FEMA E-74 Appendix D. Architectural Components Checklist

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Appendix D. Architectural Components Checklist

Item No./
Subcategory
Example No.Component Name(s)Principal ConcernsCNCNAChecklist Questions
(Yes=Compliance; No or Unknown=Noncompliance; NA=Not Applicable)
6.3.1 Exterior Wall Components

[Exterior falling hazards are a primary concern, especially items situated above 10 feet and items that may fall over exits, walkways, or sidewalks.]
6.3.1.1Adhered VeneerFalling hazard   Is the adhered veneer adequately attached to the structure? [This includes relatively thin sections of tile, masonry, stone, terra cotta, ceramic tile, glass mosaic units, stucco, or similar materials attached to a structural wall or framework by means of an adhesive].
   Based on visual observations and/or tapping, is the veneer free of cracked or loose sections that may fall during an earthquake?
6.3.1.2Anchored VeneerFalling hazard   Is the anchored veneer adequately attached to the structure? [This includes thicker masonry, stone, or stone slab units that are attached to the structure by mechanical anchors].
   Is the masonry or other veneer supported by shelf angles or other elements at each floor?
   Is the masonry or other veneer connected to a structural back-up wall at adequate spacing?
   Has the veneer been adequately maintained? Are the anchors in good condition, free of significant corrosion, and inspected regularly?
6.3.1.3Prefabricated PanelsFalling hazard, damage to panels and connections, broken glass   Were the panels and connections designed by an architect or engineer to accommodate the expected seismic distortion of the surrounding structure?
   Are prefabricated cladding panels detailed to allow relative movement between the panel and the structure?
   Are prefabricated panels supported for vertical loads with at least two connections per panel?
   Are prefabricated panels supported for out-of-plane loads with at least four connections per panel?
   Have the panels been adequately maintained? Are the panel connections in good condition, free of significant corrosion, and inspected regularly?
   Are there adequate separations between panels so they will not come into contact with each other during an earthquake?
6.3.1.4GlazingFalling hazard, broken glass   Is it known that the glazing was designed by an architect or engineer to accommodate the expected seismic distortion of the surrounding structure?
   Do large window panes and storefront windows have safety glass? [All exterior glazing should be laminated, annealed or laminated heat-strengthened safety glass or other glazing system that will remain in the frame when the glass is cracked. This is particularly important for glazing located over 10 feet above an exterior walking surface].
6.3.1.5Glass BlocksFalling hazard, broken glass   Are partial-height glass block walls laterally braced to the structure?
   Is the glass block reinforced with panel anchors and panel reinforcing wire?
6.3.1.6Overhead Glazing or SkylightsFalling hazard, broken glass   Are transoms (glass panes over doors) made of safety glass?
   Are skylights made of safety glass or covered with shatter-resistant film?
   Are large panes made of safety glass or is it known whether the glazing assembly was designed by an architect or engineer to accommodate the expected seismic distortion of the surrounding structure?
6.3.2 Interior Partitions6.3.2.1HeavyFalling hazard; collapse or spalling with debris in exitways; large cracks often mistaken for structural damage   Are block wall partitions reinforced? [This would include concrete masonry unit (CMU), brick, and hollow clay tile partitions. Most brick and hollow clay tile walls in pre-1933 buildings in California are unreinforced; unreinforced masonry partitions may still be found in current construction in other parts of the country.]
   Are unreinforced masonry walls braced at regular intervals? [In zones of low and moderate seismicity, are partitions braced at 10 foot intervals or less? In zones of high seismicity, are partitions braced at 6 foot intervals or less?]
   Are full-height CMU partitions detailed to allow sliding at the top?
6.3.2.2LightCracking of plaster or gypsum board; costly to patch and paint   Are partial-height stud wall partitions braced to the structure above the ceiling line?
   Are full-height stud wall partitions detailed to allow sliding at the top?
   If partitions function as lateral support for tall shelving or other nonstructural components, are these partitions adequately anchored or braced to the structure above the ceiling line?
