FEMA E-74 Appendix D. Mechanical, Electrical, & Plumbing Components Checklist

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Appendix D. Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Components Checklist

Item No./
Subcategory
Example No.Component Name(s)Principal ConcernsCNCNAChecklist Questions
(Yes=Compliance; No or Unknown=Noncompliance; NA=Not Applicable)
6.4.1 Mechanical Equipment6.4.1.1Boilers, Furnaces, Pumps and Chillers (HVAC wet-side equipment)Sliding, overturning, broken gas/fuel or exhaust lines, leaking fluids, loss of function   Are the boilers, pumps, chillers and similar wet-side HVAC equipment securely anchored to the floor or wall with adequately sized bolts?
   Do HVAC wet-side equipment items that are mounted on vibration isolators have adequate lateral restraint provided by snubbers, bumpers, or restrained vibration isolators?
   Are housekeeping pads under boilers and similar equipment anchored to the floor slab?
   Does the gas line have a flexible connection to the water heater or boiler that is able to accommodate movement?
   Are furnaces, and furnace or boiler bases, constructed without using unreinforced masonry?
6.4.1.2General Manufacturing and Process MachineryFalling hazards, hazardous material leaks or spills, loss of function   Is manufacturing and process machinery and related equipment, cranes, tanks, piping, chutes, and conveyors all adequately restrained and anchored, particularly items that may fall and injure workers, result in hazardous materials release, or create hazardous electrical conditions?
   Have all life safety hazards been addressed by bracing or anchoring clear falling hazards and other hazardous items?
   If immediate occupancy or operations is a project objective, has a design professional familiar with nonstructural anchorage of manufacturing and process machinery been engaged to perform a detailed survey of the plant?
6.4.1.3HVAC Equipment With Vibration IsolationFall off isolators, overturning, broken gas/fuel or exhaust lines, leaking fluids, loss of function   Do HVAC dry-side equipment items such as air compressors, fans, blowers and filters that are mounted on vibration isolators have adequate lateral restraint provided by snubbers, bumpers, or restrained vibration isolators?
   If large equipment is mounted on a concrete housekeeping pad, is the pad adequately anchored into the structural slab?
   Do roof-mounted HVAC units that are mounted on vibration isolators have adequate lateral restraint provided by snubbers, bumpers, or restrained vibration isolators?
   For roof-mounted units, are the curbs supporting the vibration isolators securely attached to the structural roof framing?
6.4.1.4HVAC Equipment Without Vibration IsolationSliding, overturning, broken gas/fuel or exhaust lines, leaking fluids, loss of function   Is equipment (e.g. gas-fired boiler, commercial water heater, chiller, etc.) securely mounted to the floor, wall, or roof with adequately sized bolts?
   If large equipment is mounted on a concrete housekeeping pad, is the pad adequately anchored into the structural slab?
   Does the gas or fuel line have a flexible connection that is able to accommodate movement?
   For roof-mounted units, are the curbs supporting the vibration isolators securely attached to the structural roof framing?
   Are wall- or window-mounted window air conditioning units securely mounted to the wall or shelf?
6.4.1.5HVAC Equipment Suspended In-line With DuctworkFalling or swinging hazard, separate from ductwork, loss of function   Is suspended equipment braced or anchored independently from the ductwork?
   Does the equipment have flexible connections to gas, fuel, or electrical lines?
6.4.1.6Suspended EquipmentGas leak, falling hazard   Are the suspended room heaters, especially gas-fired ones, laterally supported
   Are gas-fired heaters fitted with flexible gas connections?
6.4.2 Storage Tanks and Water Heaters6.4.2.1Structurally Supported Tanks and VesselsTank or vessel rupture, pipe break   Is the tank securely attached to the supports?
   Are the tank supports braced in both directions?
   Are the tank supports attached with anchor bolts to concrete walls or foundation pad?
   Is the foundation large enough to keep the tank from sliding or tipping over?
   Is the wall strong enough to support the tank?
6.4.2.2Flat Bottom Tanks and VesselsTank or vessel rupture, pipe break   Is the tank securely anchored to a concrete slab or foundation?
   Is the foundation large enough to keep the tank from sliding or tipping over?
6.4.2.3Compressed Gas CylindersGas leak   Are all gas cylinders tightly secured with a chain near the top and bottom or otherwise restrained from movement in each direction?
   Are the chains or restraints securely anchored to a wall or counter with screws or bolts rather than clamps?
   If the gas cylinders are attached to piping, are the restraints adequate to prevent damage at the piping connections?
6.4.2.4Water HeatersGas leak, water leak, loss of function   Are the water heaters securely anchored to the floor or wall?
   Do the gas lines or electrical conduit and water lines have flexible connections to the water heater that are able to accommodate movement?
   Does the water heater meet the limitations for use of prescriptive restraints? Is the capacity less than 100 gallons and is there a structural wall within 12 inches?
