective pallet storage racks located in areas of retail warehouse stores and other facilities accessible to the general public. Included are a review of the performance of storage racks in past earthquakes; a history of the development of codes and standards used for storage rack design and current storage rack design practices; guidance on recommended performance goals and design requirements for storage racks; guidelines for implementation/responsibilities associated with the specification, procurement, and installation of pallet storage racks; suggested guidance for securing contents; recommendations for operations and use; suggested guidance for quality assurance programs; a discussion of current and past storage rack research and testing; suggestions for post-earthquake inspections; and proposed modifications to seismic design provisions and standards for racks.
  • Community-Based Pre-Disaster Mitigation: Curriculum for Emergency Managers and Community and Faith-Based Organizations

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    This curriculum was developed to empower communities to prevent damage from a range of hazards. Each section of the curriculum is designed to stand alone so that communities may use as much or as little of the curriculum as necessary.
  • Technical Manual for Dam Owners: Impacts of Animals on Earthen Dams

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    Safe dam operation includes comprehensive, state-ofpractice guidance on timely inspection and observation of wildlife damages, accurate wildlife identification and mitigation, and appropriate dam design, repair, and preventive measures.This technical manual provides guidance to dam specialists, including dam owners, operators, inspectors, state dam officials, and consulting engineers, in the following areas: (1) the impacts wildlife can have on earthen dams; (2) habitat, range, description, and behavior of common nuisance wildlife to aid in the proper identification at the dam; (3) state-of-practice methods to prevent and mitigate adverse wildlife impacts on earthen dams; and (4) state-of-practice design guidance for repair and preventive design associated with nuisance wildlife intrusion.
  • Preparing for Disaster for People with Disabilities and other Special Needs

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    For the millions of Americans who have physical, medical, sensory or cognitive disabilities, emergencies such as fires, floods and acts of terrorism present a real challenge. The same challenge also applies to the elderly and other special needs populations. This booklet will help people with disabilities prepare and emergency plan to protect themselves, family, friends, personal care assistant and others in the support network in the event of an emergency. Post the plan where everyone will see it, keep a copy with you and make sure everyone involved in your plan has a copy.
  • National Flood Insurance Program, Floodplain Management Requirements, A Study Guide and Desk Reference for Local Officials, Federal Emergency Management Agency

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    This publication can be used as a study guide to enhance the knowledge and skills of local officials responsible for administering and enforcing local floodplain management regulations. It is also intended to broaden their understanding of floodplain management strategies that can be applied at the local level. Local officials and others can also use the study guide to help them study for the exam for the Association of State Floodplain Manager's (ASFPM) Certified Floodplain Manager designation. Guidance is included on how to handle many of the issues and information provided that will help floodplain managers explain the requirements to citizens of your community.
  • FEMA 488, Mitigation Assessment Team Report: Hurricane Charley in Florida (2005)

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    This report summarizes the observations, conclusions, and recommendations of the Mitigation Assessment Team (MAT) deployed by FEMA on August 19, 2004, in response to Hurricane Charley. The team assessed damage across the width of the storm track, from its landfall near the communities on Sanibel and Captiva Islands to inland areas around Orlando. The MAT visited the following towns: Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda, Punta Gorda Isles, Sanibel Island, Captiva Island, North Captiva Island, Fort Myers Beach, Bokeelia/Pine Island, Cape Coral, Arcadia, Gardner, Zolfo Springs, Wauchula, Bowling Green, Fort Meade, Lake Wales, and Orlando.

    A Power Point presentation of the MAT report can be downloaded, in PDF format, by going to http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/27457.

  • FEMA 490, Mitigation Assessment Team Report: Summary Report on Building Performance 2004 Hurricane Season (2005)

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    The purpose of this document is to summarize the observations, conclusions, and recommendations that were obtained during post-disaster assessments sponsored by the FEMA Mitigation Division in response to Florida 2004 hurricane season. More than ten rapid response teams and two Mitigation Assessment Teams (MATs) were deployed to document observations and provide recommendations. The rapid response data collection teams focused on coastal high water marks, inland wind effects, residential and commercial building performance, critical and essential facility performance, and mitigation program effectiveness. The MATs assessed damage to the built environment and relied on the perishable data, such as high water marks, collected by the rapid response teams to quantify flood and wind effects of the hurricanes.
  • Adoption of Flood Insurance Rate Maps by Participating Communities

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    This document is now available at http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=3312
  • Repetitive Loss Property (RLP) Viewer 2.0

