Documents

Main ContentRSS Feed
  • Document Control Procedures Manual

    Go to Resource

    The FEMA Document Control Procedures Manual is to be used in conjunction with the guidelines and standards. The Manual provides guidance to FEMA, mapping partner and contractor staff for:

    • Processing of standard and non-standard documents used in FEMA-contracted studies/restudies.
    • Community-initiated map revisions.
    • Conditional and final map revisions based on conditions other than fill.
    • Conditional and final map revisions based on fill.
    • Conditional and final map amendments.
    • Letter of determination review and special conversions.

    The Manual also provides procedures and sample documents for use in tracking community compliance and documenting a community's entry into NFIP.

  • Phase 1 Summary Report for Coastal Flood Hazard Analysis and Mapping for the Pacific Coast of the United States

    Go to Resource
    This report documents the results of a project to evaluate existing FEMA procedures for delineating coastal flood hazard areas in three major coastal regions of the United States—the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific—and to develop new guidelines and procedures for the Pacific region.The goal of this project is to incorporate recent advances in the sciences and in coastal engineering into a recommended approach for improved coastal flood hazard mapping, based on an understanding of local and regional coastal processes.
  • The Flood Map Modernization Mid-Course Adjustment

    Go to Resource
    The Flood Map Modernization Mid-Course Adjustment outlines in detail the purpose of the National Flood Insurance Program, status of the Flood Map Modernization initiative, benefits of Flood Map Modernization and the Mid-Course Adjustment.
  • "Mapping of Areas Protected by Levee Systems," Section 65.10 of the National Flood Insurance Program Regulations

    Go to Resource
    This section of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) regulations (44 CFR 65.10), dated October 1, 2006, applies to the evaluation and mapping of levee systems and levee-impacted areas. These regulations were originally published in August 1986.
  • Provisionally Accredited Levees Mapping Scenarios

    Go to Resource

    This Fact Sheet, dated October 2012, provides information regarding National Flood Insurance Program practices for the evaluation and mapping of levee systems and levee-impacted areas, with emphasis on Procedure Memorandum Nos. 34 and 43 and on the mapping scenarios to be considered in determining whether the Provisionally Accredited Levee designation applies to a particular levee system. This Fact Sheet was designed for a more technical audience.

  • Partnership Agreement Template for Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program

    Go to Resource
    The Partnership Agreement is a broad statement of principle, emphasizing the value of the National Flood Insurance Program's three components of insurance, floodplain management, and mapping. The Partnership Agreement recognizes the fundamental importance of flood hazard identification in the successful reduction of future flood losses and the Partner's commitment to the effort.
  • Mapping Activity Statement (MAS) and Statement of Work (SOW) Templates for the Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program

    Go to Resource

    FEMA and its CTPs administer activities of the CTP Program through close and frequent coordination. There are three formal agreements involved: the Partnership Agreement, a Mapping Activity Statement (MAS) or Statement of Work (SOW), and a Cooperative Agreement. The Partnership Agreement is a prerequisite to any further activities under the CTP Program. CTP Program projects are collaborative efforts where both the CTP and FEMA contribute data, units of work and/or funding to maximize the extent, accuracy, and utility of flood risk project to best meet programmatic needs, while minimizing costs for all parties. The MAS or SOW supplements the Partnership Agreement and is a key component of a Cooperative Agreement award package. The MAS or SOW identifies the activities that will be accomplished for a particular project or funding year, defines the roles and responsibilities of all parties involved, and documents the funding and data contributions of both FEMA and the Partner(s). The MAS and SOW templates are typically revised each fiscal year to align with updated Program priorities, standards, and processes.

  • Cooperating Technical Partners (CTP) Program Guidance

    Go to Resource
    The purpose of the guidance in this document is to assist FEMA and CTP partners in preparing, developing, and managing CTP activities. This document addresses administration, funded activities, eligibility and evaluation criteria, reporting requirements, technical capabilities, contracting requirements, standards, certification, funding, and cooperative agreement management for the CTP Program. This guidance document is updated each year for the following fiscal year.
  • Plaster Creek Flood Mitigation Project in Grand Rapids, Michigan (April 2006)

    Go to Resource
    Following severe storms and flooding in September 2000, the City of Grand Rapids in Kent County, Michigan, applied to FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program for funds to implement measures designed to protect residential structures from floodwaters. The measures include the heightening of an existing earthen levee, construction of a steel sheet pile floodwall, construction of a series of low earthen levees and modular block floodwalls, and the clearing of an existing diversion canal to improve its conveyance capacity. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared an Environmental Assessment to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions.
  • Pigeon Creek Flood Mitigation Project, Village of Thiensville, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin (March 2006)

    Go to Resource
    The Village Thiensville in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, applied to FEMA’s Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program for funds to improve water conveyance along Pigeon Creek and create additional water storage, to protect surrounding homes and businesses from flooding, and to relieve sanitary sewer backup. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared an Environmental Assessment to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project.
  • City of Titusville Flood Protection Project, Crawford County, Pennsylvania (March 2006)