   Does the wall have adequate strength to restrain the water heater?
6.4.3 Pressure Piping6.4.3.1Suspended Pressure PipingBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are the pipes laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
   Are the pipes free of asbestos insulation that could be damaged by movement in an earthquake?
   Are the pipes free of asbestos that would need to be abated before any retrofit work?
6.4.3.2In-line Valves and PumpsLoss of function, leaks   Are the distribution pumps anchored, or are they mounted on vibration isolation springs with additional seismic lateral restraints?
   Are suspended valves and pumps adequately braced and anchored to structural elements?
6.4.3.3Flexible Connections, Expansion Joints, Seismic SeparationsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are flexible connections provided where piping connects to rigidly mounted equipment?
   Are flexible connections provided where pipes cross expansion joints or seismic separations between buildings?
   Are pipe penetrations through structural walls or framing members large enough to allow for some seismic movement?
6.4.3.4Pipe RisersBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are risers (vertical runs of piping) laterally restrained at each floor level or roughly at 20 foot intervals?
6.4.3.5Floor-Mounted Pipe SupportsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are the pipes laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
6.4.3.6Roof-Mounted Pipe SupportsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are the pipes laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction and do the restraints appear adequate for the roof level? [Accelerations at the roof level are typically higher than at lower levels of a building.]
   Are the curbs and restraints securely attached to the structure and protected from weathering and corrosion?
6.4.3.7Wall-Mounted Pipe SupportsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are the pipes laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
6.4.3.8Pipe PenetrationsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Are pipe penetrations through structural walls or framing members large enough to allow for some seismic movement or are the pipes restrained to prevent impact with the structural element?
6.4.4 Fire Protection Piping6.4.4.1Suspended Fire Protection PipingDamage to sprinkler heads, leaks, loss of function   Are the fire sprinkler piping components laterally restrained in each direction?
   Is the ceiling restrained so the ceilings won't break the sprinkler heads?
6.4.4.2In-line Valves and Pumps    Is the fire water pump anchored, or is it mounted on vibration isolators that have additional seismic restraint?
6.4.4.3Flexible Connections, Expansion Joints, Seismic SeparationsBreaks, leaks   Are flexible connections provided where piping connects to rigidly mounted equipment?
   Are flexible connections provided where pipes cross expansion joints or seismic separations between buildings?
   Are pipe penetrations through structural walls or framing members large enough to allow for some seismic movement?
6.4.4.4Pipe RisersBreaks, leaks   Are risers (vertical runs of piping) laterally restrained at each floor level?
6.4.4.5Pipes Supported from FloorBreaks, leaks   Are the pipes laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
6.4.5 Fluid Piping, Not Fire Protection6.4.5.1Hazardous MaterialsBreaks, leaks, hazardous materials release   Is the hazardous material piping laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
   Where required, does the hazardous material piping have double walls, secondary containment, leak detection systems or monitoring and are these systems designed for seismic loading?
   Do the pipes have flexible connections that are able to accommodate relative movement at locations where they are attached to rigidly mounted equipment or where they cross seismic separations?
   Does piping containing fuel or other hazardous materials have a seismic shut-off valve or excess flow valve?
   If the shut-off for the line is manual, is a wrench stored within easy reach?
6.4.5.2Nonhazardous MaterialsBreaks, leaks, loss of function   Is the piping laterally restrained at reasonable intervals in each direction?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
   Are the restraints securely attached to the structure?
Do the pipes have flexible connections that are able to accommodate relative movement at locations where they are attached to rigidly mounted equipment or where they cross seismic separations?
6.4.6 Ductwork6.4.6.1Suspended DuctworkCollapse, separation, leaking, fumes   Are the rectangular distribution ducts larger than 6 sq ft in cross sectional area laterally supported in each direction?
   Are circular ducts larger than 28 inches diameter laterally supported in each direction?
   Are the supports and hangers securely attached to the structure?
   Are the distribution ducts able to accommodate movement at locations where they cross separations between buildings?
6.4.6.2Air DiffusersDrop out of ceiling grid   Are the air distribution grills or diffusers anchored to adequately supported sheet-metal ducts or to the ceiling grid or wall?
   Do the diffusers have positive restraint, independent of the ceiling grid, such as at least two vertical hanger wires per diffuser?
6.4.7 Electrical and Communications Equipment