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    The Repetitive Loss Property (RLP) Viewer 2.0 is a standalone application capable of connecting to any standard National Tool (NT) database in Access format (.MDB) that uses GIS to display point features representing floodprone properties. The NT User's Guide, FEMA 497, provides assistance in using both tools. The National Flood Mitigation Data Collection Tool, FEMA 497 CD, was developed for Nationwide use to gather information about floodprone structures in order to evaluate appropriate long-term mitigation measures. To view and download FEMA 497 go to http://www.fema.gov/library/viewRecord.do?id=3413. An effort to upgrade FEMA computers to the Windows 7 OS will begin in August 2011. The FEMA standard image will not include Microsoft Access. If you use NT or RLP you can request to have MS Access installed to your FEMA PC by filling out the MS Access Request Form. For additional questions, please see the MS Access FAQs. A link to both the Access Request Form and the FAQs sheet can be found below.

  • Reducing Damage from Localized Flooding: A Guide for Communities

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    This guide is intended to help local offices in cities, towns, villages, and counties in the United States understand what they can do to reduce the damage, disruption, and public and private costs that result from the shallow, localized flooding that occurs within their jurisdictions. This is flooding that all too often escapes the attention received by larger floods or those that are clearly mapped and subject to floodplain development regulations.
  • Earthquake Safety Guide for Homeowners

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    This updated safety guide, which was originally developed and published by the California Seismic Safety Commission, provides homeowners with a good start to strengthening their homes against earthquake damage. The guide also illustrates the relative cost of prevention versus repair or replacement. (Available in multiple languages)
  • Before and After Disasters: Federal Funding for Cultural Institutions

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    This guide is an updated and expanded version of Resources for Recovery: Post-Disaster Aid for Cultural Institutions, first developed in 1992 by Heritage Preservation and then revised in 2000. Before and After Disasters includes summary descriptions and contact information for 15 Federal grant and loan programs ?most double the number of resources in the previous edition. It covers sources of Federal assistance for preparedness, mitigation, and response, as well as for recovery. Sample projects in disaster planning, training, treatment research, and restoration illustrate the funding guidelines.
  • Technical Manual for Dam Owners: Impacts of Plants on Earthen Dams

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    Tree and woody vegetation penetrations of earthen dams and their appurtenances have been demonstrated to be causes of serious structural deterioration and distress that can result in failure of earthen dams. Damage to earthen dams resulting from plant and animal penetrations is a significant dam safety issue in the United States. The purpose of this technical manual for Dam Owners, is to advance awareness of the characteristics and seriousness of dam safety problems associated with tree and woody vegetation growth impacts on earthen dams, provide a higher level of understanding of dam safety issues by reviewing current damage control policies, provide state-of-practice guidance for remediation design considerations associated with damages associated with tree and woody vegetation growth on earthen dams, and to provide rationale and state-of-practice techniques and procedures for management of desirable and undesirable vegetation on earthen dams.
  • The National Dam Safety Program Research Needs Workshop: Seepage through Embankment Dams

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    This workshop report documents expert consideration of (1) potential seepage problems and solutions associated with penetrations through embankment dams, e.g., outlet works conduits; (2) filter design criteria and observed performance; (3) inspection of dams for detection of seepage problems, failure modes associated with seepage and internal erosion, and analysis of risks associated with seepage and internal erosion; (4) investigation of seepage problems and concerns at dams, including the use of geophysical techniques, and instrumentation and measurements for evaluation of seepage performance; (5) remediation of seepage problems through cutoff, reduction of flow, and collection and control of seepage, including the use of geosynthetics; and (6) impacts of the aging of seepage control and collection system components on seepage performance.
  • The National Dam Safety Program Research Needs Workshop: Impacts of Plants and Animals on Earthen Dams

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    Several areas for future development related to the impacts of plants and animals on earthen dams are documented in this report, including (1) the development of tools to educate dam owners and engineers on how to spot problems caused by plant and animal penetrations, how to prevent these problems from occurring, and how to mitigate or repair existing problems; (2) the analysis of tools and methods for repairing animal burrows on dams; and (3) collaboration with other groups, such as federal wildlife agencies that have research programs in place.
  • The National Dam Safety Program Research Needs Workshop: Embankment Dam Failure Analysis

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    For this workshop, 35 national and international experts participated in discussions on research and new technology related to risk assessment, embankment dam failure, and flood routing. The experts identified 14 priority areas for research, including the updating, revision, and dissemination of the historic data set/database of dam failures; development of forensic guidelines and standards for dam safety expert use when reporting dam failures or dam incidents; creation of a forensic team that would be able to collect and disseminate valuable forensic data; identification of critical parameters for different types of failure modes; and basic physical research to model different dam parameters, such as soil properties and scaling effects, with the intent to verify the ability to model actual dam failure characteristics and extend dam failure knowledge using scale models.

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