    Go to Resource
    The City of Titusville, Pennsylvania, applied to FEMA for Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding following flooding that occurred in July 2003. The City proposes to construct a detention dam upstream of the city to reduce flood damages in the Church Run Watershed. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared an Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action.
  • HAZUS: Battling Hazards with a Brand New Tool

    Go to Resource
    Which buildings, roads, and bridges may be damaged and how great would the damage be? Which roads may be shut down? Which areas may be affected if utilities go down? Which businesses will close? Without answers to these questions, communities are hampered in their efforts to plan responsibly for future development, safe and effective evacuation routes, and appropriate emergency shelter locations-and to take steps that will make their communities safer places to live and work. This article answers complex questions about how HAZUS-MH can help communities in planning and preparing for, responding to, and recovering from hazard events.
  • HAZUS-MH Resources One-Pager

    Go to Resource
    This one-pager provides resources available for HAZUS-MH, including useful web links, publications, CDs, how-to guides, and PowerPoint presentations.
  • Flood Map Modernization Mapping the Risk (2005)

    Go to Resource
    Editorial board meeting discussing the need to update the flood maps in Hillsborough County and on the best and most accurate way to update these maps. New flood hazard maps mean a safer Hillsborough County. Current flood risk data allows for more informed decisions. County’s proactive outreach means the public will know where to go for more information and what their options are. The towns’ people enrolled community partners in a collaborative approach to educate the public.
  • Matuu Stream Flood Management Project, American Samoa (June 2006)

    Go to Resource
    The American Samoa Department of Public Works (ASDPW) applied for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds in response to Cyclone Heta, which occurred in January 2004. ASDPW identified the need to reduce the flood hazard caused by the encroachment of Afuelo Stream towards structures in the village of Matuu and the degradation around the culverts that carry the stream through the village. Reducing these flood hazards would help protect villagers and their property from flooding. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared an Environmental Assessment to evaluate the impacts of the proposed HMGP project.
  • Big Tujunga Dam Seismic Rehabilitation, Los Angeles County, California (March 2006)

    Go to Resource
    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, FEMA has prepared a Final Environmental Assessment for the Big Tujunga Dam Seismic Rehabilitation to evaluate the impacts of the proposed action on the environment. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Works (LADPW) applied for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding to improve the dam and related facilities as part of the recovery from the Northridge earthquake of 1994. LADPW has identified the need to seismically strengthen the dam to remove the threat of failure during a significant seismic event. To address this hazard, LADPW proposes to reinforce the dam; modify the spillway, dam crest, and appurtenant structures; and put in place a new dam control system.
  • Conejo Recreation and Park District Fire Mitigation Project, Ventura County, California (March 2006)

    Go to Resource
    In response to the southern California wildfires of October 2003, the Conejo Recreation and Park District has applied for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds to conduct vegetation management on public property managed by the Conejo Open Space Conservation Agency in the City of Thousand Oaks, Ventura County, California. The Simi Fire burned 108,204 acres, destroyed 37 homes, and caused 21 injuries. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared this Supplemental Environmental Assessment to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed HMGP project.
  • Urban Fuel Load Reduction Project, City of Portland, Oregon (February 2006)

    Go to Resource
    In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared a draft Environmental Assessment to analyze potential environmental impacts of the City of Portland’s proposed project to utilize and build upon an existing volunteer program to include fuels reduction education and vegetation management for wildfire risk reduction to mitigate fire hazard at the wildland-urban interface where there are open spaces, highly flammable vegetation, and dead trees near homes and businesses.
  • Reconstruction of the Sauk River Road, Snohomish County, Washington (August 2006)

    Go to Resource
    To comply with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA prepared an Environmental Assessment to evaluate the potential impacts of a proposed Public Assistance project to provide continual public vehicle access to Sauk Prairie Road in Snohomish County, Washington. Record rainfall occurred in Washington State during October 15-23, 2003 that led to extensive flooding throughout the region. Flooding along the Sauk River caused erosion of the North Sauk River Road east of the town of Darrington.
  • Charlotte County Fire Station #7, Punta Gorda, Charlotte County, Florida (December 2006)

    Go to Resource
    In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and its implementing regulations, FEMA has prepared an Environmental Assessment to analyze potential environmental impacts associated with a proposed project to build a new Fire Station #7 through FEMA’s Public Assistance Program. Hurricane Charley (2004) severely damaged infrastructure in the City of Punta Gorda, Charlotte County, Florida, including Fire Station #7. The City proposes to build a new fire station, which will allow for delivery of emergency and life-saving fire/rescue services for the City of Punta Gorda and the Charlotte County community and provide safe work and housing space for fire/rescue staff.

Pages

Back to Top