Caution: Only qualified personnel should open access panels on electrical equipment.
6.4.7.1Control Panels, Motor Control Centers, Switchgear, etc.Sliding or overturning, broken or damaged conduit or electrical bus   Are the control panels, motor control centers, switchgear and similar items all properly anchored to the floor or laterally supported by a structural wall?
   Do the walls used to support these electrical cabinets have adequate strength to restrain these items?
6.4.7.2Emergency GeneratorFailed vibration isolation mounts; broken fuel, signal, power and exhaust lines; loss of function   Is the emergency generator adequately secured, especially if mounted on motor vibration isolation springs?
   Is the concrete housekeeping pad adequately anchored to the structural slab?
   Is the diesel fuel tank adequately braced and anchored? (Refer to additional questions for structurally supported tanks and vessels).
   Are the fuel lines, cooling water lines, and exhaust flues for the emergency generator attached with flexible connections that are able to accommodate relative movement at junctions to spring-mounted equipment, at building entry and exit points, and at expansion joints within the building?
   Have all the components of the emergency power generating system and the electrical distribution system been checked as part of this survey?
6.4.7.3TransformersSliding, oil leakage, bushing failure, loss of function   Are transformers properly anchored to the floor or wall?
6.4.7.4Batteries and Battery RacksBatteries fall, rack tips; loss of emergency power   Are the batteries securely attached to the battery rack?
   Is the battery rack cross-braced in both directions?
   Does the battery rack have anchor bolts secured to a concrete foundation pad?
   Is the foundation large enough to keep the battery rack from sliding or tipping?
6.4.7.5Photovoltaic Power SystemsFalling hazard for roof mounted   Are the solar panels securely anchored to the roof?
   Is the piping laterally restrained?
6.4.7.6Communications EquipmentSliding, overturning, or toppling leading to loss of function   Is the microwave communications equipment (antennae, receiver, transmitter, etc.) securely supported and/or anchored?
   Are the components of the public address system and phone system secured?
6.4.8 Electrical and Communications Distribution Equipment6.4.8.1Electrical Raceways, Conduit, and Cable TraysElectrical hazards, loss of function   Are the raceways, bus ducts, and cable trays all laterally braced, including both transverse and longitudinal braces at reasonable spacing?
   Are electrical cables or conduit able to distort at the connections with the equipment or where they cross seismic joints between buildings?
6.4.8.2Electrical Distribution PanelsElectrical hazards, loss of function   Are the electrical distribution panels securely anchored to the floor or wall?
6.4.9 Light Fixtures6.4.9.1RecessedFalling hazards   Are recessed lights securely attached to the ceiling grid to resist seismic shaking and is the ceiling grid adequately braced?
   Do the lay-in fluorescent light fixtures have positive support, independent of the ceiling grid, such as at least two diagonally opposite hanger wires per light fixture?
   Do lay-in fixtures weighing more than 50 pounds have independent lateral support?
   Are lens covers attached or supplied with safety devices?
6.4.9.2Surface-mountedFalling hazard   Are spot lights or track lights securely attached to resist seismic shaking?
   Are exterior light fixtures properly supported or securely attached to the structure?
   Are emergency lights and exit lights mounted to protect them from falling off the wall or off shelf supports?
6.4.9.3Pendant Light FixturesFalling hazard, light fixture or unrestrained bulbs   Do chandeliers or other hanging fixtures have safety cables to prevent them from impacting each other or a window?
   Are lens covers attached or supplied with safety devices?
   Do pendant or stem light fixtures have safety cables so they will not fall if the fixture sways and breaks the stem connection, or are they braced to prevent swaying?
6.4.9.4Heavy Light FixturesFalling hazard   Are heavy light fixtures, such as operating room lights, adequately braced and anchored to the structure independent of the ceiling system?
6.4.10 Elevators and escalators

Caution: The moving parts or components of these systems need to be evaluated by qualified personnel. Inappropriate seismic restraints may compromise the safe operation of these systems.
6.4.10.1Hydraulic ElevatorLoss of function   Are the components of the hydraulic system properly anchored?
6.4.10.2Traction ElevatorLoss of function, counter-weights out of guide rails, cables out of sheaves, dislodged equipment   Are the cables installed in such a way that they are protected against misalignment during an earthquake?
   Is the elevator cab properly attached to the guide rails?
   Are the counterweights properly attached to the guide rails?
   Are the guide rails securely attached to the building?
   Are the motor and motor control cabinets properly anchored?
   Is the elevator equipped with a seismic switch?
6.4.10.3EscalatorsLoss of function   Is the escalator control equipment securely anchored?
   Is it known if the escalator was designed by an engineer to accommodate relative movement between floors during an earthquake?
   Is the control equipment for the moving walkway properly anchored?
6.4.11 Conveyors, material handling6.4.11.1ConveyorsLoss of function, falling hazard if elevated, contents fall   Were freestanding walls or fences designed by an architect/engineer to resist lateral forces?
   Is the conveyor control equipment properly anchored?

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Last Updated: 
07/24/2014 - 16:00
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