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Sharing Technology & Expertise to Strengthen the Team

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Today, the U.S. and Canada signed a partnership agreement to adapt FEMA’s hazard assessment software technology for use in Canada and elsewhere outside the United States. Hazus or “Hazards U.S.” is a risk assessment software tool for emergency management professionals that combines science, engineering, and geospatial information technology to estimate potential loss of life and property damage from disasters and natural hazards.

The agreement follows increased cooperative efforts between representatives of FEMA and Natural Resources Canada to better assess common natural hazards of the two nations, such as the impact of any potential activity along the Cascadia subduction zone, the cross-border fault line that runs through the territory of both Canada and the Northwestern U.S.* The agreement, signed on behalf of Canada by Dr. Miroslav Nastev, Quantitative Risk Assessment Project Manager for Geological Survey of Canada, allows for FEMA’s Hazus modeling technology to project the potential impact of activity along the Canadian side of the Cascadia Fault line.

This is a great step forward as we continue to work with our international partners to ensure that we’re making strides to protect lives and property before, during and after disaster strikes. We often talk about the team approach here at FEMA and what better way to demonstrate it in an international context.

For more information about Hazus, visit: fema.gov/hazus.

A photo from the fifth annual Hazus Conference held this past week in Seattle, Wash., where we signed the agreement. The conference hosted hundreds of emergency managers, geologists, Geographic Information System (GIS) specialists and federal, state and local emergency management personnel from around the world, where they discussed assessing disaster risk and modeling using advanced tools such as HAZUS.
CAPTION: A photo from the fifth annual Hazus Conference held this past week in Seattle, Wash., where we signed the agreement. The conference hosted hundreds of emergency managers, geologists, Geographic Information System (GIS) specialists and federal, state and local emergency management personnel from around the world, where they discussed assessing disaster risk and modeling using advanced tools such as HAZUS.

* The agreement as a result of a joint agreement on Cooperation in Science and Technology for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Border Security, which is administered by both the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Centre for Security Science of Defence Research and Development Canada.

Fecha de la última actualización: 
22/02/2013 - 16:48
Posted on Lun, 15/08/2011 - 08:03
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