Documents

Main ContentRSS Feed
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Wildfire

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Tornado

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Hurricane Wind

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Structural Earthquake

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Non-STructural Earthquake

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Data Documentation Template - Flood

    Go to Resource
    This is used to assist BC analysts in recording the data and methodologies utilized in their BCAs.
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis Checklist

    Go to Resource
    A guide for preparing a complete, well-documented grant application. The information that follows is grouped by category and meant to help Applicants and Sub-applicants submit a complete and technically supported BCA that can be properly reviewed
  • Integrating Manmade Hazards Into Mitigation Planning

    Go to Resource
    Although mitigation planning traditionally focused on planning for natural hazards, events such as the September 11, 2001, attacks, the July 2001 Baltimore hazardous material train derailment suggested that the time had come to incorporate terrorism and technological hazards into all aspects of emergency management planning, not just preparedness and response. Scores of smaller-scale incidents and accidents reinforced the need for communities to reduce their vulnerability to future terrorist acts and technological disasters. How-To Guide # 7 (FEMA 386-7) assumes that a community is engaged in the mitigation planning process and serves as a resource to help the community expand the scope of its plan to address terrorism and technological hazards. ** FEMA provides state and local governments with preparedness program funding in the form of Non-Disaster Grants to enhance the capacity of state and local emergency responders to prevent, respond to, and recover from a weapons of mass destruction terrorism incident involving chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive devices and cyber attacks. For more information, please see the Preparedness Grants Program page at http://www.fema.gov/preparedness-non-disaster-grants. To find funding opportunities with other Federal agencies, please visit the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance web site at https://www.cfda.gov/.
  • Flood Mitigation Assistance Program Guidance

    Go to Resource
    Provides an overview of the FMA program.
  • Flood Mitigation Assistance Brochure

    Go to Resource
    Provides an overview of the FMA program
  • Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) Brochure

    Go to Resource
    Overview of the FMA program
  • FY 2004 Flood Mitigation Assistance Program Guidance

    Go to Resource
    Provide guidance for implementing the FY04 FMA program.
  • FY 2005 Flood Mitigation Assistance Program Guidance

    Go to Resource

    Provides guidance on implementing the FY05 FMA program.

  • FY 2006 Flood Mitigation Assistance Program Guidance

    Go to Resource

    Provides guidance for implementing the FY06 FMA program.

  • Multi-Jurisdictional Mitigation Planning

    Go to Resource
    Mitigation Planning How-To Guide #8, (FEMA 386-8), the eighth guide in the State and Local Mitigation Planning How-To Series, provides suggestions to local governments for preparing multi-jurisdictional hazard mitigation plans. A multi-jurisdictional hazard mitigation plan is a plan prepared jointly by more than one jurisdiction and may include any county, municipality, city, town, township, school district or other special district, council of governments or other regional organization, Indian tribe or Alaska Native village, or unincorporated areas. Multi-jurisdictional plans pose special considerations that single-jurisdiction plans may not need to address; but there are benefits as well, such as cost savings to prepare plans, shared staff and resources, and comprehensive approaches to mitigation hazards that cross jurisdictional boundaries.
  • National Flood Insurance Program Summary of Coverage

    Go to Resource

    This document was prepared by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to help you understand your flood insurance policy. It provides general information about deductibles, what is and is not covered by flood insurance, and how items are valued at time of loss.

  • Hurricane Katrina Wind Water Line (WWL) Reports (Mississippi)

    Go to Resource
    Wind Water Line (WWL) Maps were developed for Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama to document the extent of flooding caused by storm surge that occurred as a result of Hurricane Katrina. WWL Maps provide an approximate boundary between areas that suffer from both wind and flood damage versus areas further inland where wind is the primary cause of damage.
  • Hurricane Katrina Wind Water Line (WWL) Reports (Louisiana)

    Go to Resource
    Wind Water Line (WWL) Maps were developed for Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama to document the extent of flooding caused by storm surge that occurred as a result of Hurricane Katrina. WWL Maps provide an approximate boundary between areas that suffer from both wind and flood damage versus areas further inland where wind is the primary cause of damage.
  • Hurricane Katrina Wind Water Line (WWL) Reports (Alabama)

    Go to Resource
    Wind Water Line (WWL) Maps were developed for Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama to document the extent of flooding caused by storm surge that occurred as a result of Hurricane Katrina. WWL Maps provide an approximate boundary between areas that suffer from both wind and flood damage versus areas further inland where wind is the primary cause of damage.
  • Integrating Historic Property and Cultural Resource Considerations into Hazard Mitigation Planning

    Go to Resource
    The importance of integrating historic property and cultural resource considerations into mitigation planning has been made all too apparent in disasters that have occurred in recent disasters, such as the Northridge Earthquake, the Midwest floods, and Hurricane Katrina. Whether a disaster impacts a major community museum, a historic "main street," or collections of family photographs, the sudden loss of historic properties and cultural resources can negatively impact a community's character and economy, and can affect the overall ability of the community to recover from a disaster. "How-To" Guide #6 (FEMA 386-6) shows communities, step by step with the needed tools and resources, how to develop and then implement a pre-disaster planning strategy for historic properties and cultural resources. While the emphasis is on the built environment, this Guide includes cultural institutions to address the mitigation of cultural heritage, including museum collections, works of art, and books and documents.

Pages

Back to Top