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  • Sample Local Mitigation Plan Scope of Work for Mitigation Grant Application

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    This document provides a sample scope of work for a mitigation planning sub-application for a local plan proposal.
  • Subgrant Applicant Quick Reference Guide to the Mitigation eGrants System

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    This guide assists subgrant applicants using the Mitigation eGrants Management System.
  • Grant Applicant Quick Reference Guide to Mitigation eGrants System

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    This is a guide to the Mitigation electronic grants (eGrants) management system for Grant Applicants.
  • Multi-Year Flood Hazard Identification Plan (MHIP) Flyer

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    This flyer provides an overview of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) Multi-Year Flood Hazard Identification Plan (MHIP). The MHIP details FEMA’s planned schedule and budget for providing updated digital flood hazard data and maps for communities nationwide as part of the ongoing Flood Map Modernization (Map Mod) effort. The release of the MHIP is a significant step forward for Map Mod. By planning flood hazard mapping projects over several years, FEMA provides a venue for tracking progress as flood hazard information is updated nationwide.
  • Flood Map Modernization: A Powerful Tool for Risk Management

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    This flyer provides an overview of the Flood Map Modernization (Map Mod) program. By providing updated maps and data, Map Mod equips communities with important data thereby enhancing local decision making ranging from insurance to construction to disaster planning exercises. Reliable flood data reflecting current conditions enables the end user to more accurately assess the level of flood risk within a community and to take appropriate measures to mitigate their physical and financial vulnerability to flooding. Communities with updated maps and data have the information required to develop a more comprehensive approach to disaster mitigation planning, economic development, and emergency response. Communities will be enabled to manage flood risks, water resources, land use, and other responsibilities more effectively.
  • Electronic Letters of Map Amendment (eLOMA)

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    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in association with the National Service Provider (NSP), designed a new interactive online determination tool for requests for Letters of Map Amendment (LOMAs) called eLOMA. eLOMA is a web-based application within the FEMA Mapping Information Platform that provides Licensed Professionals (i.e., licensed land surveyors and professional engineers) with a system to submit simple LOMA requests to FEMA. This tool is designed to make determinations based on the information submitted by the Licensed Professionals and allow them to generate a determination from FEMA in minutes. These documents are current as of November 2010.

  • Digital Flood Maps: From Q3 Flood Data to DFIRMs

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    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has produced two flood map products using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology in support of the National Flood Insurance Program. The first digital product FEMA created is called Q3 Flood Data. As technology advanced, FEMA then created Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps (DFIRMs). As part of Flood Map Modernization, FEMA will only update or produce DFIRMs. This flyer explains the change and transition from using Q3 flood data to the production and use of DFIRMs.
  • Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program Flyer

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    This flyer covers the objectives and benefits of the Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program, explains available funding, and provides links to more information on the program.

  • Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program

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    This flyer covers the objectives and benefits of the Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program. Additionally, it explains available funding for a CTP, and provides links to more information on the program.
  • FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) Flyer

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    This flyer summarizes the topics, products, and tools supported by the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) contact center, as well as provides pertinent FMIX contact information.  

  • FEMA 388 CD, Safe Room and Community Shelter Resource CD (2009)

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    On this CD, you will find displays, posters, handouts, multimedia, and other resources that provide information about mitigating for tornadoes or other high-wind events and about the importance of safe rooms and community shelter construction in saving lives during such events. Included on this CD are: safe room display panels which contain artwork for reproducing the exhibit panels used in the National Emergency Training Center Safe Room Exhibit, maps on tornado activity in the United States, posters, booth display panels, FEMA's Taking Shelter from the Storm brochure, various handouts, and a safe room PowerPoint presentation. To view what is on each of 2 CDs in this resource you can view the pdf files supplied below.
  • An Action Plan for Reducing Earthquake Hazards of Existing Buildings

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    Buildings in the United States have been constructed in a variety of environments. Many located in areas of seismic risk are not earthquake resistant. Thus, even moderate earthquakes threaten to result in substantial life loss and injury. The purpose of this action plan therefore, is to reduce the potential for loss of life and life threatening injuries in earthquakes. To achieve this goal, the action plan identifies recommended strategies, techniques, research needs, and resources required to initiate and sustain hazard abatement programs for existing seismically hazardous nonfederal buildings nationwide. The action plan recommends a variety of initiatives and activities and involves two main thrusts: the need for research on a variety of subjects, and the need to accelerate the application of current knowledge, practice and techniques.
  • FEMA 199, Financial Incentives for Seismic Rehabilitation of Hazardous Buildings – An Agenda for Action. Volume 2: State and Local Case Studies and Recommendations

