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February 29, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- As spring arrives in the Lone Star State, recovery from the historic wildfires of late summer 2011 is well under way. There is still work to be done, but the diligent efforts of thousands of survivors and countless other Texans are making a visible difference. Lending a helping hand are the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), partners in the recovery effort along with other federal agencies, local governments and dozens of volunteer organizations across Texas.
February 22, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- As Texans continue to recover from the 2011 wildfires, some may find they have needs that extend beyond the scope of state and federal assistance. That’s when community-based long-term recovery groups can step in, providing the three resources wildfire survivors most often need: money, materials or manpower.
February 21, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas – Local governments and other public entities in 30 Texas counties hit by wildfires from Aug. 30 to Dec. 31, 2011, have 10 days to submit official requests for federal assistance, the Texas Division of Emergency Management and Federal Emergency Management Agency said Tuesday. 
February 14, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas, -- Michael Forstner and James Dixon, two of Texas’ distinguished authorities on the endangered Houston toad, have joined the team of biologists that is helping to ensure the steady pace of Bastrop County’s recovery from the 2011 wildfires by monitoring for the toad, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Texas Division of Emergency Management said Tuesday.
February 10, 2012
Updates
  Favorable weather conditions, especially recent rains and warm nighttime temperatures, have triggered the emergence of the endangered Houston toad in Bastrop County, one of the toad’s few remaining habitats. This is positive indication that toads survived the Labor Day wildfires. Temporary debris piles and hazardous trees being removed from public rights of way and private property in Bastrop County during wildfire recovery, especially brush and vegetative debris, may provide artificial habitat for the toad.
February 9, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- Five months since a Sept. 9 major disaster declaration for the Texas wildfires, assistance to survivors and affected communities has topped $39 million, recovery officials said Thursday. Of the total, more than $13.8 million is in state and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recovery grants for Texans and their families.
February 2, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- Federal disaster aid in the form of Public Assistance reimbursements has been approved for 30 additional Texas counties affected by wildfires in 2011, the Texas Division of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said Thursday. Under the latest amendment to the Sept. 9 major disaster declaration for wildfires that occurred Aug. 30 to Dec. 31, 2011, applicants in 29 counties are eligible to apply for FEMA Public Assistance (PA) grants for measures taken to protect life and property before, during and after the blazes.
February 1, 2012
Disaster Federal Register Notice
January 17, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- More than $1 million in additional disaster assistance is getting to wildfire survivors as a result of a new initiative launched by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in Texas.  Under the initiative, wildfire survivors in 23 Texas counties designated for FEMA Individual Assistance are getting follow-up phone calls from a team of FEMA outreach liaisons. They are helping applicants with the appeal process, explaining letters they may have received from FEMA and assisting applicants with gathering the documentation needed for their claims.
January 12, 2012
News Release
AUSTIN, Texas -- More than 80 percent of wildfires in Texas now strike within two miles of suburban communities. What’s more, the desire to live closer to nature has driven many Texans out of major cities and into areas where neighborhoods meet and mix with undeveloped, natural landscapes. In these areas, called the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI), homes press against and sometimes blend with wild expanses of explosively flammable plants, shrubs and trees.

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