6.3.2.3GlazedBroken glass   Are interior glazed or glass block partitions laterally braced to the structure?
6.3.3 Interior Veneers6.3.3.1Stone and TileFalling hazard, debris in exitways   Is the adhered veneer adequately attached to the structure?
   Is the anchored veneer adequately attached to the structure?
6.3.4 Ceilings, Soffits6.3.4.1Suspended Acoustic Lay-in Tile CeilingDropped acoustical tiles, perimeter damage, separation of runners and cross runners; falling hazard if grid and lights come down   Does the suspended ceiling have adequate diagonal bracing wires and compression struts to support seismic loads from the ceiling grid plus all lay-in items that do not have independent lateral supports?
   If the ceiling supports lay-in lighting or diffusers, do the lay-in items all have independent vertical supports consisting of wires located at least at two diagonally opposite corners?
   Do lay-in fixtures weighing over 50 pounds additionally have independent lateral bracing wires at all four corners?
   If located in a high seismic zone, is the suspended ceiling supported by a heavy duty ceiling grid with adequate capacity and does the grid include supplemental hanger wires at light fixtures or other mechanical items?
6.3.4.2Directly Applied to StructureFalling hazard   Are decorative ceiling panels and/or latticework securely attached, particularly beneath exterior eves over exits?
   Are decorative finishes and/or latticework on beam soffits or beneath exterior eves securely attached, particularly over exits?
   For plaster ceilings or stucco soffits, is the wire mesh or wood lath securely attached to the structural framing above?
   Is the plaster or stucco in good condition and not deteriorated by water damage or corrosion?
6.3.4.3Suspended Heavy CeilingsFalling hazard   If the suspended gypsum board ceiling extends over more than one level, does the suspended ceiling system have adequate diagonal bracing?
   Is the suspended wire mesh or wood lath securely attached to the structural framing above?
   Is the plaster ceiling in good condition and not deteriorated by water damage?
6.3.4.4Suspended Lath and PlasterFalling hazard, collapse, local spalling   Is the suspended wire mesh or wood lath securely attached to the structural framing above?
   Is the plaster ceiling in good condition and not deteriorated by water damage?
6.3.5 Parapets, Appendages, Roof Tiles6.3.5.1Unreinforced Masonry ParapetsFalling hazard   Are unreinforced masonry parapets adequately braced? [If there is a local parapet ordinance, is it known if the bracing complies with the local ordinance?]
 Parapets, Cornices, AppendagesFalling hazard   Are parapets and cornices reinforced and adequately braced?
   Do other decorative elements and appendages have positive anchorage to the building?
   Are hanging appendages braced or secured with a safety cable?
 Clay Roof TilesFalling hazard   Are clay roof tiles secured to the roof with one nail-and-wire connection per tile?
6.3.6 Canopies, Marquees, and Signs6.3.6.1Canopies, Marquees, and SignsFalling hazard   Are cantilevered elements braced to the structure with steel shapes, not chains, to provide restraint and prevent bouncing?
   Are exterior signs or billboards adequately braced and anchored?
   Are interior signs securely attached with positive connections?
 FlagpolesFalling hazard   Are flagpoles securely attached to the structure?
6.3.7 Chimneys and Stacks6.3.7.1Unreinforced Masonry ChimneyFalling hazard   Is the brick chimney restrained with braces to the roof near the top of the chimney?
   Is the brick chimney anchored near the roof line?
 StacksFalling hazard   Are stacks anchored to the supports or foundation by means of anchor bolts of adequate length and double nuts?
6.3.8 Stairways6.3.8.1Stairways    Do steel stairs in multistory buildings have sliding supports at one end that can accommodate the anticipated interstory displacements?
   Have any unreinforced masonry partitions, piping, or lighting in stairwells been removed, strengthened, encapsulated or braced, especially if the stairway is used as a primary exit route?
6.3.9 Freestanding Walls or Fences6.3.9.1Freestanding Masonry Wall or FenceFalling hazard if over 4' tall   Were freestanding walls or fences designed by an architect/engineer to resist lateral forces?
   Are CMU walls adequately reinforced with vertical bars set in grout-filled cells and horizontal bars embedded in the mortar joints?
   Were CMU walls or fences built with adequate foundations to prevent them from tipping over in an earthquake?

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Last Updated: 
03/21/2013 - 14:14