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    The Financial Incentives series publications (Volumes 1-3, FEMA 198, FEMA 199, and FEMA 216) identify and describe the existing and potential regulatory and financial mechanisms and incentives for lessening the risks posed by existing buildings in an earthquake. Volume 2 includes detailed descriptions of the 20 case studies that were examined as part of the project.
  • Performance Analysis of Mitigation Projects in Louisiana (2002)

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    In a sense, Louisiana is the floodplain of the nation. Louisiana waterways drain two thirds of the continental United States. Precipitation in New York, the Dakotas, even Idaho and the Province of Alberta, finds its way to Louisiana’s coastline. Pre-existing high land is often the result of natural levees developing along the banks of historical or present-day waterways. Despite massive improvements to reduce the impacts of severe weather in the last 100 years, flooding is a constant threat. The State of Louisiana has more flood insurance claims than any other state in the country. Leading the nation, Louisiana has more than 18,000 repetitively flooded structures. Repetitive loss structures are the largest drain on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).
  • Missouri Buyout Program

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    Of the nine states affected by flooding during the spring and summer of 1993, Missouri was the hardest hit, with damages totaling $3 billion. The Missouri floods of 1993 ruined more cropland, destroyed more residences and businesses, and cost taxpayers more money than any other flood in the state’s long history of flooding. For the thousands of Missourians who lost their homes, businesses, and everything they cherished, the floods were a living nightmare. But thankfully for many, it has not been a recurring nightmare. Since 1993, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Missouri State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) have partnered with local governments to help thousands of willing homeowners move out of the floodplain. The people profiled in this report are just a few of the countless success stories from the Missouri Buyout Program. Devastated by the floods of 1993 and 1995, these people and communities took seriously the opportunity to move out of harm’s way.
  • Innovative Floodplain Management, Kinston, North Carolina

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    Successful floodplain management depends on a combination of detailed documentation, mitigation planning, community education, and project marketing. The City of Kinston-Lenoir County, North Carolina, used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to integrate these elements into a model floodplain management program. The results are very impressive.

  • The 1993 Great Midwest Flood: Voices 10 Years Later

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    The 1993 Great Midwest Flood: Voices 10 Years Later is a collection of success stories taken largely from existing sources. These success stories document what effective mitigation can do to prevent future flood disasters. This publication also includes narratives from several "veterans" of the Great Midwest Flood of 1993 who had National Flood Insurance Program coverage and subsequently urged other property owners to buy it too. The Great Midwest Flood of 1993 was a landmark event that spanned more than four months. Remembering its devastation 10 years later may help other property owners and communities at risk from flooding become more aware of the harm that floods can do to lives, property, and infrastructure. This 10th-anniversary anthology will also be a source of inspiration and encouragement for those communities and property owners at risk from flooding that there are measures they can take--today--to reduce their physical and financial risk from flood hazards.

  • Residential Safe Rooms: Background and Research (2003)

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    A residential safe room is a small, specially designed (“hardened”) room, such as a bathroom or closet, or other space within the house that is intended to provide a place of refuge only for the people who live in the house. In areas subject to extreme-wind events, homeowners should consider building a residential safe room. Wind hazards, such as those associated with tornadoes and hurricanes, vary throughout the United States. The decision to build a safe room will be based largely on the magnitude of the wind hazard in a given area and on the level of risk considered acceptable.

  • Residential Safe Rooms: Background and Research (2003)

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    A residential safe room is a small, specially designed (“hardened”) room, such as a bathroom or closet, or other space within the house that is intended to provide a place of refuge only for the people who live in the house. In areas subject to extreme-wind events, homeowners should consider building a residential safe room. Wind hazards, such as those associated with tornadoes and hurricanes, vary throughout the United States. The decision to build a safe room will be based largely on the magnitude of the wind hazard in a given area and on the level of risk considered acceptable.

  • Safe Rooms Save Lives: State of Oklahoma Safe Room Initiative (2003)

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    On May 3, 1999, more than 70 tornadoes tore through Kansas and Oklahoma in the worst tornado outbreak in a generation. As a result of these tornadoes, in Oklahoma alone over 44 persons died and almost 800 were injured. How could Oklahomans feel safe in future tornadoes? To help answer this question, the State of Oklahoma launched an initiative to promote and support the construction of storm shelters in homes. These shelters, built to FEMA guidelines, are called “safe rooms.” The initiative was the first large-scale effort to build thousands of safe rooms through a rebate program, and its success is a direct result of the involvement and strong support of the Governor of Oklahoma and the participation of partners in industry, business, government, and the private sector. Thousands of safe rooms were built and, although funding for the rebate program has ended, the initiative continues to result in the construction of safe rooms throughout the state.

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